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Intel announces enthusiast-grade 730 Series SSDs

Intel announces enthusiast-grade 730 Series SSDs

Intel's enthusiast-grade 730 Series SSDs, available in 240GB and 480GB capacities, leave no room for doubt with their branding.

Intel has announced the impending availability of a new breed of enthusiast-grade solid-state drives (SSDs), the Intel 730 Series, which includes technology originally unveiled back in August at the Intel Developer Forum.

Although Intel had originally announced it would be demonstrating a means of overclocking SSD drives to improve performance at the event, with code even making it into an update of the Intel Extreme Tuning Utility, the company appears to have changed tack. Rather than offering user-configurable overclocking to end-users, the company is taking the technology and using it to offer pre-overclocked SSDs to performance enthusiasts.

The Intel 730 Series SSDs, adorned with a circuit-based skull just in case there was any doubt as to its target market, is the first to benefit. According to Intel's figures, the drives boast a 50 per cent boost in controller clock speed from 400MHz to 600MHz and a 20 per cent bump in the speed of the NAND flash memory clock from 83MHz to 100MHz. The result: claimed transfer rates of up to 550MB/s and reads of up to 89,000 input-output operations per second (IOPS.)

Despite factory-set overclocking - and, to be clear, there's no option to use the beta code in the XTU to change those figures yourself - Intel is also claiming market-leading reliability. According to the company's internal testing, the drive offers endurance rated at 70GB of writes a day compared to the industry average of 20GB. To back that up, the company is offering a full five-year warranty with each purchase.

UK pricing for the drives has yet to be confirmed, with Intel promising a 240GB model at $249.99 and a 480GB model for $479.99 in the US (around £150 and £287 respectively, excluding taxes.)

11 Comments

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Pookie 28th February 2014, 11:35 Quote
Pricing is good for both models. Get them reviewed as I think these look promising.
Phil Rhodes 28th February 2014, 12:29 Quote
Ooh, yes please.
Hustler 28th February 2014, 12:40 Quote
I can't get my head around the fact that you can 'overclock' hard drives.
Gareth Halfacree 28th February 2014, 12:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
I can't get my head around the fact that you can 'overclock' hard drives.
Why not? The controller's an ARM chip - overclockable like any other processor - and the storage in an SSD is a form of RAM, albeit non-volatile. Now, overclocking a *mechanical* hard drive, *that'd* be a challenge...
Dogbert666 28th February 2014, 14:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie
Pricing is good for both models. Get them reviewed as I think these look promising.

Should be with us soon
Pookie 28th February 2014, 14:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogbert666
Should be with us soon

Looking back it reads as though I'm making demands lol
Dogbert666 28th February 2014, 17:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie
Looking back it reads as though I'm making demands lol

Haha, it's cool, we were already arranging it prior to the article going up anyway :)
Shangri-La 1st March 2014, 21:10 Quote
Didn't James Gorbold question the wisdom of overclocking SSDs in a recent CPC editorial, it seemed to make sense when I read it.
toolio20 1st March 2014, 21:55 Quote
"Rather than offering user-configurable overclocking to end-users, the company is flipping off the enthusiast community and keeping the technology to itself in order to shill pre-overclocked SSDs to e-peen comparison junkies."
mclean007 3rd March 2014, 06:45 Quote
I can't argue with the numbers, but equally I can't help thinking it is a bit of marketing spin to sell something as "overclocked" when it has a factory applied (and locked) "overclock". Overclocking means running something beyond the clock speed specified by its manufacturer. In "factory overclocked" GPUs, this kind of makes sense, since the OEM is pushing the chip harder than nvidia or AMD specified, but in this case, isn't Intel just selling a device which is specified to run faster?! It's as if they sold you a 2.8 GHz processor as a 2 GHz chip with "MASSIVE 40% FACTORY OVERCLOCK!!!!!111!!"
Dogbert666 3rd March 2014, 12:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclean007
I can't argue with the numbers, but equally I can't help thinking it is a bit of marketing spin to sell something as "overclocked" when it has a factory applied (and locked) "overclock". Overclocking means running something beyond the clock speed specified by its manufacturer. In "factory overclocked" GPUs, this kind of makes sense, since the OEM is pushing the chip harder than nvidia or AMD specified, but in this case, isn't Intel just selling a device which is specified to run faster?! It's as if they sold you a 2.8 GHz processor as a 2 GHz chip with "MASSIVE 40% FACTORY OVERCLOCK!!!!!111!!"

This is pretty much what I thought of it too.
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