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Microsoft Surface 2 with LTE nearing launch

Microsoft Surface 2 with LTE nearing launch

Microsoft's Surface 2 tablet is to get an LTE-equipped model in the very near future - at least, if you're buying one in the US.

Microsoft's promised Surface 2 with integrated Long Term Evolution (LTE) mobile broadband looks to be just around the corner, with leaks pointing to an impending launch - in the US, at least.

Microsoft's original entries into the tablet market, the Surface RT and Surface Pro, didn't prove to be great successes. Beset by hardware and software flaws and a price that put them up against the very best the competition had to offer, the tablets were a major loss-maker for the company. That didn't stop the launch of second-generation models which proved significantly more popular, while still leaving the company and its operating systems with a tiny share of the overall tablet market.

In September last year, Microsoft's Panos Panay suggested in a Reddit thread that the company was planning to close the feature gap between the Surface family and the competition with the launch of a model featuring in-built high-speed mobile broadband in early 2014. With 'early 2014' rapidly passing, there has been no official announcement of such a beast - but leaked images supplied to WP Central suggest that the launch is just around the corner.

According to the site's unnamed source, Microsoft Stores in the US have begun receiving stock of the LTE-enabled Surface 2, based on the company's ARM-compatible Windows RT operating system. These devices are designed for use on the AT&T mobile network, although it's not yet clear whether they will be unlocked and compatible with rival providers. With no official word from Microsoft, it's also not clear how long it will take for the device to make its way to the UK; the Surface Pro, for comparison, took a laggardly seven months to make the same trip.

While Microsoft isn't willing to talk about the Surface 2 Pro with LTE just yet, it has finally announced the release of the Surface Power Cover. A keyboard add-on with built-in battery, and designed to give the Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2 or Surface 2 a 70 per cent boost in run time per charge, the accessory is due to ship on the 19th of March in the US at $199.99. Again, however, no UK pricing or availability information has been provided.

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SlowMotionSuicide 11th March 2014, 11:00 Quote
Aah yes, the second edition to the tablet practically no one gave a flying **** about.
Corky42 11th March 2014, 11:12 Quote
Is it just me that thinks Microsoft is showing up to the party late these days, sure they are giving consumers what they want, it just seems to be ages after the product hits the market.
Nexxo 11th March 2014, 11:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowMotionSuicide
Aah yes, the second edition to the tablet practically no one gave a flying **** about.

Yup, nobody gives a ****.

Moreover:
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyote
What's starting to really annoy me now is everyone and I mean everyone I know has dumped their PCs for tablets. Most of these are i pads now I'm getting a constant stream of people asking to use my desktop PC as the i pad won't do what they want. The last one was a cousin of my neighbour. He needed to download an application to join the Met police. Of course, his i pad wouldn't display them as the forms were in Microsoft word format. Then it's "can I use your printer?" I going to start charging for this service.
I think after a while they will be buying new desktop PCs as they realise I'm getting fed up with it and I'm not always in.

With a Surface you don't have that problem. OS supports .zip; Office is on board and you can USB, Bluetooth or WiFi interface with any peripheral going. Download anything, print anywhere. Business types with iPads are starting to find that out too. Microsoft should be advertising that angle much stronger, but as usual Penn is too busy with his hate campaign against Google Chromebook. That man really needs to be dragged into the garden and shot through the head (metaphorically speaking, NSA!).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Is it just me that thinks Microsoft is showing up to the party late these days, sure they are giving consumers what they want, it just seems to be ages after the product hits the market.

Better late than never? In any case even Thurrot is starting to see the point of Windows RT. I still wish they'd unlock the desktop though... my next device may be a Surface Pro 3.
Corky42 11th March 2014, 11:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Yup, nobody gives a ****.

