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AMD announces Ryzen 5 hex-core, quad-core line-up

AMD announces Ryzen 5 hex-core, quad-core line-up

AMD's Ryzen 7 family is to be joined by the mid-range Ryzen 5 in April, with six-core and four-core models - boasting 12 and 8 thread support respectively - confirmed.

Following on from the launch of its top-end Ryzen 7 processors earlier this month, AMD has now taken the lid off its mid-range offerings: Ryzen 5, which is to hit shop shelves in April with six-core 12-thread and four-core eight-thread options making up the launch family.

Designed for those who don't need the eight-core 16-thread power of the Ryzen 7 family - which is made up of the Ryzen 7 1800X, Ryzen 7 1700X, and Ryzen 7 1700, the latter of which hobbles the built-in Extended Frequency Range (XFR) automatic overclocking functionality - the Ryzen 5 range is available in six-core and four-core variants. The flagship model is the Ryzen 5 1600X, which is a six-core 12-thread chip running at a 3.6GHz base clock and 4GHz boost clock and supporting the full XFR frequency range. According to AMD, the chip is designed to compete with Intel's Core i5-7600K and boasts a 69 percent performance uplift in the Cinebench R15 multithreaded benchmark - though confirmed figures for other benchmarks were not available at the time of writing.

For those looking to spend less on their Ryzen rig, the Ryzen 5 1600 retains the six cores of its higher-end stablemate but reduces the clock speed to 3.2GHz base and 3.6GHz clock. As a non-X-suffix part, the Ryzen 5 1600 also cuts the peak automatic overclock available from AMD's XFR technology in half compared to the 1600X.

If six cores is too many for your workload, AMD has also announced two Ryzen 5 quad-core parts: the Ryzen R5 1500X, running at 3.5GHz base and 3.7GHz boost; and the Ryzen R5 1400, running at 3.2GHz base and 3.4GHz boost. Both models include support for running eight threads, and are - as with all Ryzen chips - multiplier and frequency unlocked for manual overclocking.

UK pricing for the Ryzen 5 family was not available at the time of writing, but AMD has released US recommended retail prices: the range starts at $249 (around £204 excluding taxes) for the 1600X, drops to $219 (around £179 excluding taxes) for the 1600, $189 (around £155 excluding taxes) for the 1500X, and $169 (around £139 excluding taxes) for the 1400. Given the cost of Ryzen 7 chips, however, it's fair to assume there'll be a 1:1 exchange rate between tax-free US and VAT-inclusive UK pricing, putting the chips at £249, £219, £189, and £169 respectively.

All models are due to hit shop shelves on April 11th in retail packaging: the 1400 will be bundled with a Wraith Stealth heatsink and fan assembly; the 1500X and 1600 will include the larger Wraith Spire; and the 1600X will be sold without a heatsink. AMD has yet to announce a launch date for the Ryzen 3 family, its entry-level range targeting Intel's Core i3 chips, beyond a commitment to launch in the second half of the year.

28 Comments

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Instagib 16th March 2017, 09:51 Quote
Just wondering out loud here; what are the chances there will be ryzen 7s floating around that are locked down to 5s? AMD have employed that tactic in the past with both cpus and gpus.
Gareth Halfacree 16th March 2017, 09:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Instagib
Just wondering out loud here; what are the chances there will be ryzen 7s floating around that are locked down to 5s? AMD have employed that tactic in the past with both cpus and gpus.
A 100% chance. That's how you make processors. Right now, though, the 7s that are sold as 5s will be faulty 7s because it's a new chip on a new process with a correspondingly low yield. In the future, as the yield improves, it's possible that there will be fully-functional Ryzen 7s sold as 5s just to balance demand - and that's when you start being able to potentially unlock them and run them as 7s.
impar 16th March 2017, 10:08 Quote
Greetings!

And they are 3+3 and 2+2 parts.
Wakka 16th March 2017, 10:10 Quote
I remember buying a Phenom II X2 560 BE and not only being able to unlock both the disabled cores, but also giving it a 300Mhz OC. Still a fairly pants chip, but when you factor in what I paid for it, it had some punch in threaded apps.

I'm still holding out for the 1600X I think, if it can stably do 4ghz across all cores on water, that will be plenty enough for me and be the base for my next build.
perplekks45 16th March 2017, 11:10 Quote
I still find it quite strange to release CPUs without coolers in the non-enthusiast market. For £249 it should be quite competitive. But then you add a cooler and you're already closer to 270 or even 300 for an AIO system. Strange.
Gareth Halfacree 16th March 2017, 11:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
I still find it quite strange to release CPUs without coolers in the non-enthusiast market. For £249 it should be quite competitive. But then you add a cooler and you're already closer to 270 or even 300 for an AIO system. Strange.
The argument goes that no self-respecting enthusiast would be seen dead using a stock cooler - even a halfway decent one like Wraith - so there's no point giving 'em something that's going to end up in the bin anyway.
TheMadDutchDude 16th March 2017, 12:11 Quote
None of the X99 lineup comes with a stock cooler for that very reason.
jrs77 16th March 2017, 13:15 Quote
So neither the Ryzen 7 nor the Ryzen 5 will have integrated graphics. Sorry, but that makes any intel counterpart better, especially for workstations that don't need much graphics-power.
Wakka 16th March 2017, 13:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
So neither the Ryzen 7 nor the Ryzen 5 will have integrated graphics. Sorry, but that makes any intel counterpart better, especially for workstations that don't need much graphics-power.

