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Intel Haswell E launch rumoured for 2013

Intel Haswell E launch rumoured for 2013

Intel's next E-series enthusiast-grade processor will come from the Haswell range, a source has claimed, with a launch due by the end of the year.

Details have leaked about Intel's planned replacement for the Intel Sandy Bridge E enthusiast-grade processor family, suggesting that Ivy Bridge is being skipped in favour of a jump straight to the next-generation Haswell platform.

Intel's Sandy Bridge E processors, released to the public in November 2011, Intel's Core i7-monikered Sandy Bridge E chips packed Xeon-like hardware into top-end enthusiast-grade packaging. Requiring an entirely new socket type - LGA 2011 - the chips haven't exactly set the retail world alight, but are still a popular choice among gamers looking for top-end performance with no care as to the price-tag.

Since the Sandy Bridge E chips hit the market, however, Ivy Bridge has been released. Offering a process shrink to 22nm and Intel's heavily-hyped tri-gate transistor technology, Ivy Bridge chips easily outperform their last-generation Sandy Bridge equivalents - but there has been no sign of an Ivy Bridge E to replace the Sandy Bridge E family, leaving those who splashed out on an LGA 2011 board with a last-generation processor.

An anonymous source speaking to TweakTown may have an explanation for that: Intel is allegedly planning to skip Ivy Bridge altogether - despite the recent appearance of Ivy Bridge E engineering samples - making its next E-family release a Haswell part.

The next-generation replacement for Ivy Bridge, Haswell is an architectural improvement rather than a process node shift. Packing new features - such as the Haswell New Instructions (HNI), transactional memory technology and a power draw so low as to offer laptops a ten-day 'always-connected' standby lifespan on a single charge. In short: Haswell, if it lives up to Intel's promises, could be a real winner in both the desktop and laptop markets.

According to TweakTown's source, Haswell will form the heart of the next E-series processor range from Intel. With the source pointing to a release by the end of the year, and Haswell expected to be announced - if not made available through retail channels - at Computex in June, the timing certainly adds up: releasing an enthusiast-grade high-performance product based on a last-generation architecture months after the new architecture has been unveiled certainly doesn't seem like a winning sales strategy.

For those who have LGA 2011 motherboards already, however, there comes some bad news: the same unnamed source claims that the new Haswell E chips will require a brand-new chipset dubbed X99, meaning it is unlikely to be compatible with existing X79-based LGA 2011 motherboards.

Intel, naturally, has refused to comment on the source's claims, reiterating only that it does not comment on what it calls 'industry rumour or speculation regarding unannounced products.' The presence of engineering samples, plus rumblings from industry sources of a confirmed 2013 launch for X79-compatible Ivy Bridge E parts, however, mean this particular rumour should be taken with a grain of salt.

20 Comments

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bowman 28th February 2013, 16:27 Quote
'Gamers', heh.. Probably not a lot of gamers buying this.

Benchmark enthusiasts, overclockers, and people with money to burn who boost their ego by posting computer pictures on forums are the target market for these.
Shirty 28th February 2013, 16:29 Quote
So, a large proportion of the readership of this site then? :)
MrGumby 28th February 2013, 16:51 Quote
This puts the cat among the pigeons, for people who went for a i7 3820 and were waiting to see what ivy -e would bring to the table.
Pookie 28th February 2013, 17:13 Quote
High end platforms seem to alway's get a bum deal. Im pretty sure I read (several Years ago) that sandybridge chips would make an appearance on X58. At the time it was just a rumor such as this, but probably affected peoples purchasing decisions. I always assume that one socket will see one generation and consider it a bonus if it doesnt.
[PUNK] crompers 28th February 2013, 17:27 Quote
And professionals of course. Main usage is probably 3d render and bid or photo editting
r3loaded 28th February 2013, 19:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowman
Benchmark enthusiasts, overclockers, and people with money to burn who boost their ego by posting computer pictures on forums are the target market for these.
Actually, don't forget about pros running rendering or other intensive multi-threaded programs who basically need a more consumer-friendly Xeon on a budget. Same holds for the GeForce Titan - it'll be very useful for those who need the Tesla K20 on a budget.
azazel1024 28th February 2013, 19:30 Quote
Depending on what Haswell-E offers for low end, I might consider it at some point. Or Broadwell-E (if such a thing ever exists). I don't strictly NEED it, but if the boards aren't "uber" expensive compared to regular Haswell/Boardwell and the "low end" processors are hexacore at least by that point, it might be worth it for me. I do a fair amount of transcoding, which I don't NEED a faster processor than my 3570, but it wouldn't hurt ot have. I also do a LOT of photoediting...and per op, it wouldn't save me a lot of time, but a lot of stuff I do I regularly see all 4 cores pegged at 95+%.

