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Intel pledges 8th Gen Coffee Lake launch by year's end

Intel pledges 8th Gen Coffee Lake launch by year's end

Intel has pledged to launch Coffee Lake, its eighth-generation Core design and likely final mainstream 14nm part, before the year is out with a 15 percent performance uplift.

Intel has pledged to launch its eighth-generation Core processors, known under the codename Coffee Lake, in the second half of the year with a 15 percent performance boost over equivalent seventh-generation Kaby Lake parts.

Following the abandonment of its tick-tock development cycle, which had previously seen the company alternate between transitioning to a smaller process node and developing a new microarchitecture each year, Intel has been pushing incremental architectural improvements on its existing 14nm node. With its 10nm problems now reportedly resolved, the time is coming for the company to move off 14nm and launch its promised Cannon Lake parts - but first it's giving 14nm one last hurrah with a tweaked microarchitecture it calls Coffee Lake.

Full details about Coffee Lake are not yet available, but in a teaser posted to the company's official Twitter account Intel pledged a greater-than-15 percent performance boost in the SysMark benchmark - equal to or greater than the boost from the sixth Core generation to the seventh. The launch of eighth-generation Coffee Lake parts is also promised for the second half of this year, earlier than a previously rumoured H1 2018 release - potentially as the result of increased pressure as rival AMD gears up to release its latest Ryzen processor family.

At the same time, Intel has announced a new top-end Xeon processor featuring 24 physical cores and Hyper-Threading support for 48 threads. Running at 2.4GHz and boosting to 3.4GHz under selected workloads and with 60MB of cache, the Broadwell-based Xeon E7-8894 v4 has a 165W thermal design profile (TDP) and will go toe-to-toe with AMD's server-centric 32-core 64-thread Ryzen parts. Pricing has been set at $8,898 (around £7,118 excluding taxes) in single units.

Intel has not yet offered a firm launch date or pricing for the Coffee Lake family of chips, which is expected to include variants for laptops, desktops, enthusiast desktops, and embedded low-power systems.

27 Comments

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Maki role 10th February 2017, 10:50 Quote
I'm hoping for performance that's a latte higher than previous generation changes, recently the jump between generations has been all but flat white. I wonder if upcoming AMD competition is encouraging them to be more espresso with their launches?
Gareth Halfacree 10th February 2017, 10:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maki role
I'm hoping for performance that's a latte higher than previous generation changes, recently the jump between generations has been all but flat white. I wonder if upcoming AMD competition is encouraging them to be more espresso with their launches?
I applaud your commitment to the bit!
bawjaws 10th February 2017, 10:52 Quote
You've really ground out those puns there. You should be shot for those (after you've been tried for crimes against puns, so you'd better hope you have a good barista).
Anfield 10th February 2017, 10:59 Quote
Look at the picture on the intel tweet linked in the article, they claim 7th gen (Kabylake) is 15% faster than 6th Gen and 8th Gen will be 15% faster than 7th Gen.
But we all know the claim in regards to Kabylake vs Skylake does not apply to desktop cpus...
DbD 10th February 2017, 11:02 Quote
More importantly Coffee Lake is meant to bring 6 core mainstream processors. Combine that with a decent performance boost and they will sell bucket loads of them.
Corky42 10th February 2017, 11:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anfield
Look at the picture on the intel tweet linked in the article, they claim 7th gen (Kabylake) is 15% faster than 6th Gen and 8th Gen will be 15% faster than 7th Gen.
But we all know the claim in regards to Kabylake vs Skylake does not apply to desktop cpus...

They must have missed off the ' . ' ;)
Harlequin 10th February 2017, 11:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
More importantly Coffee Lake is meant to bring 6 core mainstream processors. Combine that with a decent performance boost and they will sell bucket loads of them.

AMD have had 6 core `mainstream` since phenom x6
tristanperry 10th February 2017, 11:22 Quote
I definitely believe Intel's 15% performance boost claim.

</Sarcasm>
runadumb 10th February 2017, 11:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlequin
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
More importantly Coffee Lake is meant to bring 6 core mainstream processors. Combine that with a decent performance boost and they will sell bucket loads of them.

AMD have had 6 core `mainstream` since phenom x6

But their IPC sucked compared to Intel so outside of specialisted work sets they were a bad choice for most people.

Now AMD and Intel are rumoured to be in parity things will finally get interesting again. I am considering 6 core this time, so long as it makes sense
Vault-Tec 10th February 2017, 11:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by tristanperry
I definitely believe Intel's 15% performance boost claim.

</Sarcasm>

But it is 15% faster. 1 2

http://i.imgur.com/x4M129Y.jpg

1 2 In one benchmark.


</Sarcasm>
Vault-Tec 10th February 2017, 12:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maki role
I'm hoping for performance that's a latte higher than previous generation changes, recently the jump between generations has been all but flat white. I wonder if upcoming AMD competition is encouraging them to be more espresso with their launches?