All that link says is that the Surface revenue reached $893 million, up from $400 million during fiscal first quarter. It doesn't say how many they sold, unlike when they tell us how many Xbox One's they sold.
In fact according to Gartner the Surface only accounts for 2.1% of the market, with only 4,031,802 tablets sold during 2013.
Nexxo 11th March 2014, 11:56 Quote
Considering the early reputation it established by its dismal start, characterised by poor rollout and the worst marketing campaign ever, coupled with crazy hostility by Apple-loving tech reviewers, and competing with the well-established JesusPad and dirt-cheap but surprisingly good Android tablets, that is not a bad performance.
Corky42 11th March 2014, 12:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Considering the early reputation it established by its dismal start, characterised by poor rollout and the worst marketing campaign ever, coupled with crazy hostility by Apple-loving tech reviewers, and competing with the well-established JesusPad and dirt-cheap but surprisingly good Android tablets, that is not a bad performance.
IMO its awful, it could be argued that the Xbox One had the same "dismal start, characterised by poor rollout and the worst marketing campaign ever" and it's having to compete with the (arguably) better and cheaper PS4. Yet that managed to sell 3.9 million in just five weeks, almost as many Surface's sold in the entire year.
Nexxo 11th March 2014, 12:12 Quote
The Xbox One already has an existing customer base, who are bound to upgrade from their 360's and XBox originals. But remember how the original started out?

The Surface doesn't have an existing customer base. In that market the iPad and Android Nexus have one already; the Surface has to win one.
Gareth Halfacree 11th March 2014, 12:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
IMO its awful, it could be argued that the Xbox One had the same "dismal start, characterised by poor rollout and the worst marketing campaign ever" and it's having to compete with the (arguably) better and cheaper PS4. Yet that managed to sell 3.9 million in just five weeks, almost as many Surface's sold in the entire year.
Apples to oranges there, chap. You're comparing two very different products in two very different markets. To break it down into the three main reasons why that argument fails:

Established Brand
The Xbox brand is, I'm sure you'll agree, well-established. Like the PlayStation brand, it has a loyal following of fanboys who would pick up an Xbox-branded turd if one were available. Many of these fanboys pre-ordered an Xbox One. Matter of fact, I remember writing about several retailers saying that pre-order volumes of both the Xbox One and PS4 were vastly higher than their predecessors. Still others will have bought an Xbox One 'cos they've got an Xbox 360 and wanted to upgrade. Yet more will have bought them as extravagant presents for their kids, 'cos they recognise the brand.
Surface, by contrast, is not a recognised brand. As Nexxo points out, those that have heard of it will likely have done so in a negative light thanks to well-publicised stock issues, hardware flaws, software defects and the like. Even though these are largely resolved with the new generation, the stench remains. Finally, you've got the issue of advertising: Microsoft shares its advertising efforts with publishers, who heavily advertise their own games while mentioning that they're available on the Xbox One. The Surface, by contrast, is advertised by Microsoft and by Microsoft alone - meaning it reaches fewer eyeballs.

Competition
You quite rightly say that the Xbox One faces stiff competition from the PS4. That's not exactly what we're seeing in the tablet market, though. Here, Microsoft - a newcomer, not a third-generation entry into a market in which Microsoft has shown dominance before - is competing directly with Apple, Samsung, Sony, Asus and Google at the high end, and faces still more competition from significantly cheaper competition that can offer a big chunk of what the Surface has for a fraction of the price. Kinda like the Nintendo Wii U compared to the Xbox One, if the Wii U was made by a thousand different manufacturers who combined to account for a very large percentage of the overall market.

Target Market
This applies more to the Surface Pro range than the Surface RT, but can be argued for the latter. The Xbox brand targets affluent gamers who aren't averse to spending a buck or two on the next big thing, and relies on selling one device each to a few million people coupled with the lovely recurring revenue stream of games and subscription sales. The Surface Pro, on the other hand, targets business users - and the majority of said business users are relying on their companies to buy them the devices they use. Just as everyone ended up with BlackBerries 'cos it was what the top brass use, everyone's ending up with iPads. It takes a lot more than a year for a business to see a new product, evaluate it and come to the decision to order a thousand or so - especially when it's not compatible with any of the devices they've already bought. Give it time, and the allure of Office compatibility coupled with legacy compatibility for the Pro, and I'd expect that to shift.

Why yes, I am procrastinating. Why do you ask?
Corky42 11th March 2014, 12:32 Quote
And that is the point, both had similarly badly handled launches but people wanted the Xbox One because they had used previous generations. Not many people want the Surface, will people want a Surface 13 years from now ? only time will tell.

