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SoSecure smartphone-controlled SSD hits Kickstarter

SoSecure smartphone-controlled SSD hits Kickstarter

The SoSecure SSD features an integrated battery, Bluetooth LE connectivity and a security processor that lets the user control the drive via a smartphone or tablet.

Startup SoSecure has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for what it claims is the world's first high-security solid-state drive to feature smartphone control and management.

Based around a traditional, if slightly thick, 2.5" form factor, the SoSecure includes the expected SATA interface at one end; the other, meanwhile, includes a micro-USB 3.0 port for mobile use. Internally is where things get really clever: the drive also includes a security processor and Bluetooth LE connectivity, powered by a rechargeable battery, which communicates with a smartphone application bundled with each drive.

Using the smartphone app, users can monitor the status of the drive, lock and unlock the drive, change the encryption keys for the in-built AES256 cryptography engine, and even remotely wipe the drive using an instant security erase functionality. The Bluetooth connection also allows for proximity-based settings, warning if the drive is being moved or automatically locking if it moves out of range of the smartphone. An optional dock allows two drives to be used in a backup configuration the company callls Zero-Touch Backup.

'Not only have we created a high-performance solid-state disk drive that is perfect for corporate and private use, we’ve also put the perfect 21st century twist on the technology by making it smartphone-compatible,' crowed SoSecure founder James Little of his company's creation. 'From the Zero-Touch Backup facility to a motion detection sensor so you can tell if your drive has been moved, we’ve given the drive everything it could possibly need to become the most sought-after security and storage gadgets on the market.'

The company plans to launch the devices at retail priced at £228 for a 64GB version in aluminium, plastic or oak finishes, or £262 for a carbon fibre version, with 128GB models costing £288 and £322 respectively. As an incentive for Kickstarter backers, early bird rewards see the 64GB model going for £187 with planned October shipping.

Full details are available on the company's Kickstarter page.

3 Comments

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edzieba 11th June 2014, 12:36 Quote
Bluetooth access directly to the crypto IC? That's sort of like having a 'smart' bank vault door, which makes it easy to change the encryption keys pin combination by reaching through this handy window on the side...
Gareth Halfacree 11th June 2014, 13:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by edzieba
Bluetooth access directly to the crypto IC? That's sort of like having a 'smart' bank vault door, which makes it easy to change the encryption keys pin combination by reaching through this handy window on the side...
Yes, if changing the encryption keys pin combination irrevocably destroyed the contents of the bank vault. 'Cos that's what changing the encryption key (note: not password/passphrase/PIN) would do to an encrypted hard drive: render the contents of the drive, encrypted with the old key, completely unreadable.
IvanIvanovich 11th June 2014, 18:29 Quote
Seems unnecessarily complex to me. If they would have used dram instead of nand... all that would be needed was a remote battery off command... goodbye data. Additionally it may have had a side effect of being quite a lot faster in operation.
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