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Blizzard "listening to feedback" on Real ID

Blizzard "listening to feedback" on Real ID

Blizzard wants to force Battle.net users to show their real names on the forums.

Blizzard has responded to the torrent of complaints it’s received concerning recently announced plansto force Battle.net forum members to post under their real names, as part of the Real ID feature.

Speaking to Gamasutra, a Blizzard representative said the company is "definitely listening to player feedback."

"[We] will be carefully monitoring how people are using the service," claimed the rep. "Real ID is a new and different concept for Blizzard gamers - and for us as well - and our goal is to create a social gaming service that players want to use."

This is not the first time Blizzard has announced plans for a social gaming service that ties into Battle.net either. The company previously hintedthe integration of Facebook with their Real ID service in Starcraft II and other games.

Many have suggested that the issue can be avoided by simply registering a fake name when signing up to the service. However, the Blizzard rep pointed out that it has plans to try to enforce the use of legitimate names.

"We have multiple teams here who will be monitoring the forums and looking for inappropriate names," the rep explained. "When the situation does arise, our community and customer service representatives will investigate and determine if any action is needed."

In an attempt to calm the fury, a Blizzard employee revealed his own name. Quick to respond, WoW Riot were able to find and publish many of Wipple's details including his address, phone number, age, family and even the music and films he likes, along with the links to the pages they used to do so. We’ve not linked to this article out of respect for Wipple’s privacy.

Are Blizzard going about the creation of social gaming the right way, or is the ease with which Micah Wipple's details were found and made available proof of the dangers of their system? Let us know your thoughts in the forums.

Thanks to our own forum member ImInTheZoneBaby for pointing out the WoW Riot article.

48 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
south side sammy 8th July 2010, 11:36 Quote
Coming from a community that maps and mods games...... I'd like to pick on EA here..... they always keep on saying " we listen to the community" blah, blah, blah and then they go right ahead and screw things up anyways..... kinda like Obama and the morons he has surrounding him.
mi1ez 8th July 2010, 11:37 Quote
Micah Wipple, what were you expecting?
NuTech 8th July 2010, 11:41 Quote
The more I read about RealID, the more I think the entire idea is slightly broken. Admittedly I only played WoW for a short time, but here is what I think the problem is:

With RealID you are able to do what a lot of players have wanted to do for a long time: Cross-server chat, cross-faction chat and cross-game chat. All these things have been long requested by the player base.

However, Blizzard requiring the use to RealID just to take advantage of those features is asking too much from their customers. If a player wishes keep his real identity hidden, he can't take advantage of any of those features.

To make matters worse, not only are you giving away your full identity just so you can chat to a guildy currently playing a character on a different server - but you're also giving away your identity to all the people on his/her RealID list too.

Surely Blizzard should know by now that their playerbase doesn't consist of the most hinged people in the world (and I'm putting that kindly!), and giving away your identity on Facebook is nothing like doing the same on their servers.
yakyb 8th July 2010, 11:50 Quote
the Internet is a dangerous place no need to be posting details, especially when situations have arisen such as murders over MMo's

if one case comes out that someone managed to track someone down using their realid what would blizzard be liable for
[USRF]Obiwan 8th July 2010, 11:55 Quote
Not to mention Identity theft..
LeMaltor 8th July 2010, 12:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yakyb
the Internet is a dangerous place no need to be posting details, especially when situations have arisen such as murders over MMo's

if one case comes out that someone managed to track someone down using their realid what would blizzard be liable for

It would defiantly be a facilitator of crime.
NuTech 8th July 2010, 12:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeMaltor
It would defiantly be a facilitator of crime.
I doubt it.

A lot of people seem to think they have a law degree and are jumping all over Blizzard spouting 'facts' regarding EU privacy laws, Data Protection Act, criminal statutes etc etc etc.

Two things you have to remember - 1) ActivisionBlizzard have an army of lawyers who are a lot smarter than you or I and whatever decisions they make will be thoroughly vetted before they are made public 2) Forums are completely optional and you don't have to use them. It's not part of the service you pay for, it's not compulsory and all posts prior to the change will remain anonymous.

I'm sure before you're allowed to post on any of their new forums, there will be about half a dozen warnings and liability waivers stating what you're about to do will make your full name public.

