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ECS unveils Durathon high-durability branding

ECS unveils Durathon high-durability branding

ECS' new Durathon branding will apply to all future boards, promising a denser and more moisture-resistant PCB, higher-lifespan capacitors and an even more stringent testing methodology.

Motherboard maker Elitegroup Computer Systems, better known by its initialism of ECS, has announced a new standard for high-durability hardware: Durathon.

A somewhat clunky portmanteau of 'durable' and 'marathon,' Durathon is the company's latest attempt at making ultra-stable motherboards based on tweaked hardware designs. Combining two revised design elements with a more thorough testing regime, ECS claims Durathon-based boards will be among the most reliable available on the open market.

The first aspect of a Durathon board is the circuit board material itself. Using bi-directional weaved glass fabric instead of standard unidirectional glass fabric boards, which serves to reduce the gaps between each strand of the fabric in order to reduce permeability, means a resistance to high levels of humidity - which can cause delamination, corrosion or even short circuiting - some three times greater than previously possible. Secondly, ECS claims to have revised the design of its solid-state capacitors, rating them to 200,000 hours compared to 32,000 hours for electrolytic-based caps and offering a peak operating temperature of 100˚C - although not, obviously, for 200,000 hours.

All Durathon boards will also undergo the company's latest revision of the Marathon Test, originally unveiled in May last year for the Nonstop guarantee attached to Black series hardware. A modified version of the awkwardly named 'Super Marathon 3x Stability' test, the latest 1.5K Marathon Test will see the boards go through 1,507 independent test points - the strictest reliability testing ECS has ever undertaken, the company claims. As with the original Marathon testing, the new boards will also be given extreme temperature resistance testing that sees the motherboards undergo active testing at temperatures 10˚C higher and lower than those used in industry standard test procedures.

While this isn't the first time ECS has tried to use stringent testing and claims of increased durability as a sales technique, Durathon is going significantly further than the company's previous efforts: where the Nonstop guarantee applied only to Black series hardware, ECS has promised to roll out Durathon across its entire motherboard product line-up. How much difference Durathon makes compared to competing products in real-world usage scenarios, however, is questionable - despite the company's exhortations that the technology can improve day-to-day reliability and, it is claimed, '[solve] common PC hardware problems before they can even occur.'

Additional details, including a list of Durathon boards, is available on the company's official microsite.

7 Comments

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Maki role 11th April 2013, 11:15 Quote
Interesting, although I can't seem to shake the notion that 'Durathon' sounds like a brand of contraceptives...
Corky42 11th April 2013, 12:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maki role
Interesting, although I can't seem to shake the notion that 'Durathon' sounds like a brand of contraceptives...

Damn you beat me to it

Though i do question if people really need a MoBo resistant to high levels of humidity or caps rated for over 22 years of use.
jrs77 11th April 2013, 12:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Though i do question if people really need a MoBo resistant to high levels of humidity or caps rated for over 22 years of use.

Depends on where you're living really. In Indochina or south america there's much higher levels of humidity then in EU/US ;)
Tyinsar 11th April 2013, 14:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Article
A somewhat clunky portmanteau of 'durable' and 'marathon,'
To me it sounds like a weird mix of Duron and Athlon.
Jimbob 11th April 2013, 14:56 Quote
This sounds just like the existing features on existing motherboards, Gigabyte have had high humidity tight weaving on even their low-mid range boards for ages now.
tad2008 11th April 2013, 17:13 Quote
For me this just further confirms just how poor quality their boards have always been and that only now are they finally rising their quality to what everyone else has already been doing for years. Good on them for doing so and it's just a shame mobo makers like this are still around when seemingly better companies like Abit have since been lost.

Either way I'll still be avoiding ECS boards and sticking with the likes of Asus, Gigabyte and MSI.
damien c 11th April 2013, 18:23 Quote
Never seen or used a ECS board, so I am not sure what they are like but atleast if they had issues in the past they are atleast working on it.

I can't even find anywhere that sell's them in the uk.
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