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Intel fixes 10nm process, promises Cannon Lake this year

Intel fixes 10nm process, promises Cannon Lake this year

Intel's Brian Krzanich has promised that Cannon Lake, the company's first processor based on a 10nm manufacturing node, will launch before the year is out - two years after its original launch window.

Intel has seemingly resolved its ongoing problems transitioning to a 10nm semiconductor manufacturing, promising to launch its eighth-generation Cannon Lake Core chips before the end of the year.

The move from 14nm to 10nm manufacturing nodes has not been smooth for Intel. The company's original roadmap called for the first 10nm chips to launch in 2015, but despite considerable investment the transition did not go well. By June 2015, rumours were spreading that Intel was going to miss the launch, while in July Intel's Brian Krzanich confirmed that the launch of the 10nm 'Cannon Lake' processors would have to be pushed back to some time in the second half of 2017.

The issues surrounding the 10nm transition - which were also felt during the development of the 14nm Broadwell parts, delayed to 2014 thanks to the increasingly complex physics surrounding ever-smaller components - have had a serious effect on Intel's development process. In March last year, Intel announced it was killing off the tick-tock development cycle it had rigorously adhered to earlier in the Moore's Law difficulty curve: Instead of releasing a revised architecture one year followed by the same architecture on a smaller process node the year after, Intel's new approach extends the life of each node by concentrating more on architectural improvements.

Now, though, Intel is confident that it has the 10nm issues resolved - so confident, in fact, that Intel's Brian Krzanich took to the stage at the Consumer Electronics show to promise that the first Cannon Lake parts would appear before the end of this year - despite having only just brought the 14nm Kaby Lake architecturally enhanced processor family to the open market.

The announcement brings Intel's semiconductor manufacturing technology back on a level playing field with the like of TSMC, but former AMD manufacturing arm GlobalFoundries is claiming to be skipping 10nm in favour of jumping to 7nm with the first chips due to enter production in 2018.

16 Comments

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greigaitken 10th January 2017, 11:27 Quote
it's ok, it doesn't matter that much

10 years ago, my pc was q6600 with whatever the 2nd best nvidia card was......

10 years before that i had pentium 166 mmx!

back then everybody needed more cpu throughput cause everything was slow.

now, even the average joe won't notice if you doubled throughput overnight, cause that 10yrs old cpu will let you facebook etc....
greigaitken 10th January 2017, 11:39 Quote
typo - sorry
"promise that the fist Cannon Lake parts"
Gareth Halfacree 10th January 2017, 11:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
typo - sorry
"promise that the fist Cannon Lake parts"
Whoopsie - I'll go fix that, ta!
dstarr3 10th January 2017, 16:55 Quote
"AMD manufacturing arm GlobalFoundries is claiming to be skipping 10nm in favour of jumping to 7nm with the first chips due to enter production in 2018." Considering Intel struggled so much with 10nm, good luck with that, AMD.
Gareth Halfacree 10th January 2017, 17:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstarr3
"AMD manufacturing arm GlobalFoundries is claiming to be skipping 10nm in favour of jumping to 7nm with the first chips due to enter production in 2018." Considering Intel struggled so much with 10nm, good luck with that, AMD.

S'nowt to do with AMD, that: they don't own GlobalFoundries anymore. You missed the rather important word "former" from the start of your extract!
Paradigm Shifter 10th January 2017, 21:28 Quote
Perhaps it's the cynic in me, but I can't help but wonder if Intel suddenly 'solving' issues with 10nm is because Zen (or "Ryzen") is sufficiently good to actually make Intel worried. It would be great to see some competition again in the CPU space.

Although, to be fair, I'm running five AMD rigs at the minute (an APU system as a proxy and four quad-socket machines - they do use older gen 6100 series Opterons, however...) but I'm also responsible for the same number of Intel systems, so...
mypickaxe 10th January 2017, 23:11 Quote
Intel brought the Kaby Lake family to market in Q3 2016. It isn't "new" to the market, the only thing "new" is the desktop line. So, considering this as fact, bringing Cannon Lake by the end of the year isn't all that surprising.
fingerbob69 11th January 2017, 09:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
it's ok, it doesn't matter that much

10 years ago, my pc was q6600 with whatever the 2nd best nvidia card was......