Of course, that is if these changes go live in their current state (which I don't think they will do - I suspect Blizzard will allow a one-time unchangeable alias).
bowman 8th July 2010, 12:40 Quote
As if.

They've already lost their chance to get me to pay for (their first little bit) of SC2 - now they can try to win back my money for Diablo 3.
ImInTheZoneBaby 8th July 2010, 13:07 Quote
Oooooh. I got a mention. Awesome. :D

But hmm, sounds to me like they're still going to go ahead with the whole idea of the Real ID forums, and It'll have to take something real bad or drastic to happen, to get them motivated to change their minds, it seems.
greigaitken 8th July 2010, 13:46 Quote
In real life there are consequences for your actions. Should you have similar consequences for similar actions online?
If i tell a guy in street to go f**k his mother he'll want to hit me if he thinks he's tougher. online, the same comment is just trash talk but the little guys get to backchat the big boys.
Should you have to stick by what you say online?
I'm not concerned at all about any "i'm gonna find out where you live and kick your ass" issues - thats no different from two guys fighting in front of some girl in the chippy at 4am.
I'm interested if there will be a bunch of lawsuits against people using perceived racial insults.
Altron 8th July 2010, 14:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
In real life there are consequences for your actions. Should you have similar consequences for similar actions online?
If i tell a guy in street to go f**k his mother he'll want to hit me if he thinks he's tougher. online, the same comment is just trash talk but the little guys get to backchat the big boys.
Should you have to stick by what you say online?
I'm not concerned at all about any "i'm gonna find out where you live and kick your ass" issues - thats no different from two guys fighting in front of some girl in the chippy at 4am.
I'm interested if there will be a bunch of lawsuits against people using perceived racial insults.

I'm not a WoW player, but I played plenty of its indirect predecessor Diablo II, and continue to play its other indirect predecessor Warcraft III.

People there are incredibly immature and stupid. It can often become a very hostile gaming environment. There are plenty of players who hold grudges. I often see blatant abuse of GHost bot admin powers (muting enemy players for no reason, kicking and banning a player who is beating them, turning off the bot to force everyone to disconnect if they are losing, etc.)

I just don't have faith that the young and immature players will hold grudges and go find ways to harass each other through other websites.

Right now, if you have a rough game with lots of trash talking, you can log off battle.net and it ends. Immediately. Or, even if you keep playing, you have tools available to prevent other players from following and harassing you after a game.

The original system implemented in SC2 Beta, IIRC, was decent. You had a gamertag and an e-mail address, like Steam. People could see your anonymous gamertag, and communicate with you, but if a trusted friend had your e-mail address, they could communicate at a closer level.

I have no qualms with that. I know the full names and have the phone numbers of several of my TF2 clanmates. But any random stranger? No way.
karx11erx 8th July 2010, 14:31 Quote
You have not linked the article out of respect for the man's privacy? If all that stuff can be found on the inet, you are apparently having more respect for his privacy than he does himself.
Infection 8th July 2010, 15:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuTech
2) Forums are completely optional and you don't have to use them. It's not part of the service you pay for, it's not compulsory and all posts prior to the change will remain anonymous.

1) Forums are completely optional
2) For some people they do pay for the service of being able to post. The ability to post on them and be a member rather then a lurker is only given to a member when they have paid for a World of Warcraft subscription, let's face it the WoW players are the ones that are actually causing this nonsense. 1378 pages in a few hours with about 95% of responses being negative?. (I believe you need to have a Valid CDKey on the other games Blizzard operates to post on those particular forums as well. The exception is Starcraft 2, I haven't posted there so I assume either it's unlocked to everyone or it requires a CDKey from another game to be activated on your Battle.net account).

If you read up a lot of countries (Canada for an example) seem to have laws stating that online your personal information cannot be given out without your permission. This is where Blizzard has a flaw, they're forums, in order to use the forums you need to use your Real full name. But you have the option to not use your name by not posting on the forums so the way I see it this is completely legal. But I'm not a lawyer so don't take my word for it.

The issue I have is this, imagine you're applying for a somewhat decent job, finally moving up from that Call Center cubicle. Now lets also imagine that you happen to play World of Warcraft, now for most intelligent people this isn't an issue. But let's now assume that the person reading your application has two kids, both of his kids are extremely addicted to World of Warcraft and he's mad at the game.

