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Nvidia launches GeForce GT 740 family

Nvidia launches GeForce GT 740 family

The GeForce GT 740 is priced below £80 for most models, offers memory choices from 1GB to 4GB and comes with the vague promise of a four-fold performance boost over integrated graphics.

Nvidia has officially launched the GeForce GT 740 low-end graphics card, offering game-capable performance at a sub-£80 price point with a variety of board partners getting in on the act.

Sitting at the very opposite end of the market from the recently-launched GeForce GTX Titan Z, the GeForce GT 740 offers a GK107 Kepler graphics processor with 384 CUDA cores running at a base clock of 993MHz. Depending on board partner and model chosen, GDDR5 or DDR3 memory is available: the latter offers 28.8GB/s bandwidth on a 1.8Gb/s memory clock, while the former boasts 80GB/s of bandwidth on a 5GB/s memory clock. Both use a 128-bit memory bus.

Although short in length, barely protruding beyond the PCI Express slot into which they sit, the boards on offer at present are largely dual-slot designs with the occasional single-slot variant on show. Nvidia's reference design features a central cooler over the GPU which leaves the remainder of the board bare, although most board partners have instead opted for a shrouded design to show off their branding and improve cooling performance.

Nvidia is positioning the cards as an upgrade from integrated graphics, claiming a rather vague four-fold increase in gaming performance yet somehow failing to detail exactly which integrated graphics solution is being used for comparison. Performance claims aside, the most interesting aspect of the launch is the variability: GT 740 cards are available in models ranging from an entry-level 1GB version right up to a relatively high-end 4GB GDDR5 model with factory overclock.

Prices vary considerably depending on manufacturer, specification and retailer: at present, the cheapest we've found is a 1GB GDDR5 model from Gainward at Scan for £60.10 including VAT. Pricing for the 4GB editions has not yet been confirmed.

13 Comments

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Guinevere 30th May 2014, 12:14 Quote
Awwwwe I loves likkle cute gwaphics cards.
Shirty 30th May 2014, 12:17 Quote
I'm sure I'm missing something here, but what possible use could a card like this have for a 4GB framebuffer?
Impatience 30th May 2014, 12:57 Quote
Maybe you wanted extreme next-gen textures @720p? :) Or more likely, 4K movies? (Pretty sure it's not THAT taxing on a GPU..) But what I want to know is.. What's this based on? Because i'm pretty sure it's not Maxwell!
Corky42 30th May 2014, 13:03 Quote
AFAIK it's based on Kepler.
Would have liked to see some partners come out with passive and single slot solutions.
debs3759 30th May 2014, 13:17 Quote
It uses a GK107. It is a rebranded GTX 650 with lower GPU clock speed.
Hustler 30th May 2014, 14:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirty
I'm sure I'm missing something here, but what possible use could a card like this have for a 4GB framebuffer?

For the user none, but for the card manufacturer it's a great marketing headliner.

Even so, this is roughly equal in power to my old Radeon 4870 (but with the nice DX11 feature set), so would be more than powerful enough to play just about anything at 1080p & minimum 2AA from the Xbox 360 and PS3 era of gaming at 40-60fps.

Put inside a small HTPC, it would make a cracking little gaming box.
Gareth Halfacree 30th May 2014, 14:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impatience
But what I want to know is.. What's this based on? Because i'm pretty sure it's not Maxwell!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
AFAIK it's based on Kepler.
Would have liked to see some partners come out with passive and single slot solutions.
C'mon, guys...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Article
Sitting at the very opposite end of the market from the recently-launched GeForce GTX Titan Z, the GeForce GT 740 offers a GK107 Kepler graphics processor with 384 CUDA cores running at a base clock of 993MHz.
[...]
Although short in length, barely protruding beyond the PCI Express slot into which they sit, the boards on offer at present are largely dual-slot designs with the occasional single-slot variant on show.
:p ;)
Corky42 30th May 2014, 14:29 Quote
That's what happens when i read an article when it was posted, then answer in the forums hours later, without bothering to re-read it
Impatience 30th May 2014, 14:40 Quote
I completely missed that bit.. Read all of the article, but missed the "GK107 Kepler" bit. :(
Star*Dagger 31st May 2014, 09:03 Quote
Garbage cards, pure waste of money.
SchizoFrog 31st May 2014, 14:04 Quote
I would imagine that these are about the same or slightly higher than the higher end AMD APUs... Not sure I see much of a point for these or a real situation where someone would buy them.
debs3759 1st June 2014, 01:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Garbage cards, pure waste of money.

Card makers, those who make enough money to be able to say they know the market, disagree with you. For starters, EVGA have a total of 9 GT 740 models available. If there was no market for entry level cards they wouldn't provide so many options.
Anfield 1st June 2014, 02:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by debs3759
Card makers, those who make enough money to be able to say they know the market, disagree with you. For starters, EVGA have a total of 9 GT 740 models available. If there was no market for entry level cards they wouldn't provide so many options.

It is only the single biggest market there is for GPUs, those cards will end up in a large number of pre built budget PCs. Those cheap PCs sell in far higher numbers than any PC anyone on bit-tech would be interested in ever will.

That doesn't make them good cards for the Consumer by any stretch of the imagination though, just for the Manufacturers.
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