EDIT: FYI, I'm not saying no one will ever want a Surface, it's just not many people want them at the moment, like i said only time will tell if that changes.
Gareth Halfacree 11th March 2014, 12:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
And that is the point, both had similarly badly handled launches but people wanted the Xbox One because they had used previous generations. Not many people want the Surface, will people want a Surface 13 years from now ? only time will tell.
Eh? In the five years before it was discontinued, the original Xbox sold just over 24 million units. That's just shy of five million a year, which shows that Gartner's estimate of four million Surface sales in a year is actually pretty good going considering the negative press at launch.
Corky42 11th March 2014, 12:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Eh? In the five years before it was discontinued, the original Xbox sold just over 24 million units. That's just shy of five million a year, which shows that Gartner's estimate of four million Surface sales in a year is actually pretty good going considering the negative press at launch.
And its competitor the PS2 sold 153 Million, I'm not trying to directly compare the Surface with the Xbox, merely pointing out that at this moment in history, what SlowMotionSuicide said about the Surface 2 "the second edition to the tablet practically no one gave a flying **** about." is IMHO correct, like i said only time will tell if that changes.
Nexxo 11th March 2014, 12:51 Quote
Not many people seemed to want the XBox when it came out in 2001. Sony was already on the second gen of the PlayStation by then, having established a firm user base. But in the end the Xbox series did alright, no?

The Surface has to find its own niche to compete in the tablet market. It has tried to position itself as a tablet that can do productivity, but unfortunately as Gareth points out, in business the purchasing decisions are made mainly by the company, not the user. There is also the independent professional and the student, but marketing has failed to focus on them. Instead Microsoft has tried to market the Surface to the iPad crowd: this is a hip, fun product (but we won't show you how it positively differentiates itself from the iPad).

The whole click-that-touchcover advert illustrates the ****-up-ness of the adverts: aimed at the consumer, it emphasises its main productivity feature. The dancing office advert is aimed at the productivity crowd, but tries to convey how hip and fun a product it is. And the students? They all relate to dancing school girls, of course.

The Surface will eventually find its niche as the magic of tablets wears off and people actually want them to do useful stuff, and as technology progresses to deliver a Surface Pro (3 or 4) at Surface RT lightness, battery life and price. But Microsoft's marketing is a hindrance rather than a help.

tl;dr: it's too early to tell. At least it's doing better than the Chromobook, eh?
Corky42 11th March 2014, 13:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Not many people seemed to want the XBox when it came out in 2001. Sony was already on the second gen of the PlayStation by then, having established a firm user base. But in the end the Xbox series did alright, no?
I think the series as a whole has done alright, i seem to have the idea in my head that Microsoft has made more money from the Xbox brand than Sony has from the Playstation brand, although i could have that wrong so forgive me if i have. From a company/share holder point of view profit trumps units sold IMHO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
tl;dr: it's too early to tell. At least it's doing better than the Chromobook, eh?
Sure is, i think the Chromebook is bunched into the other category when it come to tablet sales. :)
SlowMotionSuicide 11th March 2014, 13:11 Quote
Quote:
That image is over a year old. Not giving MS much of a chance really is it?

Goddamn speedgoogling. I just went through the title. The damn thing's so niche nobody even bothers to include it in their market share graphs. Here's more up to date numbers.

Windows RT had a market share of 2.1% in 2013
Shirty 11th March 2014, 13:13 Quote
That image is over a year old. Not giving MS much of a chance really is it?

I found these projections more telling:

OS market share in tablet unit sales
2012 (actual): Apple 58%, Android 40%, Microsoft 2%
2013 (estimate): Android 58%, Apple 38%, Microsoft 4%
2014 (forecast): Android 65%, Apple 30%, Microsoft 5%
2015 (forecast): Android 64%, Apple 29%, Microsoft 6%
2016 (forecast): Android 63%, Apple 28%, Microsoft 8%
2017 (forecast): Android 63%, Apple 27%, Microsoft 10%
(source: Canalys, November 2013)

OS market share in tablet unit sales
2012 (actual): Android 52%, iOS 45.6%, Microsoft 0.9%; Other: 1.4%
2013 (forecast): Android 60.8%, iOS 35%, Microsoft 3.4%; Other: 0.8%
2017 (forecast): Android 58.8%, iOS 30.6%, Microsoft 10.2%; Other: 0.4%
(source: IDC, December 2013)
rollo 11th March 2014, 13:16 Quote
Well I own a surface pro 2 and even ill say its not a huge seller as nexxo would like to think. 1-2mil sold at last check is hardly ground breaking stuff. ( Apple and Samsung and Sony all sold more high end laptops than Microsoft sold Surface pro 2s in the same quater )

Its a nice piece of kit has it really done much for my day to day not really. Its battery life is still not really there as far as im concerned. It can have whatever features it wants like this LTE thing fact is that will just suck the battery life harder.