A savings of 30-40% (for 6 cores + possibly hyperthreading over just 4 cores with no hyperthreading) in time, plus the architectual improvements over Ivy from Haswell and Broadwell (I assume Broadwell will have SOMETHING up its sleeve, even if it isn't much) would be worth while. Photo editing/photography isn't much job, but it is a major, major hobby and cutting 30-40% of time out of the "sitting and waiting for the hour glass to spin" (metaphorically speaking) could easily save me 10-15 minutes in some of my medium sized editing jobs (when sifting/editing dozens to a hundred or two images). On some of my bigger jobs it could easily be 15-20 minutes of savings.

With 3 young kids and the frequency of editing/picture taking, that could be saving me an hour or so a month. Doesn't sound like much...but man, I'd KILL to get an hour of free time back every month.

Anyway, that is more by way of saying if/when I am ready to upgrade my system again, if I can get a $150-200 motherboard and a $350-400 processor that is Hexacore compared to a $120-150 motherboard and $200-250 quad core processor (assuming Haswell and Boardwell continue with quad core being the most you get in the mainline of processors) might be worth it next time around.

Though if the hexa core processors remain $500+, etc...not worth it.
littlepuppi 28th February 2013, 19:58 Quote
Harsh fir those that went for x79 with an eye to ivy... Im not too sure i believe this is whats going to happen though...


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rollo 28th February 2013, 19:58 Quote
Why would intel charge less for a 6 core CPU with AMD a none player in that level of performance.

This is no great shocks in truth as ivy bridge is probably struggling to stay within the thermal envelope already.
bdigital 28th February 2013, 20:11 Quote
Im still considering going x79. Just cant decide whether to do it for my photo editing rig or my gaming one!
littlepuppi 28th February 2013, 20:55 Quote
If this is true could be some bargains coming up for u matey!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
genesisofthesith 28th February 2013, 23:34 Quote
Unless something is off with the engineering samples which would require too much redesign work to get a shipping product out it would make more sense to release Ivy Bridge-E, even if under the radar, to act as a drop-in replacement for those with existing systems.

But longer term, Intel do need to move up their release cadence in regards to the enthusiast platform coming out after the mainstream - perhaps even the high-end getting the new microarchitectures first on the die-shrinks (when the processes are proven) - or drop the enthusiast desktop line and differentiate Xeons further.

If the market for extreme editions is really that great you could release one on the mainstream platform, either by restricting unlocked multipliers as in the past, or by releasing a MCM with two mainstream die.
rollo 28th February 2013, 23:56 Quote
Intel are happy with there server profits I'd imagine to worry about what happens to a small market segment.

The fact we have not seen ivy e by now suggests we won't see it at all.

If AMD were competitive we would of seen a mainstream 6 core CPU by now but the fact is they are not at all competitive and intel does not see the point. When a 3770k is faster than everything adding a 6 core CPU at that price point that's even faster does not make good business sence.

AMDs lack of competitive ability at the high end is starting to hit home on the consumer market for builders. If you want a fast 6 core CPU your paying a premium like it or lump it.

Intel must sell them or they would of reduced the price.

AMD ran a similar thing in the old fx days with overpriced CPUs. Them days intel would always come good, can not say i expect AMD to turn this around.
MrGumby 1st March 2013, 01:17 Quote
I wonder what the yields are for intels dual, quad and above. Would be interesting to see if the high premium for 6 core + was purely because they can or wether poorer yields push the price of many cores up. Id guess it would be a mix of both.
phuzz 1st March 2013, 10:10 Quote
I'm not finding myself being CPU bound with a 3570, but then I rarely had problems with my old C2D right up until a few months ago.
faugusztin 1st March 2013, 10:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGumby
I wonder what the yields are for intels dual, quad and above. Would be interesting to see if the high premium for 6 core + was purely because they can or wether poorer yields push the price of many cores up. Id guess it would be a mix of both.

"High premium" is funny thing to say for Intel CPU pricing, as it was like this for long time. Extreme CPU for $999, second best for $500 (enthusiast), third best for $300 (top mainstream) and from there as it seems fit for current product line.

And $500 isn't a premium price. $3616 per 8-core Xeon with support for 4 socket boards is the premium price :D.
MjFrosty 1st March 2013, 10:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowman
'Gamers', heh.. Probably not a lot of gamers buying this.

Benchmark enthusiasts, overclockers, and people with money to burn who boost their ego by posting computer pictures on forums are the target market for these.

Worst "I have no money" post ever.
Snips 1st March 2013, 12:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MjFrosty
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowman
'Gamers', heh.. Probably not a lot of gamers buying this.

Benchmark enthusiasts, overclockers, and people with money to burn who boost their ego by posting computer pictures on forums are the target market for these.

Worst "I have no money" post ever.

+1 I Lol'd
dyzophoria 3rd March 2013, 16:37 Quote
I have to admit I'm disappointed since the primary reason I bought a asus rampage iv board about a year ago was to hopefully slap in a ivy bridge 2011 counterpart,lol, oh well, til my next upgrade then
Cromulent 22nd March 2013, 17:34 Quote
Shame. I've been waiting to upgrade my i7 3930k for awhile now. If I have to buy a new motherboard I'll be annoyed.
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