Guess who's getting the job when he looks up your name and he see's World of Warcraft. That's right it'll be Ted down the street, you know the person who as a child stuck crayons up his nose and ate sand because it "Tasted Good".

PS: I actually really don't care about the Blizzard forums, being a World of Warcraft subscriber for the last two months (I know, I'm a newbie) I have never felt the urge to post on Blizzards Forums mostly because they're just a Troll Infested Un-Moderated Sh**Hole or so I've heard.
[DE]FreD_S 8th July 2010, 15:39 Quote
The Problem at hand is not your real name showing up in forums. THAT you can bypass by not using the forums. The problem is within the game. It is ALREADY possible for interface addons to read out the realid data. It is also possible for addons to save data to your hd and pass data on to other computers -> snychronizing. Think about the possibilities people with maliciuos intent now have.

Apart from that, here in Germany it is common for HR to google an aplicants name. WoW is often considred a game with addiction potential. Count 1+1 together...
[DE]FreD_S 8th July 2010, 15:49 Quote
/run for i=1,100 do print(i,BNIsSelf(i)) end

OR

/run for i=1,100 do print(i) if BNIsSelf(i) then print("true") else print("false") end end

typ ingame and try it. Turing all Bnet functions off in the parental control tab in your account control prevents this.
NuTech 8th July 2010, 16:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infection
1) Forums are completely optional
2) For some people they do pay for the service of being able to post. The ability to post on them and be a member rather then a lurker is only given to a member when they have paid for a World of Warcraft subscription, let's face it the WoW players are the ones that are actually causing this nonsense. 1378 pages in a few hours with about 95% of responses being negative?. (I believe you need to have a Valid CDKey on the other games Blizzard operates to post on those particular forums as well. The exception is Starcraft 2, I haven't posted there so I assume either it's unlocked to everyone or it requires a CDKey from another game to be activated on your Battle.net account).

If you read up a lot of countries (Canada for an example) seem to have laws stating that online your personal information cannot be given out without your permission. This is where Blizzard has a flaw, they're forums, in order to use the forums you need to use your Real full name. But you have the option to not use your name by not posting on the forums so the way I see it this is completely legal. But I'm not a lawyer so don't take my word for it.
I'm not sure if you're agreeing or disagreeing with me.

As Blizzard have said many times, your WoW subscription does not have anything to do with the forums, and they're provided as an additional service at their own discretion. They could delete the forums tomorrow if they wanted to. Many people may cancel their subscription, which would be their decision to make.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infection
The issue I have is this, imagine you're applying for a somewhat decent job, finally moving up from that Call Center cubicle. Now lets also imagine that you happen to play World of Warcraft, now for most intelligent people this isn't an issue. But let's now assume that the person reading your application has two kids, both of his kids are extremely addicted to World of Warcraft and he's mad at the game.

Guess who's getting the job when he looks up your name and he see's World of Warcraft. That's right it'll be Ted down the street, you know the person who as a child stuck crayons up his nose and ate sand because it "Tasted Good".
That's a very valid concern with a very simple solution - don't post.

If I played WoW, I wouldn't post in the ReadID forums for the exact same reason. It's not because I'm scared some angry nerd will decide to stalk me, but it's that I don't want WoW posts appearing when a friend, family member or potential employer Google's my name.
wafflesomd 8th July 2010, 17:02 Quote
A lot of the Pro Audio sites I visit have required you to use your real name for a long time. This is nothing new to me.
DriftCarl 8th July 2010, 18:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuTech


As Blizzard have said many times, your WoW subscription does not have anything to do with the forums, and they're provided as an additional service at their own discretion. They could delete the forums tomorrow if they wanted to. Many people may cancel their subscription, which would be their decision to make.

Blizzard also have the right to cancel your subscription at any time they wish for whatever reason they wish, so even your subscription doesn't entitle you to play the game. Their little "forums are not part of the service" disclaimer is simply a legal thing.
Blizzard also owns the game installed on your hard drive, if they wanted to they could create an update that removes it from your hard drive, players have no legal right to anything, that is one of the problems with the games industry right now. Gamers have no rights. And now we have less privacy.
Astrocanis 8th July 2010, 19:11 Quote
The in-game API calls are already available. The forum controversy is simply a blanket thrown over the fire for smoke-screen purposes. Your privacy, IN THE GAME, has already been violated.
Krazeh 8th July 2010, 19:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuTech
I doubt it.

