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British Game Republic Academy launched

British Game Republic Academy launched

Sheffield Hallam, Bradford and Hull Universities have teamed up with developers to create the UK's first games academy.

The UK may not be the biggest, baddest or fastest country in the world - but when we do get where we want to be, at least we get there in style!

After a lot of whinging from UK developers and the sad news that Britain had fallen in the international games development charts, the UKs first official games academy has been launched.

Formed from departments at Bradford, Hull and Sheffield Hallam Universities, the academy will be officially titled the 'Game Republic Academy', though what makes them a republic isn't clarified at all.

Reportedly, the academy will be supported by three major UK developers; Rockstar UK, Team17 and Sumo Digital. The trio of developers will support students by providing them with work and experience during the summer months and allotting them studio space in their final years in which they will create finished games.

There is also a range of scholarships available to students who show potential, which will be funded by local government and the aforementioned developers.

Oh, and while we're talking about University, why not pop into the forums and pass your congratulations on to forum member AntiHero, who recently got into University too. Well done indeed!

Think corporations should stay out of education and that students should do more than sit around eating Pot Noodles and scratching themselves, or is this games academy A Good Idea? Let us know what you think in the discussion page.

12 Comments

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Omnituens 12th July 2007, 20:40 Quote
2 years too late for me :(
bilbothebaggins 12th July 2007, 21:01 Quote
Many industries seem to enter win-win engagements with universities ... I guess it also can be A Good Thing with the gaming industry ...
DXR_13KE 12th July 2007, 21:35 Quote
very cool!
Bungle 12th July 2007, 21:50 Quote
Awaiting the next Peter Molyneux.
evilgreenie 12th July 2007, 23:47 Quote
Question - is it not better to spend 3 years hacking out a kick-ass series of mods and building a reputation online rather than slaving away on a brand-new, untested academic course... Sure the sponsors will get to cherry-pick the best developers, but my feeling is this course will be sold more to wannabes who'll end up with a bit of paper and zilch-else at the end of it..
mattthegamer463 13th July 2007, 03:53 Quote
Oh thank god. I thought it was about a university for people to learn how to game better at.

Thank god its a development school. Thats actually a decent idea, hopefully it works well. I can definitely see developers getting in to get first dibs on new upcoming developers. It could produce some profoundly different developers in the way its a course and not just teaching yourself or getting help from forums. This shall prove interesting.

What is with that republic deal? Its a school, not a country. ;)
CardJoe 13th July 2007, 10:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilgreenie
Question - is it not better to spend 3 years hacking out a kick-ass series of mods and building a reputation online rather than slaving away on a brand-new, untested academic course... Sure the sponsors will get to cherry-pick the best developers, but my feeling is this course will be sold more to wannabes who'll end up with a bit of paper and zilch-else at the end of it..

Trust me, this business is all about WHO you know, not just the experience you get from mods.
DougEdey 13th July 2007, 10:28 Quote
Agree with Joe here. I know a few people that have now got awesome jobs through networking in the games industry. Reflections, Virtual Playground, Blitz to name a few. But I think this is just a formal way of doing a Sandwich Degree. Most students at my uni that do a placement in games go back to the company when they're done.
Mister_X 13th July 2007, 12:12 Quote
well Its somewhere for the future McDonalds employees to hang out


/me not bitter at all that this wasn't around in my day.
Vonpo 13th July 2007, 13:08 Quote
I think the idea looks great on paper, we will just have to wait and see how this will be implemented. This may as well spark a new trend in creating game academy's through out the world. Which is a great thing, meaning fresh and promising game developers are easier to find and heir ;)
Nix 13th July 2007, 18:22 Quote
Any idea when they are taking applicants. Ive just finished my BSc Computer Games Technology at Portsmouth University and im looking to do a masters
Amon 13th July 2007, 18:24 Quote
I'm guessing this is along the lines of what the IADT offers. Not a bad idea either!
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