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Crytek no longer PC exclusive

Crytek no longer PC exclusive

CryTek claims it has no choice but to make console games too if it wants to survive.

Crytek, while it maybe never had anything properly announced or set in stone, was possibly the last of the big-time developers to focus only on PC. Even Epic, id Software and Bethesda are multiplatform at best when it comes to game releases.

Crytek has now confirmed though that it will no longer be a PC exclusive developer because of industry pressures resulting from piracy.

"We are suffering currently from the huge piracy that is encompassing Crysis. We seem to lead the charts in piracy by a large margin. I believe that’s the core problem of PC gaming: PC gamers that pirate games inherently destroy the platform," Crytek president Cevat Yerli told PC Play.

"Similar games on consoles sell factors of 4-5 more. It was a big lesson for us and I believe we won’t have PC exclusives as we did with Crysis in future. We are going to support PC, but not exclusive any more.

Piracy was also cited as one of the main reasons for the closure of Titan Quest developer Iron Lore Studios and is a major concern for developers and publishers at the moment.

RockPaperShotgun recently investigated the rampancy of pirated games and found that from a single site in a single day more than 25,000 copies of Assassin's Creed PC had been downloaded illegally - and that's before the game was even released!

With numbers like those, it's no wonder that developers are now moving ever more towards the console market. Can anything be done to save PC games, or is it too late? Let us know in the forums.

54 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
liratheal 30th April 2008, 10:10 Quote
Did no one tell them that it could well be their own fault for hiring a rock to write the story for the game?

I'm not sure many people want to pay for something to beat the hell out of their machine while they experience what can only be described as every shooter for the last decade rolled together, badly..
sotu1 30th April 2008, 10:21 Quote
all of a sudden, the anti piracy gear behind bioshock seems almost reasonable. we've suffered big time because of piracy.

or

look at it the other way and crysis are just money hungry greedy pigs
steveo_mcg 30th April 2008, 10:28 Quote
Did bioshock honestly see less piracy? I didn't pirate it but then i didn't buy it either, same goes for crysis.

Hands up who sick of hearing the piracy scape goat for mediocre games....
oasked 30th April 2008, 10:31 Quote
I bought Crysis, I thoroughly enjoyed playing it. I'm suprised that they haven't made it available on Steam yet - but then the publisher is EA, so what do you expect.
steveo_mcg 30th April 2008, 10:33 Quote
How much piracy has TF2 seen or HL2? I'm curious since i've never gone looking and i'm at work so most of "that" kind of information gets blocked.
Garside 30th April 2008, 10:35 Quote
Maybe part of the problem is the expense of PC hardware. You spend so much money on all the components to be able to play games like Crysis that the user feels as though they shouldn't have to pay for the actual games. I for one know of people who spend so much money on their PC primarily because of the ease of piracy. It's a trade off of sorts.
Burnout21 30th April 2008, 10:45 Quote
i dont think its the UK market that is causing massive amounts of piracy...

If you want to play a game buy it, if you dont like it trade it in. If you have got the money to run a high end machine then you have got the money to buy the games.

In the past i use to buy a game and then copy it so i could have multiplayer on my home network, but that was it, i classified it as 'backup copies', i still think you can backup up a DVD or app if it remains in your ownership, if you have a few 1000 copies then i would see it as a little dodgy...
Cthippo 30th April 2008, 10:53 Quote
Piracy is just an excuse. The real motivating factor for consolization is market size. There are fundamentally three platforms out there for high end games (PC PS3 and 360) and why would you limit yourself to one when you can sell to all 3? A crappy game selling on three platforms is going to make more money than a great game selling on one.
reflux 30th April 2008, 10:59 Quote
Developers have got to make a convincing case for buying games. If people can get something for free why should they pay for it? In my opinion, the best way of doing this is selling your game on Steam. I've bought several games from there because it can be really cheap and it's really convenient. I'm sure that if every A-list title was on Steam, we wouldn't experience the piracy problems that we do.
HitmanAdski 30th April 2008, 11:05 Quote
I hope and wish that the PC Alliance brings out a nice interface program that enhances the PC Gaming experience. It should be more like live perhaps even linking up with live seen as both platforms are Microsoft owned... but then again I'm dreaming.

On the Piracy matter, It's hurting alot of companies... the PC gaming community is more and more becoming a PC pirate bay. There is no good reason for you to steal (and believe it or not it is stealing money) from these companies, yes they are in there for money.... THEY ARE COMPANIES!!!

