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Intel announces Braswell, Cherry Trail

Intel announces Braswell, Cherry Trail

Intel's Bay Trail architecture is to be succeeded by a low-cost system-on-chip design dubbed Braswell and a higher-priced family known as Cherry Trail.

Intel has announced its planned successors for the Bay Trail architecture, 14nm designs dubbed Braswell and Cherry Trail and aimed at low-cost portables.

Unveiled at the company's Intel Developer Forum China last night, little is known about the new designs beyond their overall aims and the company's use of a 14nm process node - and, Kirk Skaugen told attendees, Intel's hopes to use the chips to help Google grow its Chromebook and Chromebox businesses.

Braswell will focus on ultra-low cost devices, Intel claimed, and use a system-on-chip (SoC) design to reduce the size of the final product as well as the number of supporting chips required. The result, it is claimed, will be entry-level smartphones and tablets boasting a full 64-bit x86 implementation and with excellent power draw.

Braswell is to be joined by Cherry Trail, a more powerful design still based on a 14nm process. Unlike the smartphone-oriented Braswell, Cherry Trail will be aimed at tablets and will offer higher performance at the cost of size and power draw. No performance figures were provided for either design, however.

Intel also told attendees of changes it plans to make to its Bay Trail design, promising new models which will reduce the cost of the processors and their supporting components still further. The aim, it is claimed, is for the company's customers to be able to launch tablets based on Bay Trail designs for under $100 (around £60 excluding taxes) - a price point currently the exclusive preserve of ARM-based systems from semiconductor companies like AllWinner.

The announcement of the new designs comes as Intel looks to partner with software companies to develop packages exclusive to Intel's own chips, something its rival AMD has previously investigated with projects like the AMD AppZone.

Release dates and pricing for Braswell and Cherry Trail parts were, naturally, not part of Intel's presentation.

2 Comments

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jrs77 3rd April 2014, 16:24 Quote
Allthough I very much like low-power designs, it's cruicial that these chips don't run on a snails pace. Especially smartphones and tablets need to be as responsive as possible, aka lightning fast. Tipping on the screen should result in instant action and not a "wait-for-process-symbol".
bawjaws 3rd April 2014, 16:30 Quote
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