A lot of people seem to think they have a law degree and are jumping all over Blizzard spouting 'facts' regarding EU privacy laws, Data Protection Act, criminal statutes etc etc etc.

Yep, so many armchair lawyers spouting things they have no clue about. Got told on more than one occasion that what I said was wrong even tho I've had several years of working with the DPA at the regulator so know exactly how it works in the real world. Will be very suprised if what Blizzard are proposing are deemed to be in breach of any legislation. Only would be a legal issue if they were to retrospectively apply the change to the forums.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuTech
Two things you have to remember - 1) ActivisionBlizzard have an army of lawyers who are a lot smarter than you or I and whatever decisions they make will be thoroughly vetted before they are made public

Having dealt with numerous lawyers I wouldn't put too much faith in their decisions always being smarter or correct. :) Altho in this case it does appear they have understood data protection properly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuTech
2) Forums are completely optional and you don't have to use them. It's not part of the service you pay for, it's not compulsory and all posts prior to the change will remain anonymous.

Exactly, it's a purely optional extra provided by Blizzard. It's got nothing to do with your subscription fee as much as some people would like to claim. They're under no obligation to provide them at all, or indeed in a form that allows anonymous posting. It's upto them how they want to run them even if their current idea is a horrible one.

[QUOTE=NuTech;2356811]I'm sure before you're allowed to post on any of their new forums, there will be about half a dozen warnings and liability waivers stating what you're about to do will make your full name public.[/quote[

They've already said there's going to be warnings before you're able to post on the new forums making it very clear your real name will be displayed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuTech
Of course, that is if these changes go live in their current state (which I don't think they will do - I suspect Blizzard will allow a one-time unchangeable alias).

I agree that it's unlikely to go live in it's current form, one-time alias seems a good compromise.
leslie 8th July 2010, 19:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken

If i tell a guy in street to go f**k his mother he'll want to hit me if he thinks he's tougher. online, the same comment is just trash talk but the little guys get to backchat the big boys.
Should you have to stick by what you say online?
I'm not concerned at all about any "i'm gonna find out where you live and kick your ass" issues - thats no different from two guys fighting in front of some girl in the chippy at 4am.

How about growing up and realizing it's only the internet, who gives a darn what the idiot said. Yes in RL you may have to watch what you say, maybe you should online as well regardless of consequences.

Basically you are only nice because you have to, what a great way to live.






As for Blizzard, my real name linked to everything else I do online? NO F'ING THANK YOU!.

Why not require a picture as well, you know, just to make sure the stalkers and freaks come out. Trust me, they will. Until you yourself are exposed to the general public in such a way you cannot imagine what all they will do. It wouldn't surprise me if threats have already been made to Micah, and he has probably had people come up to him on the street (both of which can be quite frightening under the best circumstances).
NuTech 8th July 2010, 19:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazeh
Having dealt with numerous lawyers I wouldn't put too much faith in their decisions always being smarter or correct. :) Altho in this case it does appear they have understood data protection properly.
:)

True, but with the sheer amount of litigation they're currently involved in, I'm sure Activision Blizzard have great lawyers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by leslie
It wouldn't surprise me if threats have already been made to Micah, and he has probably had people come up to him on the street (both of which can be quite frightening under the best circumstances).
I'm more concerned about the unlucky people who have his old phone number that was posted online. I cannot imagine the amount of harassment they received, probably had to disconnect their line by now. Poor guys probably didn't even have a clue what a 'Blizzard' was and thought lots of kids were angry at them because of the weather. :D
sheninat0r 8th July 2010, 19:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wafflesomd
A lot of the Pro Audio sites I visit have required you to use your real name for a long time. This is nothing new to me.

