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Global Foundries announces ambitious expansion plans

Global Foundries announces ambitious expansion plans

Douglas Grose, CEO of Global Foundries, and Ibrahim Ajami, CEO of ATIC present the latest 28nm 300mm wafer from Global Foundries.

COMPUTEX 2010 Global Foundries, the manufacturing company formed when AMD decided to become purely a chip design outfit, this morning announced an ambitious program of upgrades to its factories.

It will increase both the scale and complexity of its fabrication plants (fabs for short), meaning companies which don't own their own plants - increasingly common in the high-tech world - have access to better and better manufacturing processes for their wares.

With a current global capacity of 110,000 300mm wafers per month split between Fab 1 in Germany and Fab 7 in Singapore, the addition of the new Fab 8 in New York will bring an extra 42,000 wafers when it’s finished in 2012. This will further increase with the construction of an additional cleanroom Fab 1 Germany making it the largest in Europe – something Global Foundries classes as its ‘Gigalab’. The extra 110,000 sq foot of space in clean room adds 25 per cent capacity, increasing output from 60,000 to 80,000 wafers a month by mid-2011. The Dresden lab is still focused on 40 and 45nm process manufacturing, moving to 28nm by next year. The advantage of extra production volume means that Global Foundaries can learn faster to improve yields.

Despite the fact it’s not even finished yet, expansion of Fab 8 in New York will also take place in “phase 2” of its construction, adding 40% more cleanroom space and focusing on 28nm production, before moving to 22/20nm and below, ultimately increasing production output to 60,000 wafers a month by 2013.

At its Computex press conference, Global Foundries stated that its new High-k metal gate techniques on 32nm and 28nm are in the early introduction phase, but this process was also “design compatible” with 45/40nm production and accounts for a 10-15 per cent die size reduction and transistor performance equal to Intel (although it's arguably coming two years behind Intel).

Global Foundries continues to use volume immersion lithography and double patterning with 32nm and will move to Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) in 2011 with mask and resist technique.

How do you feel Global Foundaries stacks up against its largest competitor, TSMC? Can either catch Intel’s current manufacturing lead? Let us know your thoughts, in the forums.

Global Foundries announces ambitious expansion plans Global Foundaries announce expansion of production facilities
Global Foundaries 28nm 300mm test wafer was on show

6 Comments

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l3v1ck 2nd June 2010, 04:14 Quote
Quote:
before moving to 22/20nm and below, ultimately increasing production output to 60,000 wafers a month by 2013.
Yay! Bring on the small transistors. Anything that helps lower power consumption is always welcome.
Quote:
How do you feel Global Foundaries stacks up against its largest competitor, TSMC?
Given that TSMC's 40mn chips for ATI and Nvidia have fallen flat on their power hungry arses, I'd say Global Foundaries have a good future. I wouldn't be surprised if ATI or Nvidia (if not both) use them for their next die size.
Skiddywinks 2nd June 2010, 04:43 Quote
I see good things in the future for GF. And the split couldn't have come at a better time, what with TMSC's recent serious of disasters.
1ad7 2nd June 2010, 06:43 Quote
wow it looks like AMD made a great move splitting out the foundry. Bravo!
Xir 2nd June 2010, 07:55 Quote
Hmmm, so if GF-FAB1 was AMD-FAB36...is the expansion the move back adding the old FAB30*?

*(the 200mm "home of the athlon" thart was closed a few years ago)
rickysio 2nd June 2010, 09:45 Quote
So that's what the AMD building near my house (in Singapore) does?
Xir 2nd June 2010, 11:27 Quote
GloFo bougt two manufacturers... AMD (two Dresden/Germany plants and one in building process in upstate New York) and Chartered Semiconductors Manufacturing in Singapore. AMD also had dicing, testing and packaging facilities all over SE-Asia.
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