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Seagate begins 8TB hard drive sales

Seagate begins 8TB hard drive sales

Seagate's new 8TB drive is now shipping to selected customers, with the company promising general availability in the coming months.

Seagate has begun shipping final production versions of its 8TB mechanical hard drives to select customers, claiming the drives will be readily available for all in the next quarter.

Part of the company's high-capacity drive roadmap first unveiled in May this year, the 8TB drives have previously only shipped as pre-production prototypes to partners in the company's Kinetic storage platform programme. During the company's earnings call earlier this year, chief executive Steve Luczo claimed that 'initial customer feedback [on the drives] has been very positive,' indicating that there was little to do other than begin mass production for end-users to get their hands on the drives.

Now, Seagate has done exactly that, beginning with small quantity availability of final production models for selected customers - becoming the first storage company to hit 8TB in a single standard-size 3.5" chassis. 'As our world becomes more mobile, the number of devices we use to create and consume data is driving an explosive growth in unstructured data. This places increased pressure on cloud builders to look for innovative ways to build cost-effective, high capacity storage for both private and cloud-based data centres,' claimed Scott Horn, vice president of marketing at the company. 'Seagate is poised to address this challenge by offering the world’s first 8TB HDD, a ground-breaking new solution for meeting the increased capacities needed to support the demand for high capacity storage in a world bursting with digital creation, consumption and long-term storage.'

What Seagate has yet to share is the price, but with the initial 8TB models being targeted at enterprise use - although featuring a consumer-grade SATA 6Gb/s interface, for some reason - the drives will sit at the very top end of the storage market when they fully launch in the coming months.

19 Comments

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zimano 27th August 2014, 15:37 Quote
I got bored of waiting, caved in and got 4 x 4TB drives a few months back. These 8TB drives look like they'll be out of reach of joe public for a while yet so dont feel too bad about these. Kind of wished I'd held off a little bit to get the 6TB Western Digital drives around the £200 mark though but I'd been waiting for years and years for something larger than 4TB.
runadumb 27th August 2014, 18:00 Quote
Must say I'm looking forward to getting one. Not paying more than £250 though, so as long as that takes.
YEHBABY 27th August 2014, 18:17 Quote
I just hope that these larger hard drives eventually force down the 4TB drives below the £100 mark. That would be the new sweet spot.
jrs77 27th August 2014, 18:40 Quote
The bigger the drives get, the more junk people collect and the more data they loose on disk-error.

I try to keep my data-collection as small as possible, and my critical data is only some 700 GB (workfiles and music-collection) atm, so 1TB drives are still plenty enough for my current needs.

Thes huge files are good for data-centers maybe, but for normal people 4 GB should be the absolute maximum someone needs.
Hell... my sister can store all her data on a single 256GB SSD in her MBA without running out of disk-space :p
GeorgeStorm 27th August 2014, 19:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
The bigger the drives get, the more junk people collect and the more data they loose on disk-error.

I try to keep my data-collection as small as possible, and my critical data is only some 700 GB (workfiles and music-collection) atm, so 1TB drives are still plenty enough for my current needs.

Thes huge files are good for data-centers maybe, but for normal people 4 GB should be the absolute maximum someone needs.
Hell... my sister can store all her data on a single 256GB SSD in her MBA without running out of disk-space :p

But if you add video to the music, then having more space is quickly needed.
Anfield 27th August 2014, 20:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
The bigger the drives get, the more junk people collect and the more data they loose on disk-error.

Most of my data is just my steam library anyway as I can't be bothered to wait for a download and install.

Also ripping all your cds / dvds / blu rays in a loss less format due to being too lazy to look for discs every time eats storage space for breakfast.

Plus a lot of the increased storage needs is also just due to files getting bigger, current nvidia gpu driver is 213MB, remember when they used to fit on a 1.44MB floppy?
boiled_elephant 27th August 2014, 22:30 Quote
I rip my DVDs and Blu-Rays for archiving and fast access, because I hate physical media. My current media PC is rocking about 8TB mirrored storage space all told, but it's all in 1 and 2TB drives and it makes a hell of a noise.

As soon as there's an 8TB WD Red drive, my life will be a lot easier (and quieter).
goldstar0011 27th August 2014, 22:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77


Thes huge files are good for data-centers maybe, but for normal people 4 GB should be the absolute maximum someone needs.

My wedding DVD takes up 4.7gb alone, am I not normal?


Although I would also be concerned about putting all my eggs in 1 basket, I've lost data on a HDD and spent over a week recovering it slowly with about 10% loss.

Looking forward to other drives coming down though
jrs77 28th August 2014, 02:13 Quote
But that's exactly what I'm talking about.

How often do you watch those movies anyways? The couple of movies I consider worth it to store them I can aswell buy as a BluRay and store these 20 or 30 discs with ease in the drawer beneath the TV-set.

Same goes for images... I don't keep every image I take, but I sort through them and discard/delete all images that aren't 100% what I want.

And ripping music in lossless format? What for? I have all my music on original CDs and only rip them into MP3 so I can carry my music-library on a MP3-player where I don't need lossless music to begin with.
If I want to sit down in the livingroom and enjoy a lossless track, then I can aswell throw a CD into the player.
Lossless is a total waste of efforts for listening music in the background while working, doing sports in the gym, running through the city, etc.

Seriously people, quality is way more important then quantity, and if you live by that rule then life gets alot easier and less messy.