Anyway I find it Uber n00by for people to download games because they don't have enough motivation to ether go to your local gaming store or bloody pick up a credit card and punch the numbers in folks How hard is that?
Kúsař 30th April 2008, 11:13 Quote
Why they never ask people why they didn't buy their game? Perhaps gamers with slow PC's don't want to spend 100$ for a game which will look like 98's game on their machine(and play even worse). Perhaps some gamers don't like invasive copy protection(my case). Perhaps they should try offering better prices...

I would buy Crysis if there were no internet activation stupidity(same for Bioshock) and if it were slightly cheaper.

Just saying "we're leaving PC's" isn't going to solve anything. If they leave PC's, pirates will leave too...
Baz 30th April 2008, 11:19 Quote
It's name is steam. It stops zero day piracy. it is great. Release your games through it and rejoice!
Panos 30th April 2008, 11:23 Quote
The same company wasn't last year who was saying that Crysis will be Vista exclusive ONLY? Forcing people to buy the expensive 8800GTS640 and 8800GTX looking into the future for a fantastic game?
What happened is that they deliver a small game who none is going to buy ( at least in UK) for £40 ($80).
I didn't got it and I had the machine (which I sold to a friend) that period.

On the other side there are PC games that worth more fun and value than Crysis (and cheaper!!!).
Examples? Civilization 4 (including all the expansion packs) is a huge game. A game is never same than another one. It's plays perfectly on my low budget X2 6400+ (780G motherboard) machine, on the 1080p 50" plasma tv with full gfx. It play even on my laptop (Sempron 3000, X1100 gfx) when traveling. Also Oblivion, X3, are few of the games around there where you can carry on after years playing. And this September we have Spore. That will be a good value for money and fun game which I will buy twice because my wife want to play it too.

In the mean time MS force me to learn their Robotics Studio to program AI for their robotic challenges. :D
Sleepstreamer 30th April 2008, 11:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baz
It's name is steam. It stops zero day piracy. it is great. Release your games through it and rejoice!

WORD
TTmodder 30th April 2008, 11:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baz
It's name is steam. It stops zero day piracy. it is great. Release your games through it and rejoice!

The (sad) truth :(
Baz 30th April 2008, 11:34 Quote
I think games like Sins of a solar empire are increasingly becoming the way to go, and the sales of that game have been excellent. No copy protection, but access to patches is login (cdkey) based. The graphics are scabale from very very basic all the way up to face slackeningly beautiful, and the gameplay is immersive, addictive and endlessly replayable.

Crysis invited this on itself, with system requirements so high people were unwilling to buy the game for fear it wouldn't work, and a single player narative with absolutly no replay value.
Tyrmot 30th April 2008, 11:44 Quote
They may lose some sales due to piracy, but as ever, one has to ask many of those 25,000 people would have actually gone to drop £30 on Assassin's Creed if they couldn't have got it for free from the internet, I'm thinking it wouldn't have been that many. It's likely as well that a lot of those people play for a couple of hours or so, decide they don't like it, and move on - effectively using it as a demo when one isn't provided.

Personally, I think invasive anti-piracy measures may hurt sales more than piracy itself. I for one (and I'm surely not alone here) didn't, and will never, buy BioShock (even though I would actually like to - and indeed almost did before reading up on it) because of the ludicrously draconian anti-piracy they packaged with that.

Developers/Publishers should take a leaf out of Stardock's book, who ship their games with no piracy protection whatsoever - as they point out 'People who never buy software aren't lost sales' - if you make a good game, then it will sell lots, it's as simple as that.

ps - neither do I think Steam is the answer here, they are still putting restrictions on a product you have bought off them! i.e. your own property! I like having my games available on disc/offline as well and if I am shelling out my hard-earned for a game then I should be able to have a hard-copy of it if I so choose. Again - Stardock allow you to pay for the download, or for a slight fee get a disc sent out out too (minus copy protection). Three cheers for Stardock! If only all developers were like them...
Bladestorm 30th April 2008, 11:50 Quote
Lets see.

I've not bought crysis. I've not pirated crysis either because I don't do that anymore (It's nice being legit, you should all try it :D) . Back when I was downloading games for a bit, It probably would have been one I would have because:

It probably wouldn't have run at all well.
I'd heard bad things about the story.
I'd heard multiplayer was probably the bigger focus (not my thing..)
I had some desire to "see" it, but little desire to really "want" it if that makes sense.

