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Scythe unveils Mugen MAX, low-profile Kodati

Scythe unveils Mugen MAX, low-profile Kodati

The Scythe Kodati, pictured, measures just 34mm high while the Mugen MAX boasts a 140mm fan in a tower layout.

Japanese cooling specialist Scythe has announced a pair of new CPU heatsinks, the beefy Mugen MAX and the low-profile Kodati, ahead of their official launches next month.

First, the Mugen MAX: designed as a follow-up to the 2009 Mugen 2, the Mugen MAX is a tower-type heatsink featuring a whopping 140mm fan to keep it cool. The heatsink connects to the CPU via a nickel-plated copper coldplate, into which six 6mm heatpipes run before shedding their thermal load into an all-aluminium fin stack. These fins, the company explains, feature jagged edges and non-planar shapes in order to maximise turbulence - which, in turn, is claimed to enhance heat dissipation.

The Mugen MAX comes complete with a Scythe Falcon 140mm pulse-width modulation (PWM) fan, adjustable between 500 and 1,300RPM for claimed totals of 37.37 and 97.18 cubic feet per minute (CFM) of airflow at between 13 to 30.7dBA. With an overall size of 145mm x 110mm x 161mm and an 870g weight, it's clear the Mugen MAX is a cooler for the larger case owner only.

For the more compact chassis, there's the Kodati. Described by the company as an ultra-low-profile cooler, the Kodati uses a C-shape layout of its twin 6mm copper heatpipes to transfer the heat from the nickel-plated copper coldplate to an ultra-slim aluminium fin stack. Interestingly, the design sees the fan placed below the stack rather than on top, sandwiched between the coldplate and the fins, where it pulls air up and blows it through the fins. The result is a cooler measuring just 34mm in height, with a 82.5mm x 95mm overall footprint.

The Kodati won't be suitable for high-TDP chips, mind: the bundled 80mm fan spins between 800 and 3,300RPM, but even at its maximum speed manages just 24.8 cubic feet per minute of airflow at a claimed 32.5dBA volume. For the space-limited, however, it could be a worthwhile option for cooling lower-power processors.

UK pricing is expected to be confirmed closer to both heatsinks' June launch date.

2 Comments

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SchizoFrog 29th May 2014, 13:33 Quote
I wonder if the Kodati would make jrs77 happy?
GuilleAcoustic 29th May 2014, 14:06 Quote
That is perfect for "T" (35 - 45W TDP) variant of the intel Core family (e.g. i7-4785T : http://ark.intel.com/fr/products/80814/Intel-Core-i7-4785T-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-3_20-GHz)
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