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Intel to demo SSD overclocking at IDF

Intel to demo SSD overclocking at IDF

Intel promises to reveal how solid-state storage devices can be overclocked to boost performance as part of its IDF 2013 event in San Francisco next month.

Intel has announced that it will be opening up a new era in extreme overclocking with the first public demonstration of how to overclock solid-state storage devices.

Part of the Intel Developer Forum San Francisco, session AISO001 Overclocking Unlocked Intel Core Processors for High Performance Gaming and Content Creation is designed to demonstrate how a few little tweaks can increase the performance of the company's Haswell-era desktop and mobile processors. Accordingly, it includes live demonstrations and expert tips from hardware partner Asus, and as one of its key features will have one of the first ever demonstrations of overclocking on the Ivy Bridge-based Core i7-4xxx Extreme Edition processor family.

It's an almost-buried bulletpoint on the schedule that draws the most interest, however: 'demonstrating overclocking SSD technology.' At the session, it seems, Intel will be showing users how to boost the performance of solid-state storage devices - increasing the data throughput, but at a potential cost to the lifespan of the hardware.

Although overclocking is far from new, storage devices haven't been an obvious target thus far. In the past, people may have overclocked storage controllers, but the drives themselves have largely been left alone - aside from the usual tweaks to enable optional features such as acoustic management and power saving.

Intel, it seems, is keen to break down that barrier and is promising to show anyone interested - from hardware partners and press right down to enthusiasts - just how to unlock hidden performance potential, presumably using the company's own-brand SSDs or possibly those of partner Asus. Sadly, those interested will have to attend the event: thus far, Intel has release no details of the session beyond a brief synopsis as part of the IDF schedule.

The session, which takes place on the 10th of September as part of the larger IDF13 San Francisco event, will also include the first public demonstration of Intel's AppTune Beta, a new feature of the company's Extreme Tuning Utility (XTU) first introduced with version 4.2 earlier this month.

8 Comments

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GravitySmacked 27th August 2013, 10:10 Quote
Well I've overclocked everything else so count me in!
flibblesan 27th August 2013, 10:31 Quote
Well the controller chips on the drives are ARM processors so could be overclocked. Would it be worth it though?
Platinum 27th August 2013, 11:23 Quote
I was under the impression the next gen i7 Extreme CPU's were Ivy Bridge E based not Haswell?
Gareth Halfacree 27th August 2013, 11:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Platinum
I was under the impression the next gen i7 Extreme CPU's were Ivy Bridge E based not Haswell?
So they are - my mistake. I'll fix that now, ta!
edzieba 27th August 2013, 13:19 Quote
Huh, I'd have thought the controller was tied in pretty tightly to the SATA clock.
digitaldunc 27th August 2013, 13:53 Quote
Hmm.

Interesting in theory, but I value my data integrity too much to potentially hose my SSD.

Beyond benchmarks, I see very niche appeal. SSDs are largely fast enough for desktop use, and enterprise would invest in gear with higher throughput, you'd think.
schmidtbag 27th August 2013, 14:45 Quote
I have a feeling overclocking the drive's controller wouldn't make a very big impact, and I never heard of the storage chips operating on a frequency (though, I wouldn't be surprised if they were). If overclocking the controller was simply the solution to better performance this entire time, I'm sure somebody would have figured that out a long time ago. When you consider that the different brands containing different controllers overall perform very similarly to each other, I think the bottleneck is more likely the storage chips themselves or the SATA interface rather than the controller.

Besides, doesn't anybody find it a little weird that Intel is *encouraging* overclocking? It wouldn't surprise me if they're trying to trick people into gaining another 20MB/s so their drives die out quicker in order to get more sales. Or, perhaps it's just a way to give people a reason to pick intel over their competitors. If intel becomes the only one to offer overclocking, that gives them an advantage.
fluxtatic 28th August 2013, 08:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitaldunc
Hmm.

Interesting in theory, but I value my data integrity too much to potentially hose my SSD.

Beyond benchmarks, I see very niche appeal. SSDs are largely fast enough for desktop use, and enterprise would invest in gear with higher throughput, you'd think.

I'm with you. I can't afford to keep extras around, so I don't have a machine that I can just blow up. Even more so, I wouldn't take the chance on blowing up my data, so count me out on this one.
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