My phone does for mobile internet it can work as a hotpoint and does 4g why would I pay MS another £100 for something useless that drains more of my battery hmm.

Chromebook has outsold the Surface in all its various forms last I checked.
Xbox has cost Microsoft aprox 4bil to do, They have made aprox 1bil on top of that.
Sony Playstation has cost more and earned more.

Look at ps4 vs xbox one now both launched together, The general feeling is the xbox is getting smashed in sales 2-1 sales lead is the rumours about. With MS even having to deny a sale of sorts.
Nexxo 11th March 2014, 13:34 Quote
The Surface Pro 2 is the same class of product as a MacBook Pro, but again without the established customer base and reputation. Expensive, for enthusiasts only.

Chromebook outsold the Surface? I'll have that link shown to me, sir. :)
impar 11th March 2014, 13:56 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Chromebook outsold the Surface? I'll have that link shown to me, sir.
Quote:
Corky42 11th March 2014, 14:02 Quote
That's only for the US market, any global figures ?
Nexxo 11th March 2014, 14:08 Quote
Oh yeah, that NPD report that stated "chromebooks account for 21% of all laptop sales". Which sounds a lot until you look at the absolute figures:
Quote:
Together, devices running Google's Chromebook and Android platforms accounted for 1.76 million units moving through the channel.

That is Chromebook and Android taken together; judging by the graph Chromebooks alone account for about 923000 units. During the same quarter about 1.3 million Surfaces were sold.
Corky42 11th March 2014, 15:17 Quote
Just to update Gareth's original article, it seems WP Central has an update on prices, with some shots of the stock.
Quote:
The 64 GB version of the LTE based Surface 2 will have an in-store price of $679. Compared to $549 for the 64 GB non-LTE Surface 2, consumers are looking at $130 price hike for having permanent internet connectivity. We do not yet know if AT&T will be offering any tie ins or contract deals to lower that amount, though it’s certainly feasible if you toss in a 2-year contract.
impar 11th March 2014, 21:03 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
That's only for the US market, any global figures ?
Thats the one that made the rounds some time ago (expression is this, right?). It scared Microsoft even more.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Oh yeah, that NPD report that stated "chromebooks account for 21% of all laptop sales".
Yep.
Nexxo 11th March 2014, 22:04 Quote
The significance of that 21% figure is much disputed. But Microsoft's anti-Chromebook commercials are IMO an epically moronic move. Microsoft should be working on rebuilding the damaged reputation of their competing product, the Surface, rather than trying to tarnish that of the Chromebook. All it does is raise awareness in the public's mind of the Chromebook and that it is obviously a competitor worthy of Microsoft's concern.

This is Mark Penn again, of course. The man is toxic waste. I wish he was just fired.
ArcAngeL 11th March 2014, 23:49 Quote
If they were able, they should of given the surface pro away to every tech net subscriber, when it was still in action.

The best way to introduce a new product is through, giving a hands on experience, surface has been a late adoption, mostly due to the OS and business environment.

What is annoying is there is cheap bay trail chips out there, that would offer an affordable option to businesses that need legacy PC apps.

Where they really need to strike a blow is in the education sector. And personally they should be creating a product and environment purely for that. A lot of the sales of tablets are pushed by school laptop/tablet programs. For every school they sell their solution to, they sell a minimum of 200-500 units.

Branding, and engaging the user with the product is the key to the success of the brand.

Microsoft did this once before with windows, and almost bankrupt apple.
Nexxo 12th March 2014, 00:01 Quote
When Panos, the lead of the Surface development team was asked why the Surface RT did not include a stylus (such an obvious unique selling point!), he stated that it simply had not occurred to them. This is for a productivity tablet that would be aimed at students taking notes in class. With OneNote, the best note taking application ever.

It shows how Microsoft thinks. Technically the Surface is a beautiful feat of engineering. In terms of user experience: who is this for, and how would they use it, it was all over the place (getting better, but still). Steve Jobs was not an engineer, but that may have been his strength. He did not get lost in technical detail; he focused on the user experience. Who is this for; how would they use it. Everything should flow from there. Apple's commercials show that strongly. Microsoft's commercials are as confused as its development teams.
Guinevere 12th March 2014, 01:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Microsoft's commercials are as confused as its development teams.