That was always going to be the case - Raven Bridge is supposed to be launching in the 2nd half of the year, with Zen-based cores and Vega-based graphics... should make for a cracking SFF do-it-all shoebox PC.
Gareth Halfacree 16th March 2017, 13:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
So neither the Ryzen 7 nor the Ryzen 5 will have integrated graphics. Sorry, but that makes any intel counterpart better, especially for workstations that don't need much graphics-power.
These are pure-CPU chips, for people using discrete graphics. The Zen-based APUs are coming later, as was always the case.
hyperion 16th March 2017, 13:59 Quote
Both quad cores priced lower than the K series i3 launch. Very interested to see how these overclock.
jrs77 16th March 2017, 14:14 Quote
I'll wait and see, but these new AMD CPUs don't look too impresive to me knowing that they have no integrated graphics and draw as much power as the intel parts that have one.

The R5 1500X has the same corecount, threads, frequencies and TDP as my i7-5775C, but without an iGPU. And that's actually the bit that worries me. How powerful of a CPU will they be able to put into the package, when half of it its occupied by the GPU allready.
perplekks45 16th March 2017, 14:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
The argument goes that no self-respecting enthusiast would be seen dead using a stock cooler - even a halfway decent one like Wraith - so there's no point giving 'em something that's going to end up in the bin anyway.
Hence me explicitly mentioning non-enthusiast markets. Or would you say 1600x is aimed at the enthusiast market? I guess you could argue that since it's the top-end of the mid-market segment. But then 1060s should be considered high-end graphics cards as well, right? ;)
Gareth Halfacree 16th March 2017, 15:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
Hence me explicitly mentioning non-enthusiast markets. Or would you say 1600x is aimed at the enthusiast market?
If it has an X suffix, then it's aimed at the enthusiast market. Simple as that. That's what the X suffix means.

Same with Intel's K suffix - or are you going to argue that the £180 dual-core Core i3-7350K is an entry-level part not aimed at enthusiasts? I mean, it is an i3, after all - so it must be entry-level, right?
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
But then 1060s should be considered high-end graphics cards as well, right? ;)

High End usually equals Enthusiast, but Enthusiast does not always equal High End.

I'd say any graphics card that costs more than about £50 is clearly in the enthusiast region, and the 1060 certainly is - unless you're aware of any entry-level non-enthusiasts dropping 350 notes on watercooled graphics cards?
nimbu 16th March 2017, 16:02 Quote
I feel we often miss a point when we generalise that X is for the enthusiast market. I feel that that market also has its own classifications etc.

For example, I consider myself an enthusiast, but for me price and quietness are strong factors, so i never generally buy top end in the current generation but rather from the previous generation.

Back to Ryzen 5, I am interested to see what these bench at and the price / performance comparison to intels line up.

Also waiting for some proper AMD ITX boards to be released.
DbD 16th March 2017, 16:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by Instagib
Just wondering out loud here; what are the chances there will be ryzen 7s floating around that are locked down to 5s? AMD have employed that tactic in the past with both cpus and gpus.
A 100% chance. That's how you make processors. Right now, though, the 7s that are sold as 5s will be faulty 7s because it's a new chip on a new process with a correspondingly low yield. In the future, as the yield improves, it's possible that there will be fully-functional Ryzen 7s sold as 5s just to balance demand - and that's when you start being able to potentially unlock them and run them as 7s.

That's not exactly smart sales is it. You make this big expensive 8 core cpu and then break it so it doesn't work fully and sell it for half the price it's worth. The whole setup doesn't make much sense tbh - I assume as they are making 8 core cpu's most of the working cpu's will be 8 core chips, and then you'll have some left overs that can be sold as 6 core chips, and then finally the odd dud that's only good for 4 cores. Yet the market is going to demand a lot more of the cheapest chips - most chips sold will be 4 cores, then some six cores and finally the odd expensive 8 core?
Gareth Halfacree 16th March 2017, 16:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
That's not exactly smart sales is it. You make this big expensive 8 core cpu and then break it so it doesn't work fully and sell it for half the price it's worth.
It absolutely is smart sales, yes, which is why every semiconductor company in the world does it.