Yes, because WoW forums are at the same level of maturity as pro audio sites. Those pro audio kiddies like to flame your ass to next year when you post something they don't like, right? Oh wait - pro audio enthusiasts have this thing called "maturity" which is unfortunately missing from 80% of Blizzard's player base.
Altron 8th July 2010, 20:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheninat0r
Yes, because WoW forums are at the same level of maturity as pro audio sites. Those pro audio kiddies like to flame your ass to next year when you post something they don't like, right? Oh wait - pro audio enthusiasts have this thing called "maturity" which is unfortunately missing from 80% of Blizzard's player base.

Agreed. I am a member at a big audio enthusiast forum, and I have members phone numbers, I've visited several members' houses and apartments, had people over my house, carpooled with people, gone out to dinner with people. I use my real name as an alias, and I've posted my phone number and address, and never had an issue.

That's because most of them are age 25-50, many have families, they have enough money to afford to spend $$$ on the gear, and are in general an intelligent and friendly group of people. Sure, there are arguments (Don't EVER ask if high-priced cables make a difference), but the maturity level is so much higher. People will disagree, but they will make solid points, will not resort to personal attacks, and will not hold grudges or take the argument outside of the topic it is occurring in.

The average age of the Warcraft 3 player (not sure about WoW, probably similar) is around 17. Much more likely to cause trouble.

And, again, this is not some e-peen "Well I'm not afraid if some punks want to come fight me IRL, I can take them" bullshit. That is a tiny chance. What more of us are concerned about, more so than the ability for friends or employers to read forum posts by us, is the loss of privacy and the ability of /b/tards and the other teenage trash that are addicted to Wow to take any possible forum grudges to other avenues of communication that may disrupt our personal lives. At this point, the biggest form of harassment possible would be trash talking in a forum and maybe some mean Private Messages, which could be resolved by a Moderator. If they have access to e-mail addresses, mail addresses, phone numbers, etc. there is a much stronger potential for trouble, either by direct harassment messages or by sending slanderous messages to friends, family, and colleagues, with the only recourse of getting a Restraining Order.
Blademrk 8th July 2010, 20:17 Quote
sure looks like Blizzard are listening
Quote:
Originally Posted by CustomPCMax on Twitter


Wow.... I was just permanently banned from the #WoW forums for trying to discuss the problems of #RealID
and here's his Blog post

edit: also just found this rumour that Blizzard employees have not got any say in the implementation of RealID:

http://www.masterofwarcraft.net/2010/07/rumor-blizzard-had-no-say-in-real-id.html
greigaitken 8th July 2010, 20:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leslie

Basically you are only nice because you have to, what a great way to live.
As for Blizzard, my real name linked to everything else I do online? NO F'ING THANK YOU!.
Why not require a picture as well, you know, just to make sure the stalkers and freaks come out. Trust me, they will. Until you yourself are exposed to the general public in such a way you cannot imagine what all they will do..

thats a bit irrational...
I'm exposed to the public all the time and i not scared of them....i get along with them.
If you feel like you want to be cocooned away from the public, you're doing it wrong.
Walking through town in the daytime is more dangerous than posting your name online - even if your nice in real life and a **** online.
Asphix 8th July 2010, 21:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altron


And, again, this is not some e-peen "Well I'm not afraid if some punks want to come fight me IRL, I can take them" bullshit. That is a tiny chance. What more of us are concerned about, more so than the ability for friends or employers to read forum posts by us, is the loss of privacy and the ability of /b/tards and the other teenage trash that are addicted to Wow to take any possible forum grudges to other avenues of communication that may disrupt our personal lives. At this point, the biggest form of harassment possible would be trash talking in a forum and maybe some mean Private Messages, which could be resolved by a Moderator. If they have access to e-mail addresses, mail addresses, phone numbers, etc. there is a much stronger potential for trouble, either by direct harassment messages or by sending slanderous messages to friends, family, and colleagues, with the only recourse of getting a Restraining Order.

I agree, except if they were to do this I would expect they'd experience real-life consequences involving law enforcement and the like... which I think is the whole point. People have disagreements all the time but harassment on the level the nay-sayers are suggesting doesn't happen. Obviously these immature people exist and they realize what they can easily get away with without repercussions.

RealID is supposed to bring this element onto the forums. Whether it works or not.... that's left to be found out.