It just sounded/sounds like a shallow game trying to be "cool" that only stood out because of a graphics engine with the potential to be really pretty, but really problematic for most people at the same time. In that respect I agree with stardock's take on the matter - a lot of developer's work really hard at being the coolest, with the shiniest graphics and in so doing almost completely miss the market segment that actually buys games because they don't offer what they want (EG high quality gameplay that's going to last that can be run on a wide variety of machines)
Mentai 30th April 2008, 12:23 Quote
One thing about steam and HL2/TF2 is that I know I will enjoy any game from valve, they have never let me down. Why would I want to pirate one of their games? Especially with the hassle of getting past steam and wanting to play multiplayer. I think many other gamers feel the same way about certain other companies, but crytek don't quite have that image.

Or do they? I heard that crysis ending up selling quite well, once everyone had managed to get a hold of their 8800GT's. It seems kinda childish to blame piracy for the move to consoles. The console market simply put, is much much bigger. As much as I hate to say it, It doesn't really make much sense for a fps to remain PC exclusive, and I'm suprised they didn't make the move sooner.

As for assasin's creed, they released it with no demo and high system requirements... People "checking" if they could play it probably amounted to a large proportion those downloads.
TomH 30th April 2008, 12:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baz
It's name is steam. It stops zero day piracy. it is great. Release your games through it and rejoice!
Exactly what I wanted to say, too. Comments above regarding the increase of market penetration are spot-on, also - piracy is certainly no more than a common excuse.

"But, Mr. CEO, we can't go multi-platform, we'll upset our PC-wielding geek-base!"
"So.. Just blame them for the change?"
"Oh.. That could work!"
AcidJiles 30th April 2008, 12:29 Quote
As usual companies fail to understand the difference between people downloading the game and people buying it. I dont pirate games its one of the few areas I dont as I feel I get my moneys worth where as other media forms are too expensive for the time that you enjoy it. People who download games often wouldnt buy it in the first place so its not a lost sale as with lots of media that are pirated and claim lost sales. I dont deny there are some lost sales but its not at the levels they suggest.
ChaosDefinesOrder 30th April 2008, 12:29 Quote
Something that I find amazing is that people are blaming piracy for the move from PC to consoles, when they fail to realise that a PC game in the UK costs £20-£30 in stores, while the xbox 360 and PS3 version of the same game is £40-£50

Seems to me that extra 20 quid revenue per game is the driving force! Piracy is just the scapegoat so people don't realise the truth!

As for Crysis piracy, what do they expect when they release a game with such high minimum specs? People are probably downloading it just to see if it will run on their PC before buying it! While the pre-owned sector of console gaming is large, the ease at which you can buy a PC game, install it, crack the .exe, then sell the game on when you don't need the disc any more means a lot of places don't even accept PC game returns let alone pre-own trading! Why would you buy the game and risk it not running, then struggle to sell the disc on if it doesn't run? Just download it to test first instead...
aggies11 30th April 2008, 14:18 Quote
Piracy or no Piracy, console games typically sell more then PC games simply because the console market is larger. Consoles are more accessible and so target a wider more "mainstream" audience. This means there is more money to be made. However "it's due to piracy" is a more palatable excuse for developers then "we want to make more money". But as long as the PC market is still large enough to make developing games profitable, there will be those that develop for it.

To be honest, Crytek's ties to EA made most people believe that console development was in their future anyhow. If Crytek doesn't compromise future development of their PC titles to support the console (eg. Epic and UE3) then nothing changes anyway. Crysis is awesome and more people should play it.
Bladestorm 30th April 2008, 14:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChaosDefinesOrder
Something that I find amazing is that people are blaming piracy for the move from PC to consoles, when they fail to realise that a PC game in the UK costs £20-£30 in stores, while the xbox 360 and PS3 version of the same game is £40-£50

Seems to me that extra 20 quid revenue per game is the driving force! Piracy is just the scapegoat so people don't realise the truth!

A large chunk of the difference in pricing is licensing fees paid direct to Microsoft/Sony for the privelage of launching a game on there system though, which is how Microsoft/Sony make money on the consoles when they sell them at a loss. Nintendo do it as well, though not to the same extent since they make a profit on the original console sale anyhow.

