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Samsung intros 'toggle-mode' SSD

Samsung intros 'toggle-mode' SSD

Samsung's latest SSD boosts capacity to 512GB and increases performance without upping the power draw.

Samsung has announced the launch of the world's first solid-state drive to use toggle-mode DDR NAND flash memory, which the company claims can significantly boost performance.

The company's latest SSD is a 512GB monster based around 32Gb chips manufactured on a 30nm process. They were first produced en masse in only November last year, and the specifications speak for themselves: while the device is somewhat hampered by a 3Gb/s SATA bus - unlike the devices due from SandForce later this year - the toggle-mode SSD is capable of 250MB/s sequential read speed and 220MB/s sequential write speed.

According to the company, the new toggle-mode memory improves performance without increased power consumption: the device uses the same energy as Samsung's previous 40nm 16Gb-based 256GB SSD.

Interestingly, the company also makes the claim that a new controller which can analyse "the frequency of use and preference of the user to automatically activate a low-power mode" during periods of downtime is capable of dropping the power requirements so much it can "extend a notebook's battery life for an hour or more."

Everything else you would expect from a modern SSD makes an appearance, including 256-bit AES encryption on-board and support for Intel's TRIM management function for enhanced performance and reliability.

Executive vice president of the company's memory marketing section Dong-Soo Jun claims that "early introduction of this state-of-the-art toggle[-mode] DDR solution will enable Samsung to play a major role in securing faster market acceptance of the new wave of high-end SSD technology."

Samsung is looking to begin volume production of the new 512GB SSD some time next month, although a firm launch date has yet to be announced - and pricing information has been conspicuous in its absence.

Are you impressed with Samsung's figures, or will you need to see independent verification before you laud the company's toggle-mode DDR technology as the way forward for SSDs? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

17 Comments

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Mr T 17th June 2010, 12:59 Quote
"Samsung's latest SSD boosts capacity to 512MB"

Should that be Gb? Hehe. What's the point though it saturates the 3Gb/s SATA bus?
tristanperry 17th June 2010, 13:01 Quote
Hehe I noticed that typo too ;)

512 GB and read/write speeds in the 200s could be a nice drive, even if it'll cost an unholy amount ^^
Gareth Halfacree 17th June 2010, 13:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr T
"Samsung's latest SSD boosts capacity to 512MB" Should that be Gb? Hehe.
Damnit. I was *so* careful to check, double-check, and triple-check the article body I didn't pay any attention to the image caption.
shanky887614 17th June 2010, 13:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr T
"Samsung's latest SSD boosts capacity to 512MB" Should that be Gb? Hehe.
Damnit. I was *so* careful to check, double-check, and triple-check the article body I didn't pay any attention to the image caption.

well it wasnt enough,
no use crying over spilt mik
neocleous 17th June 2010, 13:21 Quote
The tech in SSD's is moving really fast it seems like every day bit puts up some break through in the SSd sector, its such a shame they are still soooo expensive compared to traditional hard disks.
proxess 17th June 2010, 13:22 Quote
Nice to see people working like mad on the SSD technologies. Put them together and we'll have some kick ass SSDs soon.
Skiddywinks 17th June 2010, 13:30 Quote
Sigh. I don't want to sound like I am just posting the same thing over and over, but again, why the hell do companies not show off their random speeds? That's what matters. Although the size (512GB) is quite impressive in all fairness.

An hour extra battery life is impressive if true though, considering SSDs use such bare all power anyway.
LightningPete 17th June 2010, 13:42 Quote
i just which nand production was put forward and not one of them lines cut in the new cut everything and saving world we now live in...
These SSD's would make an absolute fortune for commericial and general consumer use, had they just threw themselves some stick at keeping the nand production high and ssd prices down.
These should be retailing at no more than £200 for the 512gb. But sadly we live in such a cost cutting world that people are cutting even the most profitable sectors of their organisations
Andy Mc 17th June 2010, 14:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by proxess
Nice to see people working like mad on the SSD technologies. Put them together and we'll have some kick ass SSDs soon.

Don't forget about ramping up production so the prices come down to acceptable levels.
B3CK 17th June 2010, 14:01 Quote
So, BT is gonna get us an in-depth review soon right?
Sebbo 17th June 2010, 14:27 Quote
3 things I don't like about current SSDs: the use of NAND, the small(er) size, and the huge cost. So far, this drive has addressed two of those: good size for system and programs, and a non-volatile DDR over NAND.

For the current price in Australia of SSD drives in excess of 250GB, I can build a complete HTPC (including a Lian Li case for drives near the same capacity as this), so if Samsung can get this out at a good price, it will definitely be a winner in my books
l3v1ck 17th June 2010, 14:45 Quote
If it's hampered by SATA3 Gb/s, why make it with that interface?
Vigilante 17th June 2010, 16:08 Quote
I hate it when companies demonstrate performance of solid state devices by quoting their sequential speed. In 99% of cases, it is not sequential speed that makes SSD's superior to hard disks, it's random read and write.

Until manufacturers start honestly quoting decent random speeds for their drives, I'll just keep waiting until benchmarks come along and (most likely) show the drive being trounced by intel and sandforce devices.
TSR2 17th June 2010, 17:40 Quote
So, wish list,
Crazy OC'ed Sapphire 5970, £1000
i7-980X, £1000
This, also probably £1000.
How many organs is it possible to sell?
Burdman27911 17th June 2010, 23:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by neocleous
The tech in SSD's is moving really fast it seems like every day bit puts up some break through in the SSd sector, its such a shame they are still soooo expensive compared to traditional hard disks.

If I recall, Intel should be starting production of 25nm base NAND this year which will continue the trend of increased performance and decreased prices. I think things will start to look pretty good for SSDs in late 2011 or early 2012.

This new drive really is tempting me to purchase for my 3D rendering workstation here at work. My workstation is HDD limited when trying to compile the rendered frames from my render farm.
Farfalho 17th June 2010, 23:58 Quote
Almost everyone although you won't be alive to profit from them xD

Cost figures for this piece of epicness?
Krayzie_B.o.n.e. 19th June 2010, 19:02 Quote
With every state of the art PC component costing $1000.00 including the dam PC case (Thermaltake Level 10)
how are we supposed to afford all this stuff on a PC gamers salary? Nice advancement in tech but how about you lower the price already.

512GB SSD is great but at $1000.00 I'll stick to HDD
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