Personally, I think the system works fine as-is. Only thing better is the one time user-id creation bound to your serial number. If you behave horribly and get banned.. you have to spend $60 on another copy of the game.
Sloth 8th July 2010, 21:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
thats a bit irrational...
I'm exposed to the public all the time and i not scared of them....i get along with them.
If you feel like you want to be cocooned away from the public, you're doing it wrong.
Walking through town in the daytime is more dangerous than posting your name online - even if your nice in real life and a **** online.
In real life a person quite literally has to expose themselves to the public. It's an unavoidable part of being a corporeal being. Why do so online when you don't have to? If a person has no reason why they should give out their name unwillingly, then any reason why they shouldn't is enough. Leslie has stated a reason not to: the risk of people potentially harrassing each other.
leslie 8th July 2010, 22:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
thats a bit irrational...
I'm exposed to the public all the time and i not scared of them....i get along with them.
If you feel like you want to be cocooned away from the public, you're doing it wrong.
Walking through town in the daytime is more dangerous than posting your name online - even if your nice in real life and a **** online.

I guess no one remembers Selena and John Lennon, both of which were killed by fans. Many others had close calls.

I have had threats, people show up at my door, and more. Not all had bad intentions, but fans are a weird bunch. They can turn on you for stupid reasons. I'm not cocooning myself away, but I'm also not going to be stupid about it. More and more employers are watching what people do online, in terms of hiring and firing. I don't think many realize the long term implications of this sort of thing.


As for walking through town, it depends on where. I can take you to streets where I know you won't come out the other side, but for the most part, you are rather safe in most places.
Psytek 8th July 2010, 23:17 Quote
Trying to force people on the internet to do something is like trying to tell the wind which way to blow.
Krazeh 8th July 2010, 23:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astrocanis
The in-game API calls are already available. The forum controversy is simply a blanket thrown over the fire for smoke-screen purposes. Your privacy, IN THE GAME, has already been violated.

All the ingame API can do is access Real IDs you already have in your friends list, you can't access Real IDs from other people.
Faulk_Wulf 9th July 2010, 00:03 Quote
@ the "Don't post" crowd:

That is a **** solution and it should stop being spouted.
I'm sorry but that's just a lazy poor attitude with no real thought process involved.
What if Bit-Tech instituted the same policy?
"Just post intelligently, or don't post at all..." is that fair? Bullshit.

I'm all for accountability. The last post I made on this topic in a different article
I said tie everyone to a common handle for their account that isn't their log-on name:
Alt123@Faulken Alt999@Faulken, etc etc etc.
There's your accountability right there.

"But Facebook already does this."
1) They give privacy options.
2) NO ONE FREAKING SAID FACEBOOK IS DOING THE RIGHT THING.

I'm sorry if this seems pissier then my norm,
but the fact that anyone is defending this crock of crap...
It makes me sick, almost literally.
CustomPCMAX 9th July 2010, 01:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wafflesomd
A lot of the Pro Audio sites I visit have required you to use your real name for a long time. This is nothing new to me.

Pro Audio sites are NOT polluted with the same immaturity that the WoW forums have. If you have ever spent time in the WoW forums, you would learn that some of the lowliest of the low on the web "troll" around there.

And this is where the problem lies. I have no trust in the whole of the WoW community to not use my name in a bad way. Pro Audio forums are pretty much visited by professionals in the field, which brings a lot more trust to the board.
murraynt 9th July 2010, 02:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheninat0r
Yes, because WoW forums are at the same level of maturity as pro audio sites. Those pro audio kiddies like to flame your ass to next year when you post something they don't like, right? Oh wait - pro audio enthusiasts have this thing called "maturity" which is unfortunately missing from 80% of Blizzard's player base.

Its missing for 80 percent of gamers altogether.I dont know why people have to be assholes when they game online.
This is for all ages.
But i must say that the bit-tech fourms are a nice place with a alot of honest people
Fizzban 9th July 2010, 06:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blademrk
sure looks like Blizzard are listening

and here's his Blog post

edit: also just found this rumour that Blizzard employees have not got any say in the implementation of RealID:

http://www.masterofwarcraft.net/2010/07/rumor-blizzard-had-no-say-in-real-id.html

If you go a read the link he quoted you will see why he was banned. It wasn't anything he himself wrote. It was because he linked to some ones blog who had personally identifying material about other people on it. I understand he was trying to make a point, but I'm not surprised he was banned. If he had left the blog link out he would have been fine.