You sell more of your cheaper products than your expensive products. Let's say for the last generation you sold three entry-level chips for every flagship chip. So, you build three million entry-level chips and one million flagship chips.

Trouble is, turns out you misjudged demand. There's only a market for 500,000 flagship chips, but your entry-level chips are flying off the shelves. Do you:

A) Cut the price of the flagship chip, irritating those that already bought them and damaging the value proposition and price at which you can sell future flagship chips?
B) Resign yourself to a warehouse filled with 500,000 unsold flagship chips and write it off as a loss, while irritating those who want to buy your entry-level chips because there's no more stock?
or
C) Lock down the high-level chips and repackage them as entry-level models then sell them, which meets demand for the entry-level part, gets you something for the high-end parts that would otherwise have been mouldering in a warehouse before heading to landfill, and pleases both the customers who wanted an entry-level part and can now buy one and those who bought the top-end model and who aren't about to see the thing's price slashed in half. Oh, and doesn't stop you from pricing the follow-up flagship at the same high level as its predecessor (but perhaps only making half as many this time).

If you answered anything other than C, then I'd advise against starting a technology business...
perplekks45 16th March 2017, 16:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
If it has an X suffix, then it's aimed at the enthusiast market. Simple as that. That's what the X suffix means.

Same with Intel's K suffix - or are you going to argue that the £180 dual-core Core i3-7350K is an entry-level part not aimed at enthusiasts? I mean, it is an i3, after all - so it must be entry-level, right?

High End usually equals Enthusiast, but Enthusiast does not always equal High End.

I'd say any graphics card that costs more than about £50 is clearly in the enthusiast region, and the 1060 certainly is - unless you're aware of any entry-level non-enthusiasts dropping 350 notes on watercooled graphics cards?

Well, yes and no really. I personally wouldn't consider a dual core CPU enthusiast in 2017, K or no K.

But I guess it all depends on where you draw the line between mainstream and enthusiast. Buying a discrete graphics card, in my eyes, does not make you an enthusiast by definition. Not in 2017, it does not. I do believe there are way more people in the general public who can change a graphics card today than there were 5 or even 10 years ago. Doesn't make them enthusiasts in my book.
DbD 16th March 2017, 17:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
That's not exactly smart sales is it. You make this big expensive 8 core cpu and then break it so it doesn't work fully and sell it for half the price it's worth.
It absolutely is smart sales, yes, which is why every semiconductor company in the world does it.

You sell more of your cheaper products than your expensive products. Let's say for the last generation you sold three entry-level chips for every flagship chip. So, you build three million entry-level chips and one million flagship chips.

Trouble is, turns out you misjudged demand. There's only a market for 500,000 flagship chips, but your entry-level chips are flying off the shelves. Do you:

A) Cut the price of the flagship chip, irritating those that already bought them and damaging the value proposition and price at which you can sell future flagship chips?
B) Resign yourself to a warehouse filled with 500,000 unsold flagship chips and write it off as a loss, while irritating those who want to buy your entry-level chips because there's no more stock?
or
C) Lock down the high-level chips and repackage them as entry-level models then sell them, which meets demand for the entry-level part, gets you something for the high-end parts that would otherwise have been mouldering in a warehouse before heading to landfill, and pleases both the customers who wanted an entry-level part and can now buy one and those who bought the top-end model and who aren't about to see the thing's price slashed in half. Oh, and doesn't stop you from pricing the follow-up flagship at the same high level as its predecessor (but perhaps only making half as many this time).

If you answered anything other than C, then I'd advise against starting a technology business...

If you answered C you're going to go bust fast because if you've got into the situation where C is required you are already up s**t creek. Yes it is smart to sell slightly broken chips at a cheaper price, no it is not smart to break big expensive chips so you can sell them at bargain prices. If you are going to sell lots of cheap chips then you make cheap chips.

As for AMD *misjudging* demand. You are trying to tell me they didn't realise they'd sell more cheap chips then expensive ones?
Gareth Halfacree 16th March 2017, 18:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
Well, yes and no really. I personally wouldn't consider a dual core CPU enthusiast in 2017, K or no K.

Here's the rub: you're talking about your personal opinion, whereas I'm talking about AMD and Intel's targeting. The marketing material makes it very clear: X and K chips are enthusiast products, non-X and non-K chips are mainstream. There are split markets within that, of course: i7s are performance, i5s mainstream, and i3s entry-level - but the 'enthusiast/non-enthusiast' is effectively differentiated by the suffix.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
If you answered C you're going to go bust fast because if you've got into the situation where C is required you are already up s**t creek.
D'you want to tell that to Nvidia? Intel, perhaps? 'Cos they both do it. They all do it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD


As for AMD *misjudging* demand. You are trying to tell me they didn't realise they'd sell more cheap chips then expensive ones?
D'you want to try actually reading the explanation I gave, 'cos you seem to have missed the important part where the company involved did know they were going to sell more cheap chips than expensive ones.