Word.
Nexxo 12th March 2014, 12:54 Quote
...which is another example. Is it a word processor, or a desktop publishing program? Or is it both? Then why Publisher?
rollo 12th March 2014, 13:03 Quote
The fact they made a advert at all about it shows its a competitor, However much people on here may dismiss it.

If that was about the Ipad I could understand it or the Samsung Tablets. But its about a cheap Chromebook.

Surface pro has still sold more than the Surface RT at last check that must be the biggest failure for Microsoft, A product thats twice as expensive has more sales. That Alone should tell them that consumers do not want RT.
Nexxo 12th March 2014, 13:16 Quote
If they unlocked the desktop, people would be all over the RT.

It's about meeting expectations. I would say that the Chromebook and Surface RT are aimed at the same market: a no-fuss, low maintenance lightweight productivity device with good battery life. Neither has a wide range of apps. Both have their limitations.

But the Chromebook is basically a netbook with a new OS that people have no expectations of besides what it says on the box. The Surface RT is a tablet however, that runs Windows. So people expect it to have lots of shiny apps like the iPad, and the power and flexibility of a Windows PC. People expect more of the Surface RT.

And it actually is not that bad at meeting some of these expectations, but you wouldn't know it through the Microsoft adverts which basically show nothing. The Chromebook has some important --and totally preventable-- shortcomings, but they are not revealed either (unless you owned one, like I did. In the end it was too flawed. I now have a Surface RT which does all I need it to do). But it's Google, and Google, like Apple, is shiny and hip. Microsoft is boring and clunky. Expectations.
rollo 12th March 2014, 15:30 Quote
If been Shiny and hip means more $ in shareholders pockets they will take that every day Nexxo.

Truth is we can talk all day and night about its shortfalls or up points, Facts are nobody really wants one ( the surface rt) I dout even 1-2mil sales would be good enough for Microsoft. They would of been aiming for the 8-10mil sales. People worked out there write down cost as around 4million units. So they were aiming high.

Casual Consumer is who Microsoft needs to target, Tech people either want a tablet like the Surface RT or they do not thats a simple fact. If it was real windows at the price point it would be more appealing to the tech market.

Id consider the Surface pro a success and Microsoft probably does also they are catching up to Sony and Samsung in high end laptop sales.

Surface RT needs to be reworked or not made anymore. $130 for a modem is more than Apple charges for its 4g versions. Apple level pricing has not worked for anyone but Apple and theres no reason to suggest that will ever change.

Apple has a loyal following of rich young people who can afford to buy it. No other company has really shown that level of success in high end tablets or high end smartphones.
Nexxo 12th March 2014, 15:39 Quote
I know that people don't want one and that it has not sold well. We're talking about why. Most people really don't know it exists. Those who do have heard negative stories. Show one to people, and what it does, and they are pleasantly surprised. Some even buy one. I have made some converts just by showing people my device (and yes, I have emphasised the lack of apps, the closed nature of the desktop, all that. Turns out many people don't care).

The Surface RT is just a glaring example of how not to market a product. Closing the desktop was another epic mistake that only Microsoft seems capable of making.

Microsoft has been targetting the casual consumer --it's why "power users" are now in spasms of apoplexy about Windows 8. I agree that the Surface 2 needs a price drop and a change to an Atom CPU with full-fat Windows. That isn't going to happen though; Microsoft has big plans for Windows RT and Windows Phone. It is playing the long game. But on the upside, the Pro 2 is already a lot better than the Pro 1, battery life wise, and the Pro 3 will be better (and hopefully cheaper) still. By the time technology has advanced enough to make a Surface Pro at Surface RT price, weight and battery life, Microsoft will have had a lot of time to refine the design. That is when it will really have a contender on its hands.
rollo 12th March 2014, 16:14 Quote
Where will the competition be by then? If the technology allows MS to do that then it allows others like Samsung and Apple to do the same.

What the chromebook does is irelivent they are not fighting the same battleground. High end tablets theres 2 competitors it has to do something to beat them both and id imagine it needs to do something quickly.

That and learn how to market a product would be a step in the right direction.
Corky42 12th March 2014, 17:14 Quote
I have to say i agree with Rollo, when he asks where will the competition be by then.