Side-note: This is also one of the reasons "We don't pay for exclusives!" is ridiculous marketing tripe - a console company can lower the licensing fees as every bit as good a financial incentive to a developer and still claim they haven't paid for the exlusive.
Amon 30th April 2008, 14:28 Quote
So what bit torrent client does everyone here use? :D

But, seriously, I don't pirate games, and I don't buy them anymore either (particularly after letdowns such as ProStreet and Rainbow Six). And if Crytek hasn't convinced me to buy their games now on PC, they're not going to convince me to buy them later for a game console either.
eternum 30th April 2008, 14:38 Quote
There is definitely a strong disparity between reported pirate download numbers and actual lost sales. And this is expecially true for games which have system requirements that push the hardware and don't have a demo available. Piracy may be hurting the PC games industry, but it certainly isn't killing it.

I honestly don't see much of the appeal of consoles - not because I don't see their value, I just don't see their value to ME. Console graphics were by and large pretty crappy until the advent of HD tvs, where finally higher resolution graphics could actually be seen and appreciated in the medium. But I would have to commandeer the livingroom tv to play console games, thus preventing my wife from using it, and I sure as hell don't want to shove ANOTHER display device into my computer room. Also, the input devices for consoles are less intuitive to me than a mouse - I like the precision of a mouse and the use of a full keyboard. Surely, these can't be such niche considerations in the whole of the gaming market? Maybe I missed the train or something, but I don't see how PC gaming should be so easy to dismiss.

Maybe in time as more companies go multi-platform, and PC hardware becomes harder to manage and code for (current gen hardware seems to be awfully finicky), I will hang up my mouse cable and install that medium-size hdtv in front of the hallowed gaming chair. But until it becomes a necessity, I will whine incessantly about the heavy console focus of today's gaming market.

Come on game studios! Start innovating to prevent piracy instead of using the same old ham-fisted tactics, or blaming your userbase for your perceived financial losses! Do you honestly think that console games will remain unpirated as the market share grows?
n8dude 30th April 2008, 14:48 Quote
*sigh* why must people pirate? They just don't understand how much it hurts the industry. PC Gaming is so much better than console gaming, and I never want it to die.
E.E.L. Ambiense 30th April 2008, 14:52 Quote
:( ...And another one bites the dust.
p3n 30th April 2008, 14:57 Quote
I often see steam game .iso's when hunting for TV shows - obviously you can no longer play the games online which I think is a pretty big part of the orange box etc
EvilRusk 30th April 2008, 15:05 Quote
Well Crysis had too many bugs (including the last level one where the final boss can't be killed without restarting the level). After that I won't be sorry that they move on to other things. All they have ever made is a couple of games that you can't run properly until about a year or more after they come out when the hardware catches up. If they want to kid themselves their lack of success is due to piracy then that's fine. Their next game would probably be a paint-by-numbers-alien-shooter-where-you-play-a-lone-person-about-to-save-the-world anyway.

The music industry has started to realise that people want inexpensive mp3s without DRM and sales are improving. The PC games industry needs to learn the same. Oh and they also need to learn to make games that aren't just paint-by-numbers-shooters. I got into PC gaming in the late 90s and there were so many different types of games (and choices within genres, and mods of those games), now you just don't see the same variety.
Jordan Wise 30th April 2008, 15:31 Quote
its gunna look shite on a console
Firehed 30th April 2008, 15:37 Quote
Well I can't blame them, but Crysis did have some quite irritating bugs and like all other games isn't priced acceptably.

The development costs are a one-off thing no matter what you charge for the game. The goal with sales after the fact is naturally to recoup those costs and then some. Download-based distribution is way too damn cheap to keep ignoring. I'll once again cite Amazon S3 that allows devs to distribute the game in-house (and thereby retaining almost 100% of the customer's sale price) for $0.50-$1 for a 5GB file, another buck or two for credit card processing, and the rest is profit. I'm sure that charging $20 for that (which I WOULD pay for most games, as compared to $60 which has resulted in me buying about two new games in the last year) which results in $17-18 going to the developers is a LOT more than they would get with the publishers, retail stores, etc. Distributing through Steam probably isn't quite as profitable but would simplify operations tremendously.

Hell, use Bit-torrent. It's not like the ISO files aren't already out there. Then sell serials for five bucks a pop. Next to no distribution costs and only about 41c in transaction fees through Paypal.

