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OnLive works on iPhones too

OnLive works on iPhones too

OnLive is a cloud computing system for gaming while will apparently even run on mobile phones.

OnLive, the cloud computing system for gaming which should allow users to play games regardless of their hardware thanks to some clever new compression techniques, will apparently work on mobile phones too.

That's according to OnLive CEO Steve Perlman, who reportedly demonstrated the system at a Wedbush Morgan financial conference and had OnLive running on multiple systems at once - including iPhones.

"Today, at a Wedbush financial conference in New York I showed OnLive running simultaneously on two iPhones, a TV, and a computer," claimed Perlman according to Joystiq.

OnLive is still a controversial idea in the games industry, with numerous sceptics claiming that the system is not feasible over current internet connections nor financially feasible. OnLive has been demonstrated before the press, however there's been some issues regarding how comparable the demonstrations will be to a final user experience.

"It's important to understand that a cell phone is a very different beast than TV, PC or Mac ... currently, games on OnLive are tuned for TVs and computers, so initially, it's the Community and Social elements of OnLive that we're most excited about on mobile devices," said Perlman.

Let us know your thoughts in the forums.

19 Comments

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[PUNK] crompers 16th November 2009, 13:32 Quote
do we have a proposed release date for this? or even proof of it working outside a controlled environment?
Flibblebot 16th November 2009, 13:32 Quote
I'm still sceptical until I've seen (or seen reported) a live, real-world demonstration - not a demo in a closed, controlled environment.
scawp 16th November 2009, 13:43 Quote
real-world demonstration? Sign up for the public beta. http://www.onlive.com/beta_program.html

You do however need to live in the US.
Centy-face 16th November 2009, 14:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by scawp
real-world demonstration? Sign up for the public beta. http://www.onlive.com/beta_program.html

You do however need to live in the US.

Which in itself is worrying how will streaming likely from america work for the rest of the world.
Psytek 16th November 2009, 14:24 Quote
If I become an onlive member, do they pay for me to have a 100mbit internet connection? My current 10down/05up connection is barely enough for the miniscule amount of data transfer required for locally run games played online.
wuyanxu 16th November 2009, 14:37 Quote
imagine a 3GS on the train (with good 3G signal assuming) with a iPhone stand and a bluetooth controller....... playing Crysis!
Cupboard 16th November 2009, 14:50 Quote
You would then need to:
a) bring a bluetooth keyboard and mouse and b) your power adapter
so you may as well just use your laptop.
And considering O2's "unlimited" data plan is anything but, you would motor your way through that pretty quickly too.
AshT 16th November 2009, 16:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuyanxu
imagine a 3GS on the train (with good 3G signal assuming) with a iPhone stand and a bluetooth controller....... playing Crysis!

And a magnifying glass to pick out the enemies in the trees! ;)
alexicore5000 16th November 2009, 16:14 Quote
its an interesting idea, but i think its more of a marketing exercise in "we can do it, so we will" ...a bit of hype for home usage.
due to the limitations of the screen size and 3g i cant see it being that feasible
NuTech 16th November 2009, 17:30 Quote
Do the makers of OnLive have anything to do with the Phantom console? :|

From the last E3, a lot of bloggers said that the hands-on demonstration was (just about) functional but also commented that the image was noticeably compressed. Remember that this was also under ideal conditions with the servers being located "about a block away" said the OnLive reps, but you will only need to be "within 1000 miles of the servers" when launched.

Apparently all the hardware was hidden and all the public could see was Xbox360 controllers sticking out of a box, so for all we know the 'server' could of been a few feet away.

My biggest problem with all this, is that the streaming technology they claim to have invented just for OnLive sounds revolutionary. If it actually exists, surely the first thing they'd do is approach all the multimedia heavyweights (Microsoft, NewsCorp, DirectTV, Apple etc) and licence it out for various usages?
mrplow 16th November 2009, 17:43 Quote
As NuTech said, if they have really done this it's amazing. Does anyone know of a way to do this type of thing on a relatively high speed LAN - if they really can move this kind of data over IP over a huge distance then 20 feet through a 100mpbs wire should be a piece of cake?
No VNC type app seems to be even close to fast enough, or perhaps just not designed right... it'd be awesome to sit on my low powered laptop playing a game from my high(ish) powerered desktop!
NuTech 16th November 2009, 17:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrplow
No VNC type app seems to be even close to fast enough, or perhaps just not designed right... it'd be awesome to sit on my low powered laptop playing a game from my high(ish) powerered desktop!
Could you imagine the surge in Netbook sales?

Yet another revenue stream OnLive could have exploited...
Star*Dagger 16th November 2009, 18:32 Quote
OnLive will revolutionize gaming as we know it, this is the biggest story in gaming since graphics cards were introduced.
DarkLord7854 16th November 2009, 19:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Article
OnLive is a cloud computing system for gaming while will apparently even run on mobile phones.

Teehee.. :p


I'm not sold on OnLive.. especially with how ISPs are getting greedy with bandwidth, I can see this going south real fast.
knuck 17th November 2009, 05:40 Quote
20mins of gaming will bust my monthly bandwidth limit ...

I'm extremely skeptical about this technology but... if it works I can't really see it being bad for the consumer
Bauul 17th November 2009, 09:34 Quote
It's not so much the amount of data that's the problem: you can stream HD over the internet without trouble these days (BBC HD iPlayer ftw!) The problem is the lag: no matter how huge your connection, there's going to be a delay between you pressing a button, the signal traveling 1,000 miles to the sever, the server calculating the result, rendering it, compressing it and sending it back.

Hell, people complain over the tiniest bit of mouse lag or monitor delay. For an RTS, it might work, but anything remotely twitch gaming I just can't see working.

I work with remotely rendered programs all the time (Citrix, hosted in Germany) and despite being a billion euro company with the IT infrastructure to boot, the delay is very noticeable.
Whalemeister 17th November 2009, 14:44 Quote
I can't believe how many people on here are stuck with monthly download limits... OK granted that most 'unlimited' packages are subject to a fair usage policy but ffs poeple, DL limits are about as draconian as dial-up!
NuTech 17th November 2009, 16:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whalemeister
I can't believe how many people on here are stuck with monthly download limits... OK granted that most 'unlimited' packages are subject to a fair usage policy but ffs poeple, DL limits are about as draconian as dial-up!
Indeed. As somebody who has never had a download cap (went from BT ADSL, to BeThere ADSL2 and finally Virgin 50Mb), the idea of one depresses me.

I think the problem is way worse in the USA where some people have little or no choice about their providers. On the whole their connections may be faster than ours, but from what I understand, broadband can be expensive and prohibitive over the pond.
knuck 17th November 2009, 16:18 Quote
that's the way it is in canada ...
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