It kind of comes back to what i said about Microsoft always being late to the party, sure they eventual get there, but by that time so have the competition, or they have tarnished the product with previous versions.
IIRC the first iPad came from nowhere and hit the ground running. It seem to me, most of the time Microsoft stumbles along trying to improve thing as they go along.
Nexxo 12th March 2014, 22:40 Quote
Those who forget the past, are easily impressed by the present. :p

The iPad did not come out of nowhere. It was the end product of a lot of experimentation with the Apple Newton (which begat copycats such as PalmPilot), and benefited from a market created and built by the iPhone (the iPhone, in turn, benefited from a lot of R&D aimed at developing the iPad).

And it is easy to recognise success in hindsight. At the time, many people were pretty sceptical of the iPad. For giggles, do a search of the first reactions to the iPad on this forum (here and here are some).

You could argue that the Surface is like Apple's Newton. Great idea, but a bit ahead of the required technology so compromises end up being made (different ones in case of the RT than the Pro). In two years' time the technology will have caught up. Microsoft will have a tablet that can do double duty as a full-fledged PC simply by dropping it in a dock (or, if that is too retro for you, communicate with a desktop monitor and keyboard+mouse setup wirelessly). The iPad and Android tablets can't do that, because theirs is basically not a desktop functional OS. So by that time the iPad and Android tablets will have to really have moved on conceptually, not just technologically, and that is harder than you think.

If Steve Jobs was still around, that would be a no-brainer for him (I really think that people underestimate the genius he was). But I feel that Apple is losing momentum lately. The latest iPad and iPhone are just faster, thinner, lighter versions, but conceptually they haven't evolved much since they came out in 2007 and 2010 respectively. Google has the advantage of being prepared to throw just about anything at the wall to see what sticks, so if anyone can pull a surprise rabbit out of the hat, it's them, but they have to get lucky. Microsoft meanwhile has a lot of creative talent, but it fails to listen to them every ****ing time. However that may change under Terry Myerson on the OS side, and under Nadella's leadership. Time will tell.
jrs77 12th March 2014, 23:24 Quote
I'm still waiting for a tablet with a lightweight OS that let's us use external storage, mouse and keyboard via USB.
Also, have some standard-software like an office-suite a zip/rar/etc and ofc a decent file-manager.

Basically, take a notebook and slim it down with a sub 10W APU, but retain standard-features like mentioned above.

Microsoft is on the right way with the Surface Pro, but they need to slim down the OS and pack a smaller CPU into the device. Cut the price by some $200 aswell. Some $600 for 64GB-version would be just about right.
Nexxo 12th March 2014, 23:45 Quote
The Surface RT is closest to what you are looking for.
jrs77 13th March 2014, 00:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
The Surface RT is closest to what you are looking for.

Crappy screen, crappy SoC and I definately wan't to be able to use standard x86/x64 software.

So yeah, I'm definately looking for something closer to the Surface Pro. With one of the new Atoms like the E3827 the Surface Pro would be totally fine for office and mediaplayback, and it would heavily lower the price to use this $50 Atom instead of the $300 i5.
The 10W Atom E3845 would be even better with it's 4C/4T and we'd look at the $600-device I'm looking for.
Corky42 13th March 2014, 08:51 Quote
@Nexxo, I get what your saying about the iPad came from the newton, but everything can be traced back to something else if we go back far enough. The point i was trying to make was the iPad came from nowhere and hit the ground running from a sales point of view, and in the way people perceived it, i would hazard a guess most Jo Blogs thought the concept was new.

I do agree that since then though, they haven't managed to capture that same feeling, that same buzz that surrounded the iPhone/iPad, but then i guess it's hard to replicate that again when all they do is bring out a slightly better version than yesterdays one.
Nexxo 13th March 2014, 13:02 Quote
It's a hard trick. And I agree with you (see, it does happen :p) that Microsoft does just not have that skill. I cannot imagine any time that Microsoft had people queuing up in stores for their product since Windows 95 (I don't know how old you were then, so how much you remember, but it was mad. People were literally queuing up clutching those light blue boxes in front of the tills in stores that opened up at midnight specifically for W95 launch day. All for an operating system). The seniors in Microsoft have been complacently coasting on that former glory ever since --they are the guys that need to be fired. Microsoft needs staff that are lean and hungry, not fat and conceited. Until then, Microsoft just cannot engage people the way Apple or Google manage to.
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