You're 'avin a lava.
cdb 10th February 2017, 14:17 Quote
I thought Cannonlake was the Kabylake successor? Where did Coffeelake suddenly appear from? It never came up in my Google Kabylake successor searches.
Gareth Halfacree 10th February 2017, 14:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdb
I thought Cannonlake was the Kabylake successor? Where did Coffeelake suddenly appear from? It never came up in my Google Kabylake successor searches.
Cannon Lake (or Cannonlake, depending on your preferred spelling) is Intel's upcoming 10nm part; this announcement is about Coffee Lake, which is 14nm - hence the slide being titled "advancing Moore's Law on 14nm," rather than "look what happens when our 10nm node finally launches!"

There's marginally more on Wikipedia, if you're curious.
Anfield 10th February 2017, 15:39 Quote
Currently for sale:
Ivy Bridge (a couple of the low TDP T editions are still not end of life)
Haswell
Devil's Canyon
Haswell-E
Broadwell-E
Skylake
Kabylake

Coming this year:
Skylake-X
Kabylake-X
Cannon Lake
Coffee Lake

And thats without even counting the 5 billion mobile and Xeon variants...

Maybe they'll start bundling their cpus with a guide to understanding their product lineup in the near future:D
N17 dizzi 10th February 2017, 15:43 Quote
This is making a mocha of the processor industry.
raxonb 10th February 2017, 17:34 Quote
Will the non-overclockable chips be known as the decaff version?
cdb 10th February 2017, 17:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Cannon Lake (or Cannonlake, depending on your preferred spelling) is Intel's upcoming 10nm part; this announcement is about Coffee Lake, which is 14nm - hence the slide being titled "advancing Moore's Law on 14nm," rather than "look what happens when our 10nm node finally launches!"

There's marginally more on Wikipedia, if you're curious.

I know that I read it.

My point was - everytime I googled "Kabylake successor" it only ever mentioned Cannonlake, so was Coffeelake always scheduled or is Google (or my use of it) just crap?

PS what slide? the article is called "Intel pledges 8th Gen Coffee Lake launch by year's end"
Yadda 10th February 2017, 17:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by raxonb
Will the non-overclockable chips be known as the decaff version?

I believe there will be three variants of the "performance locked" chips: Tassimo, Nespresso and Dolce Gusto.
Gareth Halfacree 10th February 2017, 17:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdb

PS what slide? the article is called "Intel pledges 8th Gen Coffee Lake launch by year's end"

The slide discussed in the article? The one on Intel's Twitter feed? Which is linked to? In the article? That one?

As for your skills in operating Google, I don't know what to tell you: Coffee Lake's been on the cards since mid-2016 as a stopgap until Intel could get 10nm working and launch Cannon Lake.
cdb 11th February 2017, 10:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
The slide discussed in the article? The one on Intel's Twitter feed? Which is linked to? In the article? That one?

As for your skills in operating Google, I don't know what to tell you: Coffee Lake's been on the cards since mid-2016 as a stopgap until Intel could get 10nm working and launch Cannon Lake.

Fair enough, for some reason that Link didn't stand out yesterday.

"mid-2016 as a stopgap" probably explains it. I haven't looked a great deal recently, but it wasn't there when I did look and since then I've searched cannonlake for updates, not expecting them to sneak something else in in the mean time.
Harlequin 11th February 2017, 10:44 Quote
http://wccftech.com/intel-14nm-coffee-lake-10nm-cannonlake-2018/

intel have had issues (and some say still do) with 10nm , so coffee lake is another respin of skylake
raxonb 11th February 2017, 12:50 Quote
I'll have an 8700K with cream and two sugars please
Vault-Tec 11th February 2017, 13:20 Quote
I think we should filter some of the posts here.
Anfield 11th February 2017, 18:06 Quote
Quote:
Despite this, if you were to believe supposed ‘leaked’ roadmaps (which we haven’t confirmed from a second source as of yet), the 8th Generation product ‘Cannon Lake’ is more geared towards the Y and U part of Intel’s roadmap. This would ring true with a mobile first strategy that Intel has mirrored with recent generations such that the smaller, low power chips are off the production line for a new product first, however we'd also expect 10nm to also be in the smaller chips first too (as demonstrated at CES). Where Cannon Lake will end up in the desktop or enterprise segment however remains to be seen. To put something a bit more solid into this, Ashraf also mentioned words from Dr. Venkata ‘Murthy’ Renduchintala, VP and GM of Client and IoT:

‘Murthy referred to it at the event, process tech use will be ‘fluid’ based on segment’.

If one read too much into this, we may start seeing a blend of process nodes for different segments at the same time for different areas of the market. We already do have that to some extent with the mainstream CPUs and the HEDT/Xeon families, but this phrasing seems that we might get another split between consumer products or consumer and enterprise. We may get to a point where Intel's 'Gen' naming scheme for its CPUs covers two or more process node variants.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/11115/intel-confirms-8th-gen-core-on-14nm-data-center-first-to-new-nodes

Mobile and Servers first, f*** the Desktop?
TheMadDutchDude 11th February 2017, 19:24 Quote
Intel has closer to 30% on each generation if you use THEIR own XTU software, so they might be on to something with their 15% increase.

...

/troll mode.
ModSquid 16th February 2017, 16:46 Quote
CPU market has bean cold and stale for too long.
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