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Video: Microsoft shows off Xbox One Kinect and design evolution

Video: Microsoft shows off Xbox One Kinect and design evolution

The new Xbox One went through many different design iterations before a final look was decided upon.

With the dust settling after the launch of the Xbox One, Wired has posted a couple of really interesting videos showing the new Kinect in action and how the hardware design of the Xbox One was developed.

The Kinect video shows how the new device includes an IR lamp and receiver that it uses to counteract the potential inconsistency of ambient light sources, providing a consistant - though monochrome - image to work with. The new sensor array can also now track more joint movement, including rudimentary hand and finger movements, and even estimate the forces being applied to different joints.

Up to six people can play using one Kinect and the device will recognise each user, logging them in if they're already registered (no need to say or do anything, it just works as soon as you walk into frame) and tracking the players as the move round the room, swapping their position on screen if they cross over. It will also track which controller is being used by which person. Meanwhile the RGB camera supports 1080p colour video.


As for the design of the Xbox One, Microsoft Senior Industrial Designer Scott Dallmeyer talks through how Microsoft wanted the console to "fit in with the things that are already in your living room", pointing out that where previously the Xbox 360 was vertical and stood out, the new console was to be more subtle.

Dallmeyer also talks about how all the aspects of the console "fit together as a family", though essentially this seems to boil down to them all being black.


As for the controller, Dallmeyer points out that "getting rid of the battery pack was a huge deal", making it easier and more comfortable to hold. He also points out that the new XYAB buttons use a new three-step injection mould process, for what that's worth.

The videos are short and sweet, and definitely worth a watch.

8 Comments

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Ayrto 22nd May 2013, 13:15 Quote
Impressive tech, but it looks like tech in search of an application, rather than arriving to meet a need.

Used on a console, it needs a decent sized room , solid floor and/or tolerant neighbours. Latency will always be an issue . Apparently they've reduced it from 90ms with processing, to around 60ms for kinect 2.0, but that's still too high for [say] a FPS or anything really, beyond casual games.

They sold over 24m kinect units, but how many bought on a promise that wasn't fulfilled in terms of capability or games? How many would get their money back if they could?
samkiller42 22nd May 2013, 13:40 Quote
So, looking at that second vid, it doesn't actually look as big as we all first thought. Win.

Sam
Corky42 22nd May 2013, 13:42 Quote
Im not sure i like the idea of electronics knowing so many details, it seems like we are one step closer to Nineteen Eighty-Four and telescreens
Someone fetch me my tin foil i need to make some headgear
Stanley Tweedle 22nd May 2013, 14:18 Quote
Kinect was the only thing about eggs box that impressed me because it was so advanced (hence it's use in many scientific applications). This new HD kinect looks even more impressive. The rest of the hardware will become a bottleneck rather quickly as is always the case with consoles. Be interesting to see if it gets some worthy motion capture games.
Ayrto 22nd May 2013, 14:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Im not sure i like the idea of electronics knowing so many details, it seems like we are one step closer to Nineteen Eighty-Four and telescreens
Someone fetch me my tin foil i need to make some headgear


Struck by this:
Quote:
"Telescreens do not have night vision technology, thus, they cannot surveil in the dark. This is compensated by the fact that telescreens are incredibly sensitive.

And ...
Quote:
"Telescreens, in addition to being surveillance devices, are also the equivalent of televisions (hence the name), regularly broadcasting false news reports about Oceania's military victories, economic production figures, spirited renditions of the national anthem to heighten patriotism, and Two Minutes Hate, which is a two-minute film of Emmanuel Goldstein's wishes for freedom of speech and press, which the citizens have been trained to disagree with. Much of the telescreen programs are given in Newspeak."
-

With Xbox One's Kinect 2.0 and Fox News we're all set.
Corky42 27th May 2013, 12:57 Quote
It would seem im not the only one worried about Microsoft monitoring everything we do :|

Privacy advocates: Schaar called Xbox One "monitor"

Sorry for the translate :|
Will Microsoft be in for more flak like this ?
I can see they are going to face some really big issues with trying to reassure people with the new kinetic.
Corky42 28th May 2013, 09:25 Quote
Microsoft's new Xbox meets the definition of a surveillance device under some Australian laws.

http://games.ninemsn.com.au/news/privacy-breach-xbox-one-a-twisted-nightmare

Are they going to be forced to include an option to turn off the always on monitoring ?
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