Another good thing that comes with less data is that you can get rid of your 3.5" drives and only use 2.5" SSD/HDDs. I only have a SSD for OS and applications and then a 1TB 2.5" HDD for storage. For backup I use an external 2TB USB-drive and that's it.
runadumb 28th August 2014, 03:03 Quote
We get it jrs77, you don't need this storage. You have your way of doing things and that's fine. Me, I have the means and the will to fill a 8TB with things I want (mostly emulation) very easily. I already run a 2x4TB NAS so a single 8TB drive I could dump all that stuff onto inside my HTPC would be very welcome.

I own hundreds of CD's and they just sit in a box in the attic. I have zero interest in storing a 500+ boxes of cd's, DVD's, BR's in my living space whenever I can store it all on a single 3.5inch drive. Each to their own.
BLC 28th August 2014, 08:19 Quote
CD-R/DVD-R discs only have an expected shelf life of 5-10 years before they're recorded, and I can't imagine the recording process will lengthen the life expectancy of a DVD-R (source https://chnm.gmu.edu/digitalhistory/links/cached/preserving/8_1a_cdcare.htm). Similar poor longevity has also been seen in recordable blu-ray media (see here http://goughlui.com/?p=4914).

Recordable optical media is not a reliable long-term storage or backup strategy for data that you really don't want to lose, such as goldstar0011's wedding video. Not unless you want the huge effort of re-recording your discs every few years (and even if you did this you'd still need the hard drive space to back up the data on those discs before you recorded it to new discs). The most reliable and cost effective way of storing data like that is magnetic hard drives and a robust backup solution (I emphasize robust because if you really want a backup to be reliable then it should preferably be a an off-site backup). Unless of course you want to go down the magnetic tape cold-storage road, but that tends to get expensive for private individuals and while the data density & cost per GB/TB may be higher than hard drives the chances are that you'll spend a lot of money on specialised equipment that has only one purpose. Hard drives are versatile, a tape reader/writer isn't.

Just because you can live on 4GB jrs77 - and I strongly challenge the assertion that 4GB is indeed enough - it doesn't mean that everyone can. We can now fit 128GB of solid-state storage in a device that's no bigger than my thumbnail - why shouldn't I take advantage of that? Also, you say the same thing every time a hard-drive/storage news article is posted; give up, we're not listening any more.
Corky42 28th August 2014, 08:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldstar0011
My wedding DVD takes up 4.7gb alone, am I not normal?

No one is normal. My mommie always told me i was special, although I'm not sure she meant it in a nice way :D ;)
YEHBABY 28th August 2014, 08:56 Quote
Sorry JRS but I don't have 20 or so dvds, I have over 500 and trying to store/ look through is a pain. I may only watch ocassionally but its much nicer to look through my media library through plex and select genre etc.
jrs77 28th August 2014, 10:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by YEHBABY
Sorry JRS but I don't have 20 or so dvds, I have over 500 and trying to store/ look through is a pain. I may only watch ocassionally but its much nicer to look through my media library through plex and select genre etc.

Exactly what I'm talking about...

... over 500 DVDs :facepalm:
Mister_Tad 28th August 2014, 11:08 Quote
Look, we're please you've achieved a zen-like tranquillity in your approach to data management, but there are plenty of valid reasons to need lots of storage at home, whether it's all put to good use or mindless hoarding, what's it to you?

At any rate, the story here isn't really about the disk capacity, it's more along the lines of "5PB in a rack", as I don't think these drives will be hitting consumer channels for quite some time (in spite of the odd choice of a SATA interface)
BLC 28th August 2014, 17:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister_Tad
At any rate, the story here isn't really about the disk capacity, it's more along the lines of "5PB in a rack", as I don't think these drives will be hitting consumer channels for quite some time (in spite of the odd choice of a SATA interface)

....That's 625 8TB hard drives in a rack. THINK OF THE NOISE!
jinq-sea 28th August 2014, 17:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
Exactly what I'm talking about...

... over 500 DVDs :facepalm:

You're doing well at being offensive today! ;) I for one am very happy with my collection of 500+ DVDs. I like movies. I don't much care for piracy, and streaming, IMHO, has poor audio in general.

You do things your way, and don't pontificate your views on others, and we'll all happily co-exist? Deal?
Anfield 28th August 2014, 20:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister_Tad
At any rate, the story here isn't really about the disk capacity, it's more along the lines of "5PB in a rack", as I don't think these drives will be hitting consumer channels for quite some time (in spite of the odd choice of a SATA interface)

I happily pay the premium for enterprise harddisks.

On a list of smells you never forget a harddisk going up in smoke comes second only to a decaying corpse.

Not even to mention the mental anguish when you see smoke coming out of a pc case and thats before we even get to the more common smoke free failures that are far too common in consumer drives.
LennyRhys 28th August 2014, 22:27 Quote
Lol jrs you making friends here :D

I understand what you're saying and in principle there's nothing wrong with it, as long as that's your own stance that you apply to yourself (and not to others). I'm in a similar position to you - I have 320GB boot drive and 2TB storage, and that's all I've needed for the past 3-4 years.

CDs? DVDs? What are they? Pretty much any film my wife and I watch is on the laptop via HDMI, downloaded content or something streamed through our Virgin box. People (like myself) who are movie buffs are going to have a movie collection, and if it's 10GB or so for a blu-ray movie, then 1TB isn't going to get you very far... there are many more than 100 good films out there!
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