The internet has this magical way of eliminating middle men, and thus eliminating added costs. I understand that they want to make their product available to as wide of an audience as possible, but in the case of Crysis I'd estimate that 80%+ of the people who purchased it would have done so online, and dropping the price from the original $50 or $60 down to $15-20 would have resulted in far more than 3x the sales with probably 10x the profits due to the lower distribution costs. Net result? Better. I have no intent to pay $50-60 for a PC game when I end up acting as a beta tester half the time. Make it that much cheaper and you're going to boost sales that much more.

I of course don't have hard numbers, but I'd bet you end up with about three times the sales for each time you drop the price in half. So going from $50 to $6.25 would yeild 27x more sales for an effective $168, more than 3x the revenue. Again, total guesswork and there IS a limit at the low end before it stops being effective, but when all of your costs are upfront and it's almost free to distribute, then the goal is a) to get as many copies as possible out there and b) to get as many people as possible to pay for those copies. The first is happening whether they like it or not thanks to TPB and the like. If they'd wise up a bit, they can make it work in their favor. Let's say there's a reason that my friend is only going to be charging three bucks for an iPhone game he's developing, rather than $10-15.
wuyanxu 30th April 2008, 15:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jordan Wise
its gunna look shite on a console
agree

i blame, as always, the integrated graphics cards and PC world
steveo_mcg 30th April 2008, 15:49 Quote
Honestly i think firehed has cracked it. The problem is EA (and co) pushing developers to release half arsed games to early then you have no choice but to sell your game through them retail. One of only a few games i've bought recently has been Valve work and tbh of all the games i've bought the Valve ones seem to be the least buggy at launch and the best supported post launch, the reason for this imo is they are less tied to a publisher.
Genestarwind 30th April 2008, 16:17 Quote
This is complete crap, they were never going to be a pc exclusive, did we really think that parent companies like EA would say "no thanks guys we don't need any more money"
oasked 30th April 2008, 16:54 Quote
I don't know why so many moan about Crysis's minimum specs, as an excuse for disliking the game so much.
The game runs just fine on the majority of systems, as long as you lower the options to medium or low. People get so worked up when they can't stick all the settings on maximum.

Crysis Official Min Specs:

2.8Ghz P4
1Gb RAM
6800GT or 9800 Pro
DXR_13KE 30th April 2008, 17:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firehed
*snip*

you hit the nail on the head.

i would also like to add: we in the euro zone are paying 80$ for a pc game.... is this logical?

edit: games at 30$ = paradise + me buying more games.
Breach 30th April 2008, 19:06 Quote
Given I would never have paid for a copy of Crysis, what are the losing exactly if I play it? The game looks nice but, it is basically FarCry with aliens, admit it...
Amon 30th April 2008, 21:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by oasked
I don't know why so many moan about Crysis's minimum specs, as an excuse for disliking the game so much.
The game runs just fine on the majority of systems, as long as you lower the options to medium or low. People get so worked up when they can't stick all the settings on maximum.

Crysis Official Min Specs:

2.8Ghz P4
1Gb RAM
6800GT or 9800 Pro
Minimum is fundamentally unplayable. My brother ran it on his 3.0E Prescott and 7800 GS, both overclocked, and managed to produce around 15 frames per second and below at (I believe) 800x600 while playing on the lowest possible detail settings. So, really, the target audience for the game is hardcore gamers with their very expensive, self-proclaimed elite machines.

Chalk one up for the simplicity of game consoles.
MajestiX 30th April 2008, 23:27 Quote
it's the developers killing themselves not the consumer

anyone purchase a dvd to sit through 30 seconds of the it is to make copies of this and you are watching it illegaly and that you're gonna get sued. why buy the dvd when i can double click and skip that BS and the title screen and get straight into the movie.

anyone buy a game that forces you to jump through hoops just to install it (registration) ontop of that making you keep a cd key that probly gets destroyed or lost in a month, makes you insert the cd to play even though you are not allowed to make copies of the cd and even if you did the protection won't let the game accept it as the original cd. Why do this when i can double click and get right into the action instead of shuffling through cd's.

anyone tired of having to go out buy something and have to wait to get home to play it. Anyone want to buy a game online without having to wait for it to be delivered.

let's admit it we're of a society with little time and patients even though we can waste hours and hours in a game or infront of the tv. These copyright acts, regional codes, insert cd, register here, one copy are forcing users to do an extra few step that would be cheaper for the developers if they weren't in place (cd's, copyright) why can't they just sell cd keys for 20 bucks and let the user find their own way of getting the game. if you want a box and pretty pictures mail it to them, how hard is it to give someone an instant cd key?
TheoGeo 30th April 2008, 23:33 Quote
Quick, everybody pirate console games to balance things up...

