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Intel's Haswell chips tipped for June launch

Intel's Haswell chips tipped for June launch

Intel's Haswell processor family may be launching in June, following an unexplained schedule slip from the originally-planned April release date.

Intel's next-generation Haswell processor family appears to have suffered from a last-minute schedule slip, with the company now tipped to unveil the first processors in the new family in May ahead of a June launch.

Originally, it was thought that Intel would formally unveil its Haswell products early this year with a view to launching the chips in April, but sources speaking to VR-Zone have suggested that Intel's plans have changed to a later June launch. While nothing official is coming out of Intel - which, true to tradition, refuses to comment on 'industry rumour or speculation regarding unannounced products' - it is thought the company could be planning to show off the chips at Computex 2013 ahead of a formal launch on the 2nd of June.

Haswell is Intel's latest processor family, designed to offer design tweaks on the same process size as Ivy Bridge, itself a process-shrunk revision of the Sandy Bridge architecture. Part of Intel's 'tick-tock' design process - during which it launches a new processor design one year before shrinking it to a smaller process size the next, repeating in two-year cycles - Haswell introduces some exciting new features to the company's processor line-up including transactional memory technology, a high-performance L4 cache layer, and ultra-efficient models with a 10W TDP along with boosted graphics performance and the 'Haswell New Instructions' (HNI) instruction set architecture extensions.

The chipset designed for use with Haswell processors, Lynx Point, is claimed to include integrated USB 3.0 support for six individual ports, six on-board SATA 6Gb/s ports and quad-read Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) support, alongside a next-generation implementation of Intel's vPro hardware-based security and management system on the enterprise-grade implementations. As with Haswell itself, Lynx Point comes with claimed power draw improvements and a reduced chipset size, along with tweaks that are claimed to improve solid-state drive (SSD) performance compared to previous-generation chipsets.

The upshot, Intel claims, is a fourth-generation Core processor family with significantly improved performance and lower power draw across the whole range of server, desktop, laptop and tablet devices. With Intel already well ahead of rival AMD in the performance stakes, that's undeniably impressive - providing the Haswell parts live up to their claimed potential.

For those hoping to cheaply upgrade to a Haswell chip, however, some bad news: the processor will require a Lynx Point chipset to operate, and uses the new LGA1150 socket type - making it incompatible with existing motherboards.

14 Comments

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b1candy 2nd January 2013, 12:22 Quote
quad-read Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) support? What's this?
Nikumba 2nd January 2013, 12:28 Quote
My thoughts to, but wiki article full of blurb http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Peripheral_Interface_Bus

But looking at the advantages says about full duplex comms, low voltage less connections so could be could for performance, though wait and see
b1candy 2nd January 2013, 12:32 Quote
I looked at the wiki, but would actually like to know what it means in terms of affect on normal day-to-day usage, and how the new version is different to the old and what that means overall. All the other features mentioned in the article list have been studied to death on other sites, so I'm wondering why SPI was called out.
r3loaded 2nd January 2013, 13:15 Quote
SPI is a low-power serial interface faster than I2C that's typically use in embedded systems. It's usually used to connect up sensors like accelerometers. Alongside the 10W parts, I'm guessing it's part of Intel's plan to make Core processors viable for use in tablets by supporting this interface on-chip.
Corky42 2nd January 2013, 13:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1candy
I looked at the wiki, but would actually like to know what it means in terms of affect on normal day-to-day usage, and how the new version is different to the old and what that means overall. All the other features mentioned in the article list have been studied to death on other sites, so I'm wondering why SPI was called out.

From my very little understanding its mainly a power saving feature, AFAIK its used instead of SMBus when reading things like information on RAM.
SPI is a upgraded version of SMBus in turn its a upgraded version of I²C
Alecto 2nd January 2013, 17:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1candy
I looked at the wiki, but would actually like to know what it means in terms of affect on normal day-to-day usage, and how the new version is different to the old and what that means overall. All the other features mentioned in the article list have been studied to death on other sites, so I'm wondering why SPI was called out.

It means what it says - the SPI controller is able to read 4 inputs simultaneously, thereby quadrupling the read speed (of things attached to SPI bus, such as system ROM). It means **** all for your everyday use.
ch424 2nd January 2013, 19:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
SPI is a upgraded version of SMBus in turn its a upgraded version of I²C

While you're correct that SMBus is derived from I2C, SPI is completely independent of both of them. It has very little in common: single master, separate read and write channels, arbitrary clock speed, no requirement for open-collector interface or pull-up resistors...

As already pointed out by r3loaded, this quad-SPI interface is most likely for low bandwidth peripherals like accelerometers, a touchscreen controller or a compass.
Corky42 2nd January 2013, 20:28 Quote
I stand corrected ;)
Though i was going on what info i got from the wiki.
Where it mentions "Higher throughput than I²C or SMBus" so just assumed it was related.
Madness_3d 2nd January 2013, 23:00 Quote
Shame it's been pushed back I was hoping to grab one of these when they come out. Time to jump off the AMD Bandwagon for the first time me thinks...
Yslen 3rd January 2013, 05:43 Quote
The comments section for bit-tech articles really is dragging up the average for the rest of the internet isn't it? It's refreshing to come here after the usual rage/flame/troll responses on just about every other site. Just thought I'd mention it.
Si_the-dude 4th January 2013, 12:33 Quote
Is anyone thinking about upgrading from Sandybridge or even Ivy to Haswell?
NetSphere 7th January 2013, 00:31 Quote
I guess the upgrade will depend on the improvement % from Ivy.

For now, I'll forget about Haswell until the reviews starts popping up everywhere. I've had enough of "wait for it, wait for it... wait for it... oops, another delay.... wait for it and here is another delay.. and then done!".
OcSurfe 7th January 2013, 23:12 Quote
not sure if ill upgrade happy with my 3770k,
but as always its all dependant on the price to performance increase
adidan 15th February 2013, 20:46 Quote
Looking forward to see how this gets on when it comes out, may finally 'convince' myself to move on from my trusty 1366 setup after bypassing sandy and ivy.

But then that would mean a shiny new GPU and monitor to make sure I get the most out of it, I mean it just would be rude not to. :)
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