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Psystar launches Mac OS install tool

Psystar launches Mac OS install tool

The new Rebel EFI package from Psystar allows users to install Mac OS X on selected non-Apple hardware.

Ersatz Mac OS machine manufacturer Psystar is again courting lawsuits from Apple with the launch of a commercial application for the installation of Mac OS X Snow Leopard on non-Apple hardware.

As reported over on CNet, the software suite - dubbed Rebel EFI - allows users to install Mac OS X on to most machines with an Intel Core 2 Duo, Quad, i7, or Xeon Nehalem processor.

The package is available in a free 'demo' version for checking compatibility, although the company states that this offers "limited hardware functionality as compared with the full version."

Speaking of which, the full release of the software will set consumers back $49.99 (£30) but allow a full, unrestricted install on the hardware of your choice.

While this is far from the first commercial product we've seen that allows consumers to install Mac OS X on non-Apple hardware - that honour goes to the EFi-X modchip first spotted back in September last year - it's a brave move by a company which is still being sued by Apple for offering systems with Mac OS X pre-installed, and has only recently left Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

Once thing is for sure: Apple is unlikely to take this lying down.

Do you believe that users should be able to install Mac OS X on any hardware they like, or is Psystar simply trying to make a quick buck off Apple's efforts? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

35 Comments

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Redbeaver 23rd October 2009, 17:01 Quote
i like to think its best for consumers (but naturally, not for Apple) that we are able to install any software in any hardware that can technically support it.
moshpit 23rd October 2009, 17:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redbeaver
i like to think its best for consumers (but naturally, not for Apple) that we are able to install any software in any hardware that can technically support it.
I'm with Redbeaver on this. I think Apple is too stuck on itself. It's easy to act superior when you have such a tiny hardware base to support. Apple would CRUMBLE trying to support the vast hardware selection MS supports. They're incapable of it or OSX would be more open. Apple is in it for the profit. If they thought they could profit off of it, they would do it. They just know they'd get their heads handed to them.
MaverickWill 23rd October 2009, 17:11 Quote
Let the litigation begin!

Psystar make me smile. They're helping Apple to sell more software to people who wouldn't buy Macs (I'd assume for price reasons), and Apple are trying to drive them into the ground. Way to go, Apple! Crap all over your capitalism!
iwog 23rd October 2009, 17:15 Quote
I'm tempted to crack out the popcorn again, but if I did that for every mac battle that erupts I'd be morbidly obese by now. Why is it that one company can invoke so much conflict, both from users and other corporations?
Er-El 23rd October 2009, 17:30 Quote
So it won't work on my AMD Phenom II (AM3) system? Damn.
frojoe 23rd October 2009, 17:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by moshpit

I'm with Redbeaver on this. I think Apple is too stuck on itself. It's easy to act superior when you have such a tiny hardware base to support. Apple would CRUMBLE trying to support the vast hardware selection MS supports. They're incapable of it or OSX would be more open.

That's kind of the point for a lot of non sophisticated users. They don't really care how many graphics cards that are supported, if the few apple offer work very smoothly for them. What we look at as a negative, is a selling point for many. Personally I would like OSX to be open to install on all hardware(I'll be using the efi-x in my next build), but their company isn't built around offering choices, but making things simple.
Quote:
Originally Posted by moshpit

Apple is in it for the profit. If they thought they could profit off of it, they would do it. They just know they'd get their heads handed to them.

No, a company in it for profit, sue them. To think that M$ and all companies don't have the same goal is naive. A companies goal is to make a profit, that's it, and Apple is currently very good at it.
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/09/10/19/apple_profits_surge_46_on_record_sales_of_3m_macs_7_4m_iphones.html
proxess 23rd October 2009, 17:42 Quote
Psystar way to go! +1 to making people smile!
stonedsurd 23rd October 2009, 17:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redbeaver
i like to think its best for consumers (but naturally, not for Apple) that we are able to install any software in any hardware that can technically support it.
That's the point. Apple certifies it's OS to be 100% on a limited set of hardware - basically only the stuff that they sell.
Doing it on anything else is a gamble.
The Infamous Mr D 23rd October 2009, 17:54 Quote
Now I'd think this would be an awesome idea. I'd use OSX on my PC as I find it to be a really efficient OS. But the price premium on Apple hardware is far too much to justify the outlay. But I'd happily pay for a copy of OSX. Of course, Apple will no doubt gatecrash this party before too long. Shame, they would have made some money out of me. Oh well. Gimme a copy of Win 7 please!
Ross1 23rd October 2009, 18:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Er-El
So it won't work on my AMD Phenom II (AM3) system? Damn.