In all seriousness, yes they might have lost some sales to piracy, but most people didn't buy the game because they believed it would never run on they're machine, They made a game that required a high end pc to run it, then were surprised when every pc gamer out there didn't fork out £30 for something that probably wouldn't work.
Tim S 1st May 2008, 00:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garside
Maybe part of the problem is the expense of PC hardware. You spend so much money on all the components to be able to play games like Crysis that the user feels as though they shouldn't have to pay for the actual games. I for one know of people who spend so much money on their PC primarily because of the ease of piracy. It's a trade off of sorts.

You can build a great PC for £400 that plays Crysis at 720p with relative ease. That's not much more than the cost of a PS3 and you get all the extra functionality associated with a PC.
Matticus 1st May 2008, 01:00 Quote
firehed is exactly right.

I have often moaned about this to at my girlfriend when I have seen something about piracy on the news.

If they only made things cheaper, and available through the net, they would make more sales.

Whichever way you look at it £30-£40 for a game is a lot. Most people* might buy 3 games a year at £30-£40 which is say £90 to £120. I can imagine if the game was available on the net for £10-£20 then people might buy say 10 games a year which is £100 to £150.

I dont know about you guys, but you know when things are cheap you say "yeah its cheap I will just get another, oh and thats only another £10, oh yeah and that" and before you know it you have spent just as much but on several smaller things.

People are fundementally lazy and impatient, if they could buy online and download quickly there and then just like on steam, then they might think otherwise about torrenting the game.

I think most people that pirate a game(s) would not even bother to buy it anyway so its not really lost sales. Many of these people probably do have the money, as they have a fast enough system to play current games on, they are just impatient and lazy, if you could go to EA website and download the game for £15 and at very high speeds, a large percentage of the piraters would go for it.



My final point... Anti Piracy protection does not work why spend so much money working on this protection, when its cracked so easily by so many people. Just save money putting only very basic protection or none, and [broken record player] charge less for the game and let people download it [/broken record player]

*By most people I mean casual gamers, I expect that these people may rent or borrow copies of games also.
Cthippo 1st May 2008, 03:22 Quote
I'm just glad the debate has moved on from "pirates are killing gaming aaaugh panic" to an understanding that the reality is far more complex. Gaming isn't dying, but it is moving towards a lower standard to increase potential market share. Companies are looking at the cost of making a game and asking themselves why make a totally over the top, out of this world game that maybe 50 million people can play, when we can make a good game that 500 million people are able to play?

I think Crysis will be the last of the uber high-end PC exclusive games for all these reasons.
CardJoe 1st May 2008, 08:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bladestorm
A large chunk of the difference in pricing is licensing fees paid direct to Microsoft/Sony for the privelage of launching a game on there system though, which is how Microsoft/Sony make money on the consoles when they sell them at a loss. Nintendo do it as well, though not to the same extent since they make a profit on the original console sale anyhow.

Not true. I've heard that Nintendo charge a lot more than Sony when it comes to handhelds at least. Don't quote me, but the figures I've heard are around 50% for Nintendo DS and 15%-25% for Sony PSP.

Online distribution is definitely the way to go. I disagree with a lot of the flak that EA is getting over this, but in my opinion there are to blame a little. Not for anything to do with going multiplatform, as the developers are essentially autonomous for the most part and EA is one of the few companies still working on making decent PC games and PC ports. In my opinion, where EA is at fault is in pushing the EA Store scheme. It's a good idea, but it just hasn't really taken off as well as it needs to. They've had a good ol' punt at online distribution, but it doesn't seem to be panning out all that well because Steam got there first.

Getting everyone on Steam is a good idea in theory, but consolidating the market under one roof like that could prove disastourous for the developers wholly owned by publishers if things go wrong. Instead, we need more Steam equivalents in the spotlight. Giving Steam some competition would be excellent for the industry and, though admittedly Bit-torrent and Amazon sales might work, there's little incentive for a company of EAs size to go that low-tech when they could stand to compete with Valve.

