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Adobe kills 64-bit Flash Player

Adobe kills 64-bit Flash Player

While Adobe Flash Player 10.1 might be wowing the 32-bit crowd, the 64-bit release is nowhere to be seen.

Adobe might have finally released the full version of Flash Player 10.1 - which includes hardware acceleration during video playback - but it's come at a cost: the removal of the 64-bit edition for Linux.

The beta version of Adobe's Flash Player, which was built on the previous generation Flash Player 10.0 and released for Linux back in 2008, was designed to allow the use of a native 64-bit browser and plugin architecture on compatible operating systems - and was supposed to be followed-up by Windows and Macintosh releases.

Sadly, Flash Player 10.1 appears to have killed those hopes - at least for now. According to Ars Technica, Adobe has completely dropped the 64-bit Linux release - apparently removing it from their site altogether - claiming that "significant architectural changes" are needed, and that it's quicker to start again than attempt to adapt the releases already carried out.

While the company claims that the plan is still to release a native 64-bit Flash Player "for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux 64-bit platforms in an upcoming major release of Flash Player," it fails to provide any timescales on when we might see such a release - and appears to be leaving those who were relying on the 64-bit plugin on their Linux installs high and dry until it decides to release its newly-rewritten version. Thankfully, the old method of using nspluginwrapper to add the 32-bit Flash Player plugin to your 64-bit browser is still an option.

Is a 64-bit version of every piece of software important? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

34 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
BlackMage23 16th June 2010, 11:47 Quote
Better to get it right I guess. Everything will move to 64 bit sooner or later
RichCreedy 16th June 2010, 12:07 Quote
yes it is, have you seen flash based websites on 64bit internet explorer, red x here red x there, red x bloody everywhere.
Sonofalich 16th June 2010, 12:22 Quote
Well if you use Internet Explorer, I think you have more issues than seeing red X's.
zimbloggy 16th June 2010, 12:53 Quote
who needs a 64 bit browser?
Almightyrastus 16th June 2010, 13:10 Quote
I really don't get why this is taking so long for them to do. it is single handedly holding up the development of fast 64 bit browsers as so much stuff online uses flash. I have used IE x64 on occasion and with a decent connection it is so fast at rendering the page.
RichCreedy 16th June 2010, 13:40 Quote
yes 64 bit internet explorer is faster than firefox/chrome/safari at rendering a page, so long as there is no flash on the page, cos no 64bit flash support.

i wish they would hurry up, maybe they should just ask microsoft to do it, lol
bw67958 16th June 2010, 15:22 Quote
What's the benefit of 64 bit browser?
thehippoz 16th June 2010, 16:21 Quote
yeah no doubt.. well least they're working on it
Madness_3d 16th June 2010, 17:35 Quote
As said before it's really not a big deal :-\
ssj12 16th June 2010, 19:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by zimbloggy
who needs a 64 bit browser?

64-bit OS users.
Madness_3d 16th June 2010, 19:32 Quote
Nah, you can run a 32* browser in a 64* OS. So who cares :)
TSR2 16th June 2010, 20:00 Quote
And you can run a 16 bit browser in a 32 bit OS :)
Madness_3d 16th June 2010, 20:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSR2
And you can run a 16 bit browser in a 32 bit OS :)

Everybody's Happy :D
Vigilante 16th June 2010, 20:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by zimbloggy
who needs a 64 bit browser?

64-bit software is intrinsically more secure than 32-bit since it cannot have its memory injected to from another running application.

An example of why this is important:

Say a vulnerability is found and exploited to run a keylogger on your machine. On a 64-bit version of Windows, it will be able to inject itself into any running 32-bit application (like it could on 32-bit windows) and record keystrokes that way. the reason it would do that, is because it cannot directly capture keystrokes by hooking into the system keyboard driver, as it's protected. If your browser is 64-bit, this type of side attack is completely avoided.