you have to bear in mind apple use intel exclusively.

im a little confused as to why you would want osx on your pc. its just very limiting, like if a chef had a first rate kitchen but would only use a microwave because it made cooking simple and easy.
cgthomas 23rd October 2009, 18:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ross1
like if a chef had a first rate kitchen but would only use a microwave because it made cooking simple and easy.

^ +1 to that
wuyanxu 23rd October 2009, 18:15 Quote
OSX is more powerful than it looks, especially once you get into shell scripts. Windows batch files on the other hand......

i downloaded that iso file as demo, looks like the compatibility test would only run in Mac OSX, which IMHO is quite useless for most people.
vampalan 23rd October 2009, 19:16 Quote
This mod might just be worth a try, I'll give that a spin later when I find a copy of OSX from Apple Store.
flibblesan 23rd October 2009, 22:07 Quote
wuyanxu: the ISO from Psystar is bootable. You can use it to install OSX.
dire_wolf 23rd October 2009, 22:30 Quote
Am I missing something? You can install Mac Os without this tool with a few easy to find tutorials
koola 23rd October 2009, 23:18 Quote
I've just installed Snow Leopard on my Dell mini 10v, it's rock solid and everything works great.

Very tempted to buy the the new 27" imac though...
HourBeforeDawn 23rd October 2009, 23:28 Quote
you know if Mac just opened there OS to be installed on custom built systems and stated at most you get no support from us even still Im sure their market share would probably jump from the sad 4-8% to probably 30% over night and they would be making so much more money but I guess that would also force them to drop the ridiculous pricing they have on their systems a bit.
Oclocker 23rd October 2009, 23:32 Quote
tempted to apple by the 27" Imac - then saw UK vs US pricing Over $500 dearer is criminal! Tempted to get a pirate copy just to spite them barstewards :(
DriftCarl 23rd October 2009, 23:41 Quote
I dont understand why microsoft gets sanctioned for simply pre-installing their OS with IE8 and apple dont get touched for pre-installing OSX with safari and also limiting OSX to only its special branded hardware, and also feel the need to stealk nokia technology and think its ok not to compensate them
SNIPERMikeUK 24th October 2009, 10:30 Quote
You can install windows on a mac, where is the problem with windows users doing the same. Apple only have to increase the price of the OS to compensate.
BLC 24th October 2009, 13:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by koola
I've just installed Snow Leopard on my Dell mini 10v, it's rock solid and everything works great.

Very tempted to buy the the new 27" imac though...

W00t! Good to see another Dell Mini owner who has gone down the OSX road :). I had OSX (10.5.5) on my Mini 9 until recently, and everything works brilliantly - except for the mobile broadband. It worked, but it appeared to be defaulting to GPRS and not using HSDPA, with no way of changing it. I've gone back to XP for now. Was very easy to install and worked just like a "real" Mac. Of course, it helps that the Mini 9 & 10v use the same hardware as "real" Mac laptops, so there's very little customising required.

I would never replace Windows on my desktop rig for one reason alone: games.

However for the vast majority of the retail market, OSX on a wider range of hardware would go down a storm - it would sell like hotcakes. Even if it were restricted to certain PCs or components (think "Mac OS Compatible" badge on a PC), people would buy it in droves. Like it or not, the OS is very simple to use and very powerful to boot. It's a lot less intimidating to a new user than even Win7.