Let's say you're going to make a product. Do you know exactly how many you're going to sell? Of course you don't. AMD - or Intel, or Nvidia, or Samsung, or A. N. Other company - can only forecast projected sales using previous sales data. For Ryzen, it's even more difficult: it's likely to sell more than any other chip family AMD has released in a decade, but by how many? Will the expensive chips sell well because they offer more threads than Intel's equivalents, or poorly because they're weaker for gaming?

Tell you what: you tell me how many R7s and R5s AMD is going to sell in this financial year. If you're within... let's say 10 per cent, I'll donate £50 to a charity of your choice. Easy money for charity, right? 'Cos you know exactly how many they'll sell, and therefore how many of each AMD would have to make?

EDIT:
Tell you what, let's simplify the example. You sell Widget A at £20 and Widget B at £30. You do your market research and predict that 30 people will buy Widget A, 'cos it's cheaper and has most of the features, while 10 people will splash out the extra for Widget B. So, you build 30 Widget As and 10 Widget Bs.

Time comes to sell 'em, and you've got 35 orders for Widget A but only 5 orders for Widget B. Problem, right?

So, if we follow your plan of keeping the Widget B as a Widget B, you end your financial year with £600 from selling all of your Widget As and an extra £150 from sales of the Widget Bs, but a £150 write-down of unsold inventory. Total revenue: £600. Number of pissed off customers: 5.

If you do the sensible thing and turn Widget Bs into Widget As, you get £600 from sales of Widget As, £100 from sales of Widget Bs turned into Widget As, and £150 from sales of the Widget Bs themselves, and you've sold all your inventory so there's no write-down. Total revenue: £850. Number of pissed off customers: 0.

Now, which one of those two approaches is going to be best for the company?
Paulg1971 16th March 2017, 18:39 Quote
I would have thought most people who buy separate CPU and Motherboards know what they are doing and would buy a cooler that meets their requirements. I would think a lot of pc users would never buy separate bits(eg my dad, he games quite a lot but knows nothing about the insides of a PC)
Anfield 16th March 2017, 18:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
Yes it is smart to sell slightly broken chips at a cheaper price, no it is not smart to break big expensive chips so you can sell them at bargain prices?

The problem with that is that diminishing returns will bleed your bank account dry faster than a slot machine if you want to squeeze the last bit out of yields, in other words, having Cpus where only some of the cores work is an inevitability.
rollo 16th March 2017, 19:05 Quote
AMD cannot afford to do it any other way, that's the reality of the situation.

I do wonder how 2+2 will perform in real world scenarios.
Harlequin 16th March 2017, 19:37 Quote
Remember the X4 960T? the T is the giveaway - it was the hex core Thuban, but 2 core locked off for a price sensitive market.
Locknload 16th March 2017, 21:14 Quote
That is what i enjoy about Gareth's rebukes, you can ALWAYS give both barrels if you know what your talking about and do your research.

Can you send my tenner via Paypal, Mr Halfacree. Thanks.

Brown_nose69@aol.com

:)
Gareth Halfacree 16th March 2017, 21:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Locknload
That is what i enjoy about Gareth's rebukes, you can ALWAYS give both barrels if you know what your talking about and do your research.
I'm ace, me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Locknload

Can you send my tenner via Paypal, Mr Halfacree. Thanks.
Brown_nose69@aol.com
:)
Dude, c'mon, via PM, man. Psh. Some shill you turned out to be!
Vault-Tec 16th March 2017, 22:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlequin
Remember the X4 960T? the T is the giveaway - it was the hex core Thuban, but 2 core locked off for a price sensitive market.

There was a T that was given to some one like HP for pre built rigs. It too was a quad core that unlocked to a hex.

AMD do this all of the time. Unlike Intel though they leave the Easter eggs in, rather than cutting/locking them out completely.

Cheaper lower core/thread CPUs sell in higher numbers. That's why they can afford to hide bits of it and sell it. It's all turn and burn. They pay per wafer, so I guess as long as they make a healthy profit on each wafer it doesn't matter which method they've used.
Spraduke 17th March 2017, 11:13 Quote
As 'one of those guys' still using my Week 1 purchased Sandybridge i5-2500k, I am interested to see how the hexcore pieces pan out.

Whilst I don't think my current computer experience is poor (I use it rarely due to family/work and when I do only for CSGO). I am conscious of becoming quite behind on the ancillary aspects such as NVME, UEFI, full USB3 support (any other important once I've missed? pcie version?).

I therefore have an itch for an upgrade but the price of the skylake processors seems daft (I think I paid ~£200 for my i5-2500k), plus I have a soft spot for AMD as my first self build was an Athlon 1900xp.
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