10 years before that i had pentium 166 mmx!

back then everybody needed more cpu throughput cause everything was slow.

now, even the average joe won't notice if you doubled throughput overnight, cause that 10yrs old cpu will let you facebook etc....

We entered the era of 'Good Enough' at least four years ago. I'd like to upgrade my system this year. Weather it's Ryzen or i7 ...it will be good enough for +6 years to come.
chrisb2e9 11th January 2017, 20:51 Quote
Yeah, my computer is still good enough with parts from 2011. Only thing I have upgraded is my SDD and my GPU.
Any new CPU that comes out, needs to be a lot better to get me to spend the money.
AiA 12th January 2017, 00:28 Quote
Only reason I have to upgrade would be for Battlefield 1, still using a QX9650
but all the other games I'm still good.

I think we are 2 years behind because AMD was not a threat to Intel.
I think 5Ghz was meant to be achieved many years ago as standard to. Remember reading something about that 10+ years ago in Custom PC

It will be interesting to see what happens if AMD can produce the goods.
damien c 12th January 2017, 08:04 Quote
Yay so another Intel CPU that will not be worth upgrading to if you have anything from a 4770K and above.

I really hope Ryzen, is as good as AMD say it is because Intel need a good kick to actually start offering performance improvements, and lowering prices.
rollo 12th January 2017, 08:08 Quote
AMD becoming competitive will only force Intels hand if it's dirt cheap. Look at gpus the 470 and 480 have done little to nothing to Nvidias market share. And they are pretty price competitive.
jrs77 12th January 2017, 20:09 Quote
I would rather see intel bringing back IrisPro to the desktop and improve upon that than more raw CPU-power which isn't really needed at this point.
It makes absolutely no sense, that IrisPro is only available for mobile parts, when this is an ideal solution for workstations that need some GPU-performance in the regions of the entry-level cards.

Yes, Broadwell wasn't that much of a success, but that was only due to very poor advertisement. This chip should've been heavily advertised to professionals, as it has alot of raw CPU-power and a very decent iGPU capable of boosting graphics and video-software without a dedicated GPU. And all that in a 65W TDP chip that is easy to cool in a very small case and to be powered by a picoPSU, etc...

Seriously.
bawjaws 12th January 2017, 20:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollo
AMD becoming competitive will only force Intels hand if it's dirt cheap. Look at gpus the 470 and 480 have done little to nothing to Nvidias market share. And they are pretty price competitive.

It's just not in AMD's interests to sell Ryzen "dirt cheap" - sure, if they can offer similar performance to Intel then they can differentiate on price to a certain extent, but they can't afford to a) cut their own throats and sell Ryzen so cheap that they don't make enough money to keep afloat or b) sell at such a low price that they destroy the perception of being true rival products to Intel.

That second point is fundamental, imo - sure, informed buyers may realise that Intel and AMD offer similar products but AMD deliver far better value, but less informed buyers will look at the price differential and assume that AMD's offering can't possibly be equivalent to Intel's - the old adage about getting what you pay for will come to mind (even if it's not appropriate). Let's be honest, informed enthusiast buyers make up a tiny proportion of the market.

That said, I hope that AMD can undercut Intel to some extent, and that this will mean better value for money for us (regardless of whether Intel choose to enter a price war). Of course, this is all subject to the standard Ryzen caveats - we need to see what the product range is actually like, the performance, price and availability (plus the total platform cost).
Corky42 13th January 2017, 09:30 Quote
Speaking of Ryzen and not wanting to go too much OT but do we know what IGP it's going to be using?
rollo 13th January 2017, 11:07 Quote
None has been mentioned in any talk I have saw about it. I would assume it's a pure cpu without igpu. AMD talked about making apu chips but they have not been listed alongside the main chips
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