Of course, none of the above points are likely to sway the BT/CPC audience ;)
Er-El 24th October 2009, 15:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ross1
you have to bear in mind apple use intel exclusively.

im a little confused as to why you would want osx on your pc. its just very limiting, like if a chef had a first rate kitchen but would only use a microwave because it made cooking simple and easy.
I completely agree. It's just something that'd be fun to try out for a couple hours.
Zurechial 24th October 2009, 19:31 Quote
The people who don't see the advantage of being able to install OSX on their non-Apple systems obviously haven't seen the inside of a typical Recording Studio or Graphic Design Studio before.

Those workplaces are dominated by Apple through clever marketing where uninformed people are convinced that Apple systems are somehow 'simply better' for those purposes.
This means in turn that many of the software tools used heavily in those areas are tailored for use on OSX (Protools etc).

It also means that when the owner of a design studio or recording studio is showing off their facilities and equipment to potential clients, there's an expectation of seeing an Apple system somewhere in the list - A sort of snobbery whereby studios without an Apple aren't considered fully-equipped.

Being able to install OSX on an existing non-Apple system would make it a lot easier for a budding recording engineer or illustrator to join the 'Apple club' and be fully-equipped for a lot less, or at the least it would allow them to work on their skills and familiarity with OSX for the sake of fitting into the industry.

I'm not a fan of OSX but a stable method of installing it on my i7 studio rig to multi-boot between Win7/OSX/XP would be a very nice advantage for me.
BLC 24th October 2009, 19:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurechial
The people who don't see the advantage of being able to install OSX on their non-Apple systems obviously haven't seen the inside of a typical Recording Studio or Graphic Design Studio before.

Those workplaces are dominated by Apple through clever marketing where uninformed people are convinced that Apple systems are somehow 'simply better' for those purposes.
This means in turn that many of the software tools used heavily in those areas are tailored for use on OSX (Protools etc).

It also means that when the owner of a design studio or recording studio is showing off their facilities and equipment to potential clients, there's an expectation of seeing an Apple system somewhere in the list - A sort of snobbery whereby studios without an Apple aren't considered fully-equipped.

Being able to install OSX on an existing non-Apple system would make it a lot easier for a budding recording engineer or illustrator to join the 'Apple club' and be fully-equipped for a lot less, or at the least it would allow them to work on their skills and familiarity with OSX for the sake of fitting into the industry.

I'm not a fan of OSX but a stable method of installing it on my i7 studio rig to multi-boot between Win7/OSX/XP would be a very nice advantage for me.

Sadly, you have hit the nail on the head there. In the past, an Apple system used to be pretty much essential (from a technical point of view): firewire didn't really enjoy much support on the PC, but has been used on the Mac for a long time. And Firewire is far superior to USB for pro-level audio equipment; it's pretty much essential when you're dealing with 24 channels of audio going to and from the computer. PCs have long since caught up and overtaken Macs, but the Mac snobbery and exclusivity still exists.

Ironically, I happened to pop into the new Apple store in Cardiff earlier... Lots of shiny-shiny toys...
Ross1 24th October 2009, 21:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurechial
The people who don't see the advantage of being able to install OSX on their non-Apple systems obviously haven't seen the inside of a typical Recording Studio or Graphic Design Studio before.

i would be one of those people who dont really see the point of osx... and funnily enough im in my last year of a sound engineering degree.....

i see your point that maybe it would help familiarise yourself with logic and/or final cut. firstly its a small niche market. secondly, those two arent really the things you need a lot of time to grasp fully. thirdly, im not sure a hackintosh necessarily fulfils an airhead clients expectation of an apple system. if they think thats whats needed, they probably want to see the shiny shiny apple casing too.

oh, and you mentioned protools specifically.... which works just as well, IMO better on windows.
Saivert 26th October 2009, 00:42 Quote
I would really like to see what Psystar's rebel EFI does that Netkas PC_EFI emulation layer doesn't.

The Hackintosh community has been working hard for a long time now perfecting it's custom bootloaders and EFI emulation to the point that you can install straight off of a Retail Snow Leopard DVD and most stuff works.
You only need certain drivers for graphics, PS/2 input devices, and other non-Mac hardware.
If you have a Intel system you can boot from vanilla kernel too. You only need custom kernel if you have a CPU not supported by Apple natively (like AMD and older Intel chips).