-

Still, if Blizzard/Activision can't see why this is such a terrible idea then they deserve the drop in sales and the lawsuits that will follow.
Krazeh 9th July 2010, 12:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzban
Still, if Blizzard/Activision can't see why this is such a terrible idea then they deserve the drop in sales and the lawsuits that will follow.

Lawsuits? For what exactly?
Fizzban 9th July 2010, 12:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazeh
Lawsuits? For what exactly?

Well perhaps there wont be any against them directly as I'm sure they will cover their backsides in the agreement you have to ok to to use their forum. But I can easily see people being negatively affected because blizzard/activison are sharing peoples personal information with the whole world. You telling me if some WoW troll goes and maims/kills/stalks another WoW troll because they share peoples real names, that there won't be a some kind of a reaction?
Krazeh 9th July 2010, 12:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzban
Well perhaps there wont be any against them directly as I'm sure they will cover their backsides in the agreement you have to ok to to use their forum. But I can easily see people being negatively affected because blizzard/activison are sharing peoples personal information with the whole world. You telling me if some WoW troll goes and maims/kills/stalks another WoW troll because they share peoples real names, that there won't be a some kind of a reaction?

No i'm not saying that, but I fail to see how anyone would successfully be able to sue Blizzard for anything that might happen after they consent to having their real name disclosed on a public forum.
Altron 9th July 2010, 13:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazeh
No i'm not saying that, but I fail to see how anyone would successfully be able to sue Blizzard for anything that might happen after they consent to having their real name disclosed on a public forum.

They wouldn't sue Blizzard... the idiot anti-video-game lobbyists would just use it as more ammunition in their misguided crusade against any and all types of gaming. Blizzard would probably voluntarily ditch the RealID like a prom-night dumpster baby if something like that happened due to bad publicity, but they're not breaking any laws by implementing it.
NuTech 9th July 2010, 15:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faulk_Wulf
I'm sorry if this seems pissier then my norm,
but the fact that anyone is defending this crock of crap...
It makes me sick, almost literally.
If restricted access to a video game forum is enough to nearly make you sick, then I think you need to re-evaluate your priorities. Maybe cut back on the WoW some?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altron
They wouldn't sue Blizzard... the idiot anti-video-game lobbyists would just use it as more ammunition in their misguided crusade against any and all types of gaming.
While most people are spouting rubbish about litigation and suing Blizzard, you actually make a good point.

If an incident was to happen and there was even the slightest link to the RealID forums, the fallout Activision Blizzard could receive would be insane. The media loves the type of sensational a story like that would provide.

In the eyes of the law they may have done nothing wrong, but since when has that stopped grandstanders taking the opportunity of some free self-promotion?
b5k 9th July 2010, 16:59 Quote
For those implying that Blizzards forums are *optional*....They're optional in the sense that with out the forums then the developers would not be able to gain feedback from players at all. I look at it like this. The people posting in class forums about game balance and stuff are already a minority (i used to be one). It's a small subset of people who give a damn about how the game is balanced and put forward arguments to the developers as to why changes should happen.

Now take that already minority and slash it even more, cause now you've excluded everyone who doesn't want to be known by their real name. That means less feedback, which means a smaller sample of feedback, which could mean less accurate changes to the way the game works and functions...which directly effects those who pay to play the game.

Guilds post on the forums to get members, cause lets face it...Spamming guild ads in game is retarded and ineffective. Plus, how will anyone find your http://myguild.com if you don't have a thread on your Realm forums?!

It would mean that the only tech support routes available to clients would be Phone and Email. Having had to deal with various issues with Blizzard from false bans to hacked accounts to payment issues I can say that their Phone and Email system are less effective than the forums. In fact several times I've been told by email/phone to go read the forums.

So lets make it clear. You pay to play WoW, the forums are used for the WoW community to provide feedback to developers. For them to say "THIS IS A COMMUNITY GAME" then basically exclude and make it uncomfortable for large sums of the community to post is just backwards on so many levels.