A secondary example is specifically relating to Adobe: Everyone and their dog knows that flash is notoriously insecure. A simple port to 64-bit (which Adobe would have you believe is some major undertaking) would instantly tighten it up, preventing a good portion of the vulnerabilities they find so hard to keep out of their software in the first place.

A 64-bit version of flash for Windows is the only block left to move before we can finally start to see a major improvement in browser security - sandboxes and the like are great, but not perfect, in a 32-bit environment.

Hurry up Adobe, we asked you 8 years ago for this!
leslie 16th June 2010, 21:16 Quote
I lost faith in Adobe years ago.

They just doesn't really seem to care about Flash anymore. In fact, unless it's one of their big buck products, they don't seem to care much at all.
Mirceac 16th June 2010, 22:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by zimbloggy
who needs a 64 bit browser?

Apparently there is a version of linux 64bit that comes with a 64bit native browser... and people don't like to downgrade from it to get flash player...

I am not an apple fun but as Steve Jobs said adobe is lazy...
Where is Flash Player 64bit for Windows?
I'm not an apple fun, really I'm not! But as Steve Jobs said "Adobe is lazy"

HTML5 works on 64bit!!!

- From a web developer.
jrs77 16th June 2010, 23:04 Quote
To be fair, it's not just Adobe Flash that lacks good 64bit-support... 64bit-stuff is basically everywhere a problem... drivers, software etc.

The only reason to have a 64bit-system is to have more then 3GB RAM available, but if you don't need this, then it's a total waste of efforts so far.

:(
gavomatic57 16th June 2010, 23:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
To be fair, it's not just Adobe Flash that lacks good 64bit-support... 64bit-stuff is basically everywhere a problem... drivers, software etc.

The only reason to have a 64bit-system is to have more then 3GB RAM available, but if you don't need this, then it's a total waste of efforts so far.

:(

And we could still live in caves...they did the job...

The lack of 64bit Flash is possibly the reason why 64bit browsers aren't mainstream. Still, here's hoping HTML5 takes Flash out of the equation.
Krayzie_B.o.n.e. 17th June 2010, 01:35 Quote
It seems the weak are always holding back the strong like consoles are holding back the power of PC gaming and now Adobe is holding back IE 64 bit. I'm no fan of IE (love Google Chrome) but IE 64 is blazing fast.

I wish programmers get on the ball because I really love using my 64 bit OS
jrs77 17th June 2010, 11:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by gavomatic57
And we could still live in caves...they did the job...

The lack of 64bit Flash is possibly the reason why 64bit browsers aren't mainstream. Still, here's hoping HTML5 takes Flash out of the equation.

I'd like to live in a Villa with a huge garden and a full-size swimming-pool, that's no question for sure, but 100% 64-bit-systems are not going to happen because of lacking software and drivers.

And as I don't want to live in a half-finished Villa without water in the pool etc I'm sticking to my appartment until the Villa is finished.
Gareth Halfacree 17th June 2010, 11:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
I'd like to live in a Villa with a huge garden and a full-size swimming-pool, that's no question for sure, but 100% 64-bit-systems are not going to happen because of lacking software and drivers.
I'm running a 100% 64-bit system right now with no problems at all. Ubuntu 10.04.

Granted, I'm using the now-removed 64-bit Flash plugin, but so long as I keep a copy of that somewhere I need no 32-bit software at all.
RichCreedy 17th June 2010, 20:03 Quote
jrs what you say about driver and software support for 64 bit being rubbish, may have been true for 64 bit windows xp and vista, a couple of years ago, but it has improved massively, in the last year or so
leslie 17th June 2010, 23:33 Quote
For those saying it doesn't matter...
The next version of Windows is not going to even be offered in 32bit.
Would you even want to run Windows 8 on 3 gigs?