Apple uses a lot of open source code anyways. It's not like Mac OS X is that special.
But they kind of are alone with using Objective-C as programming language and the frameworks Carbon and Cocoa has not been ported to other operating systems. Which if was the case would allow you to run Mac OS X apps on Windows/Linux (recompiled).
I guess most people don't care about the apps on Mac OS X after all. They just want the flashy OS itself.
Scootiep 26th October 2009, 04:46 Quote
"Once thing is for sure: Apple is unlikely to take this lying down."

/cough
Typo
/cough

At least, last time I checked, you didn't spell one with a "C". :p
ParanoidSWE 26th October 2009, 07:50 Quote
Well i see the problem with psystar that they are parasites sucking off what people have been making for free.. i know sevel tools and we have a new in the builds to compite heads on with psystars rebel efi, that can do the same as they can but are better and are free...

All the tools and a lot of easy guides are out there the biggest problem is just psystar have better pr because we dont want to be hunted by apple...

So lest breake down what you get for the 50$ (soon to be 99$)

Bootloader, well there are Chameleon 2 and pc_efi v10 that do the same but are free.
Support, there we have irc and some really big forums.
Auto kext finder. Most systems dont need anything more then 4-7 kexts to run osx86 and thoes can be found with google or with the help of people on irc (Just know it might be short answers but you will get the kexts name)
updated bootloader (Ohh wait when apple have owned psystars a$$ you wont get anymore updates and the auto kext downloader dont work anymore)

So as it is i cant see the reson to get the psystar one other then they have better PR so they are known to the public.

Ohhh and just to say it.. i dont condole warzing the os.. i do own a Familiy License of Snow Leopard and i will recomend others that are seruios about this to get a license.. it is only 29$ and then you have giving some back to apple. :)

Well that was that from me now.. anyone want links then hit me a pm.. :)
Shagbag 26th October 2009, 08:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DriftCarl
I dont understand why microsoft gets sanctioned for simply pre-installing their OS with IE8 and apple dont get touched for pre-installing OSX with safari
DriftCarl, it's about competitive markets and controlling monopoly power so that consumers benefit. Windows is the dominant desktop OS (not in the server room, that's a different story). Microsoft has, in the past, abused its position and has been convicted on a number of occasions for doing so (Google 'Microsoft Anti-trust' and you'll see how and when - don't Bing for it though because you won't find it - and that's another story). The European Commission, acting on a complaint from Opera, IBM, Sun, et. al. stepped in to prevent further possible abuse of consumers by Microsoft of its desktop monopoly. The importance of the Web Browser is set to increase with many predicting it to be the dominant platform of the future. All the key players know this and that's why the EC acted as it did. It needs to be remembered that the EC didn't prevent Microsoft from including IE in Win7. All it did was force consumers to make a choice about what browser they use. Many of those consumers wouldn't even be aware they had a choice were it not for the EC's actions. Those consumers would have continued to use a web browser that is (a) the least compliant with web standards, and (b) among the slowest of its peers.
gavomatic57 26th October 2009, 09:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC


Ironically, I happened to pop into the new Apple store in Cardiff earlier... Lots of shiny-shiny toys...

I haven't been in there yet, but its nice to know it is there just in case my MBP or ipod decide to fail!

I may wait and see how the 12-core Mac Pro's are priced though..!
BLC 26th October 2009, 12:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by gavomatic57
I haven't been in there yet, but its nice to know it is there just in case my MBP or ipod decide to fail!

I may wait and see how the 12-core Mac Pro's are priced though..!

I had to pop in, never been in an Apple store before. Apple can make some very good looking kit, and it's rather an impressive sight in there...

Be warned though: St David's 2 is dizzyingly large - looking up at the ceiling made me feel all light headed. Although it looks like the perfect refuge in the case of a zombie apocalypse.... :P
gavomatic57 26th October 2009, 13:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
I had to pop in, never been in an Apple store before. Apple can make some very good looking kit, and it's rather an impressive sight in there...