Long story short, it's a COMMUNITY game and excluding the COMMUNITY from it under the pretext of Social Networking is retarded. The community is already socially networked. There are huge guilds that span servers, etc, etc. To suggest that making it like a facebook game will make it better? Eh...I think they miss the point.
Krazeh 9th July 2010, 17:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by b5k
For those implying that Blizzards forums are *optional*....They're optional in the sense that with out the forums then the developers would not be able to gain feedback from players at all. I look at it like this. The people posting in class forums about game balance and stuff are already a minority (i used to be one). It's a small subset of people who give a damn about how the game is balanced and put forward arguments to the developers as to why changes should happen.

Now take that already minority and slash it even more, cause now you've excluded everyone who doesn't want to be known by their real name. That means less feedback, which means a smaller sample of feedback, which could mean less accurate changes to the way the game works and functions...which directly effects those who pay to play the game.

There are other ways for developers to get feedback without using forums. As it is Blizzard are under no obligation to provide forums and could get rid of them tomorrow if they wanted to. They are provided as an additional extra to your WoW subscription and you're allowed to post on them if you agree to follow Blizzard's rules. It's that simple, you don't like the rules you don't post.
Quote:
Originally Posted by b5k
Guilds post on the forums to get members, cause lets face it...Spamming guild ads in game is retarded and ineffective. Plus, how will anyone find your http://myguild.com if you don't have a thread on your Realm forums?!

Fairly certain nearly every, if not all, members in my guild were recruited by "spamming" guild ads in game. It's perfectly effective as a recruitment method. Not to mention there are plenty of other WoW communities that specialise in or offer guilds the place to advertise and recruit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by b5k
It would mean that the only tech support routes available to clients would be Phone and Email. Having had to deal with various issues with Blizzard from false bans to hacked accounts to payment issues I can say that their Phone and Email system are less effective than the forums. In fact several times I've been told by email/phone to go read the forums.

So they make the phone and email system better. Solves that problem. I also believe a statement has been made to the effect that they plan to run the technical support forums slightly differently to allow people to not have to use their Real ID to post.
Krazeh 9th July 2010, 18:08 Quote
Well as some of us correctly predicted Blizzard have altered their plans and appear to be moving to using a pseudonym based on your character name and account code/name. Seems a sensible compromise imo.
Sloth 9th July 2010, 19:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuTech
If restricted access to a video game forum is enough to nearly make you sick, then I think you need to re-evaluate your priorities. Maybe cut back on the WoW some?
Why should the restriction be requiring one's private and personal information? There are these magical things called usernames and passwords, avatars and pseudonyms. Blizzard knows these quite well: WoW players already have an account name and various character names. Why not a RealID name which can be anything a person wants? It has absolutely nothing to do with him complaining about WoW forums having a restriction, only the type of restriction.

Or were you purposefully not understanding his post in the slightest just to try and make a quick dig about playing WoW?
Krayzie_B.o.n.e. 9th July 2010, 21:31 Quote
With the current unstoppable rise of Identity Theft across the internet these morons (Blizzard) want players to use their real names while online? Just brilliant and I'm moving to Russia so I can take advantage of this situation and make my self a millionaire.

If someone's Identity is stolen by way of RealID then Blizzard should be held liable. Username, Avatars, and passwords are more than enough info needed to play a game online, what's next WoW characters run around the screen with the Social Security number of the player above it's head and credit card numbers on their backs.

WoW 11 million players today 11 players tomorrow Feel free to come over to Star Wars: The Old Republic upon it's release.
NuTech 9th July 2010, 21:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth
Why should the restriction be requiring one's private and personal information? There are these magical things called usernames and passwords, avatars and pseudonyms. Blizzard knows these quite well: WoW players already have an account name and various character names. Why not a RealID name which can be anything a person wants? It has absolutely nothing to do with him complaining about WoW forums having a restriction, only the type of restriction.

Or were you purposefully not understanding his post in the slightest just to try and make a quick dig about playing WoW?
Read my post(s), they never agreed with the (now cancelled) RealID forum change because it could potentially do more harm than good (although I was curious to see how they would actually work) - but I do understand why Blizzard would want to something like that.

I used to play WoW myself, and my "dig" at Faulk_Wulf was because his response and words chosen is the typical comical, hyperbolic and immature overreaction that only goes to reinforce the stereotype that WoW players are crazy children.
south side sammy 10th July 2010, 22:55 Quote
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