And people wonder why proprietary stinks?
okenobi 3rd July 2010, 15:22 Quote
FFS!! This really annoys me.

x64 has been around for at least 5yrs and has been increasing widely adopted in the Windows world with Vista and particularly 7. Everything needs to be 64bit yesterday.

Let people with 32bit stuff continue with what they already have and put all the dev time into x64. Seriously - what's hard about that?
gavomatic57 5th July 2010, 13:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
I'd like to live in a Villa with a huge garden and a full-size swimming-pool, that's no question for sure, but 100% 64-bit-systems are not going to happen because of lacking software and drivers.

And as I don't want to live in a half-finished Villa without water in the pool etc I'm sticking to my appartment until the Villa is finished.

If this was 2007, you'd have a point.
boiled_elephant 5th July 2010, 20:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madness_3d
Nah, you can run a 32* browser in a 64* OS. So who cares :)

Me, because running 32-bit apps in compatibility mode on a 64-bit OS makes them far more likely to crash, freeze, lag, and generally behave like a politician being asked about oral sex. I dearly wish Adobe would sort their **** out so I could move to a 64-bit browser, because they're much faster and more stable.

And to those going "lol 64, this isn't the future, mayyyn": it is the future, x64 OSes and software have been around for years and Adobe are just being crabby luddites and not getting their act together.
schmidtbag 18th August 2010, 00:47 Quote
you can still find the old 64 bit flash lying around. i'm using it right now and i get almost no glitches at all. actually, almost every failure i get with flash is because of opera
Cthippo 18th August 2010, 02:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leslie
Would you even want to run Windows 8 on 3 gigs?

Why in god's name would an OS need 3 Gigs of memory to run? To me that's just absurd and wasteful. With things like Puppy linux that can run happily off 128 MB of memory it seems utterly ridiculous that any OS should need 3 Gigs. i can see certain programs needing that much memory, but not an OS
Dark Matter 18th August 2010, 11:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by schmidtbag
you can still find the old 64 bit flash lying around. i'm using it right now and i get almost no glitches at all. actually, almost every failure i get with flash is because of opera

Worth looking for? :)
wuyanxu 18th August 2010, 11:46 Quote
who needs flash anyway.

Flashblock is the ONLY reason i keep coming back to relatively slow Firefox on my netbook.

move on, and die please!
saspro 18th August 2010, 13:27 Quote
Has anyone actually read this article first?
It's just dropped the 64bit 10.1 release for Linux, that's all.
Krikkit 18th August 2010, 13:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuyanxu
who needs flash anyway.

Flashblock is the ONLY reason i keep coming back to relatively slow Firefox on my netbook.

move on, and die please!

You can get a flashblocker on Chrome now too.
maverik-sg1 18th August 2010, 13:37 Quote
AMD first introduced the 64bit cpu for the home user over 10 yrs ago and yet here we all are still in a mish-mash of 32 and 64 bit apps, multi-core home user cpu's have been around a long time too.

Interestingly steam suggests that both 64bit OS's and multicore cpu's are mainstream.

It's time legacy products stopped holding us back and we moved to an exclusive 64bit and multicore age... of course I say that as this is what I have, but even without that, I'd still champion it.
CAPSLOCK 19th August 2010, 10:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krayzie_B.o.n.e.
It seems the weak are always holding back the strong...

Hello, my name is CAPSLOCK, and I am here to ask you a question.

Is a man not entitled to the 64 bits of his PC?


NO! Says the man at Microsoft, it belongs to the XBOX!

NO! Says the man at Adobe, it belongs to the old browsers.

NO! Says the man in the industry, it belongs to the average PC built in 1998.


But I rejected those answers. I chose the impossible. I chose.... Krayzie_B.o.n.e!

Where the Strong will not be held back by the weak. Where the New would not need fear the old. Where the 64 bit OS's would not be constrained by the 32 bit architecture.

And by the bits of your OS, Krayzie_B.o.n.e can be yours too.



No harsh feeling mate, it's all a good laugh.
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