Be warned though: St David's 2 is dizzyingly large - looking up at the ceiling made me feel all light headed. Although it looks like the perfect refuge in the case of a zombie apocalypse.... :P

I've been slightly put off by the shop lineup - 58 stores, 50 of them sell nothing but women's clothes. Like Cardiff needed any more bleedin' clothes shops.
Nicholas 26th October 2009, 16:32 Quote
Well having a macbook pro with windows vista running under boot camp on mac osx snow leopard, its comparable to a lot of pc gaming rigs (laptop based). It's funny that windows runs better on my mac.

I love this company for making a software to help install osx on a pc - i would run boot camp with windows 7 if I purchased their software.

I don't understand what mac's deal is. I mean if they REALLY want to make a buck....LEAVE THE COMPANY ALONE FOR ONE! - AND FOR 2...

... Keep your prices the same on all hardware - you will STILL MAKE A BIGGER PROFIT by doing one thing and one thing only....


LET STORES WITHIN A 5 MILE RADIUS SELL MAC HARDWARE!!!!! you are killing your sales by limiting how close an outlet can be to another that can sell mac's!


Well I guess... you still need to drop the prices of mac hardware so people will actually build your sh*t at home and not get a pre-assembled box of sh*t. Most cant even afford a memory upgrade! put that in your pipe and smoke it while you try and sue this company mac!
Saivert 26th October 2009, 21:40 Quote
saying that you are better off just because you run a purchased copy of Mac OS X on your Hackintosh doesn't change a thing. Apple would still hang you if they could. They don't want their OS running on anything but a Mac. It's a breach of their EULA actually.

I'm certainly not going to pay for a thing I will have to spend a lot of time getting to run suitably well anyways because it's not officially supported.
BLC 27th October 2009, 09:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by gavomatic57
I've been slightly put off by the shop lineup - 58 stores, 50 of them sell nothing but women's clothes. Like Cardiff needed any more bleedin' clothes shops.

Compared to the rest of town, all the clothes shops in St David's 2 are brutally overpriced. And the reason I know this is that I have been dragged round many of them. Many, MANY of them... Guys, don't ever let your girlfriend/wife/partner/spouse/lover/mistress start dragging you along when they go clothes shopping. Never set that precedent - once you do, it will be expected for life!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saivert
saying that you are better off just because you run a purchased copy of Mac OS X on your Hackintosh doesn't change a thing. Apple would still hang you if they could. They don't want their OS running on anything but a Mac. It's a breach of their EULA actually.

I'm certainly not going to pay for a thing I will have to spend a lot of time getting to run suitably well anyways because it's not officially supported.

I've read up a little bit about EULAs. There is serious doubt as to whether a EULA would actually stand up in court (at least in Europe, I don't know about the US) - it's an agreement that you're effectively forced to accept without having a chance to read it; you can't read the EULA without actually buying the product after all. It means that you're entering into a contract which you have no prior knowledge or understanding of, and there are serious doubts as to whether that's even legal; however, their validity has not been properly tested in court, as far as I'm aware (someone can probably correct me on that, I'm no legal expert). Sure, you could theoretically return the product if you disagreed with the EULA - but by this time you've probably opened the package and the retailer would not be likely to accept a return. There's no way you can fit the entire EULA on a product box. You could potentially go back to Apple for a refund, or take the retailer to court, but that's likely to cost you more money than you paid for the product in the first place.

And no, it's not officially supported, but there is a community out there very dedicated to getting it to run smoothly. Installing OSX on my netbook was simply a matter of downloading and burning a custom boot disk and buying a retail copy of Leopard. Boot from the boot disk, then swap to the OSX disc and from there on in, it's almost exactly the same as a real Mac - the only difference is that you have to install the Dell EFI program on first boot, which is a one-time scripted installation.

Besides, the EULA wording actually states that it cannot be installed on any computer which does not bear the Apple logo - I got a few Apple stickers when I bought my iPod touch, so does anyone want to legitimise their hackintosh install? ;)
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