EA gets a lot of flak, but they are by no means the bad guy everyone makes them out to be. The reality here is that CryTek is to blame for this, not EA. They were the ones that made such a lack-luster game and focused themselves too much at the high end. EA were just the ones who helped them get the budget for it. EA didn't make a bad game out of Crysis and they didn't tell Cevat to say this I bet. What they did do was have a (failed) go at online distribution and keep the PC market alive by selling a couple of billion Sims games.
Bladestorm 1st May 2008, 10:56 Quote
Somehow I'm not surprised that the DS has much higher charges, given the PSP isn't much competition, particularly in japan where both are based (I recall a recent tokyo game show report which said the whole place was stuffed full of people, though you could always go to the PSP area if you wanted to get some quiet time away from them, since it was pretty much empty of show-goers ;p) but I wasn't really thinking of handhelds at all (Truthfully I don't really consider them competition for the PC, nor do I own one or plan to buy one)
donnie 1st May 2008, 17:23 Quote
Personally Crysis was a huge let down and i wish i had saved my money because it was a huge pile of crap with a colourful bow on, no storyline whatsoever to give a damn about which in this day and age is appaling for a developer to do so as far as i'm concerned pirate the hell outta crysis coz crytek shot themself in the foot with that release.
D3s3rt_F0x 1st May 2008, 19:57 Quote
Let me put it this way, Bioshock imo a great game I went out bought after playing the demo and thoroughly enjoyed it....so much so I went through it 4 times.

Crysis wow flashy graphics, but where was the story? Where was anything that was even remotely new? The suit? I used it like twice through the game then asked myself why did I finish it cause I wasted a few hours of my life playing a game that yes had amazing graphics but it was like the most delicious looking apple you ever seen in your life that happens to be rotting inside the core.

They can complain about piracy when they make a decent game.

Still cant believe Bit-tech rated it so high.....in a technical sense cause of the engine yes....but the game itself? Come on chaps bring it together good graphics dosnt make for a good game. Was it really the 4th best game of last year as well?

(No I didnt pirate it I borrowed a friends copy and used that, but if I hadnt I might very well of then stopped playing it after 10 mintues)
DXR_13KE 1st May 2008, 22:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cthippo
I'm just glad the debate has moved on from "pirates are killing gaming aaaugh panic" to an understanding that the reality is far more complex.

you know what? i am very surprised it hasn't....

on a side note, i don't see valve in trouble... and they are (as far as i know) PC exclusive....
Rebourne 2nd May 2008, 06:04 Quote
I bought their game and enjoyed it. However, their target audience was a minority group of a minority group, so all things considered I think they did very well in sales.
Hamish 2nd May 2008, 11:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matticus


Whichever way you look at it £30-£40 for a game is a lot.
its NOT £30-40 for a brand new pc game
i've bought several games on release/pre-order this year and none of them has even broken £30 inc shipping
most of them are £25 which is perfectly reasonable imo
rhuitron 3rd May 2008, 16:57 Quote
OK.

I went the last Nvidia Geforce LAN party in 2007. ( Alameda-Area51! YEAH! )
Before I left, Per UN-usual, I bought the Special edition. Costing me $60-$70.

This is Unusual becasue, normally, I get my games through other means. ;-) And if I like them, Purchase them.

But when I got to the party I was given a free second copy. (Non special edition)
And a lot of other people where given a copy as well.
We had 400+ people registered and present at the party. Even though Nvidia was in part of the title, It still cost them to give almost 400 copies away to us all.

These guys made a wonderful product, and now, are all but hurt that pirates have " Taken " away from their projected Income!
To me, this comment is the same as them being a little b*t*H crying to mommy, "He took my lunch money!"
When we all know damn well, that piracy is good, but there are still Good fans ( *hem* Hem* Me ), that will actually buy the product if it is good. And even if it where not! People still buy Games!!

Gosh, the game is actually even difficult for MANY Pc's to run. That right there cut a big chunk of profit, alone!
CardJoe 3rd May 2008, 18:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish
its NOT £30-40 for a brand new pc game
i've bought several games on release/pre-order this year and none of them has even broken £30 inc shipping
most of them are £25 which is perfectly reasonable imo

Wait a week or two and it's ussually just 17 - 20 quid off Play.com
tommythetim 5th May 2008, 02:12 Quote
Do they really think that it's just the PC that's being pirated, it's everything that's being pirated, go to any torrent site and there's rips and cracks for every game system. Whether it be Pc, Ps3, 360 Wii. Just wait till bluray hardware and media prices collapse there will be mod chips for the ps3 too.
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