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ECS adds Nonstop guarantee to Black series

ECS adds Nonstop guarantee to Black series

EliteGroup's Nonstop branding comes with guaranteed electrostatic immunity and the ability to operate at 50°C ambient - but does it really make the boards more reliable?

Elitegroup Computer Systems (ECS) has announced a new brand name for its top-end motherboards: Nonstop.

Based around a new and more rigorous testing procedure ECS calls the 'Super Marathon 3X Stability Stress Test,' boards marketed with the Nonstop branding will guarantee improved reliability and elongated lifespans over the company's standard hardware.

As well as 'Super Marathon 3x Stability,' the Nonstop testing procedure includes the 'Sahara Severe Test' where the board is operated in a 50°C environment to make sure high ambient temperatures don't cause stability issues. Mind you, if your ambient temperature is 50°C you've likely got bigger issues to worry about than whether your PC has crashed.

To ensure its premium boards can pass the testing procedure, ECS has opted to use long-life solid capacitors dubbed 'Apache,' along with an electrostatic discharge (ESD) prevention circuit called 'Thor.' This circuit, ECS claims, provides full protection against electrostatic discharge damage and follows ESD guidelines laid down by no lesser an authority on the matter than heaven-botherer NASA.

The Nonstop branding will be found on all ECS Black series motherboards, with ECS retrospectively certifying its existing Black series boards including the X79R-AX, X79R-AX Deluxe, A990FXM-A, A990FXM-A Deluxe, A75F-A, H61H2-A2 Deluxe, Z77H2-AX, Z77H2-A2X, and Z77H2-A2X deluxe models.

What ECS has yet to provide, however, is evidence that its Nonstop testing procedure results in hardware which offers a real-world improvement over non-Nonstop boards. While the ability to run in a 50°C environment is undoubtedly impressive, it's a small target market that will be looking to do such a thing.

Should the Nonstop testing procedure deliver a board which is truly more reliable than the competition, however, ECS could have a serious advantage over its less rigorously tested rivals.

10 Comments

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tad2008 25th May 2012, 11:00 Quote
Now there is a motherboard manufacturer I thought had disappeared and faded in to obscurity. Haven't touched their boards for what must be close to 10 years because of their renowned instability and overheating issues, lets hope this is for real and not just marketing.
Phalanx 25th May 2012, 11:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by tad2008
Now there is a motherboard manufacturer I thought had disappeared and faded in to obscurity. Haven't touched their boards for what must be close to 10 years because of their renowned instability and overheating issues, lets hope this is for real and not just marketing.

If they weren't getting it right, then I doubt they'd make this claim. Otherwise they'll be losing money left, right and centre. :) Time will tell.
K404 25th May 2012, 11:12 Quote
I have an ECS Z77 and it does NOT suck ;) They need to work on availability, but the product is good.

The best thing for daily users is that there aren't 40 billion billion obscure BIOS options.... it's fairly "fire n forget" :)
Sheiken 25th May 2012, 13:00 Quote
K7S5A!
jb0 25th May 2012, 13:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheiken
K7S5A!

Oh god, the nightmares! I had one of those. No END of troubles from it.
feathers 25th May 2012, 13:47 Quote
Next DFI will be posting news of a Z77 in UV green with PWM heatpipe extending out the rear of the computer case.
warejon9 25th May 2012, 15:41 Quote
I've seen ECS stuff on other sites, but do they actually sell this stuff in the UK?
Gareth Halfacree 25th May 2012, 15:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by warejon9
I've seen ECS stuff on other sites, but do they actually sell this stuff in the UK?
Yup.
abezors 27th May 2012, 17:15 Quote
Interested to hear about the "Thor" ESD protection feature. Would this sort of thing likely become standard in time? Not that static has ever been an issue with builds, but it'd be nice to have anyway.
mclean007 28th May 2012, 10:48 Quote
Quote:
Mind you, if your ambient temperature is 50°C you've likely got bigger issues to worry about than whether your PC has crashed.
True, but it isn't really about ambient temperature, is it? Unless you have phase change or TEC cooling, the temperature inside your case will ALWAYS be above room temperature, so on a hot day it is not unimaginable that a high end system with barely adequate cooling, working hard, could reach case temps of 50C.

Anyway, it's a stress test - I'm unlikely to beast my computer at 100% for 72 hours straight, but it would be comforting to know that it could handle it if I did. It means whatever I do ask of it is likely to be less demanding than what it has been shown to be capable of. Take an analogy - if I go bungee jumping, I don't just want to know that the rope has been tested with something equal in mass to me - I'd like to know there's a good margin of error there too!
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