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Microsoft Surface Pro 3 specs, prices leak

Microsoft Surface Pro 3 specs, prices leak

Microsoft's Surface Pro 3 plans have been leaked ahead of the company's press conference tomorrow, suggesting a new Surface Pro 3 model with a range of processor choices.

Specifications and pricing for Microsoft's Surface Pro 3 Windows-based tablets have leaked ahead of its expected unveiling at a press conference tomorrow, seemingly confirming the company's plans to extend the Surface family considerably.

Available in ARM-based Windows RT variants dubbed Surface - originally Surface RT - and more powerful Intel models running a full-fat Windows 8 install called Surface Pro, Microsoft's latest attempt at breaking into the tablet market hasn't been an unalloyed success. The company took a near-$1 billion write-down for unsold stock of the original Surface RT family, and while sales picked up following a major price cut they never reached the levels for which the company was hoping. The successor tablets showed that the company had listened to criticism, and initial indications were that sales were good. Sadly, its most recent earnings call revealed a nose-dive in sales for the Surface line - leaving some to wonder if Microsoft was going to abandon the effort altogether.

The answer, it would appear, is no. The company has scheduled a press conference for tomorrow at which it is expected to unveil third-generation Surface and Surface Pro tablets - and a leak has unveiled specifications for the latter. According to an unnamed source speaking to WPCentral on the matter, the new Surface Pro 3 will include a larger display behind which the buyer will be given the choice of an Intel Core i3 processor with 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage, a Core i5 processor with 4GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, a Core i5 processor with 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage, a Core i7 processor with 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage or a Core i7 processor with 8GB of RAM and 512GB of storage.

Pricing for the new models begins, the site's source claims, at $799 for the entry-level Core i3 and rises to $999 for the 128GB i5. Those looking for 256GB of storage will be asked to pay $1,299 for the i5 or $1,549 for the i7, while the range-topping 512GB model hits $1,949. The range of processor types and wide pricing is a change for the Surface family, and an indication perhaps that the one-size-fits-all approach of most tablet manufacturers is being brought into question.

Microsoft, naturally, has neither confirmed nor denied the leak, nor comments from the same source that the design of the Surface Pro 3 includes a smaller bezel alongside a larger screen - which means no compatibility with existing Surface Covers - and the shifting of the Windows button to the vertical side. With the press conference due to take place tomorrow night, however, fans shouldn't have long to wait to see what Microsoft has up its sleeve.

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Corky42 19th May 2014, 10:43 Quote
Quote:
The range of processor types and wide pricing is a change for the Surface family, and an indication perhaps that the one-size-fits-all approach of most tablet manufacturers is being brought into question.

So on the price and hardware side of things Microsoft questions the one-size-fits-all approach, but when it comes to the OS it would seem they don't follow the same mantra.
Gareth Halfacree 19th May 2014, 10:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
So on the price and hardware side of things Microsoft questions the one-size-fits-all approach, but when it comes to the OS it would seem they don't follow the same mantra.
One size fits all? Hardly. There's Windows 8.1, Windows 8.1 Pro, Windows 8.1 Enterprise. In emerging markets there's Windows 8.1 Single Language. Then there's Windows 8.1 N, Windows 8.1 Pro N and Windows 8.1 Enterprise N for Europe. All of these are further available in 32-bit or 64-bit variants. That's 14 versions so far. Then there's Windows 8.1 RT, for 15.

Next, of course, you get the specialist variants. Let's start with Windows Server 2012 Foundation, Windows Server 2012 Essentials, Windows Server 2012 Standard and Windows Server 2012 Datacentre. At least they're all 64-bit only, so at least there's only four to add. That's us up to 19 variants of Windows 8(.1) thus far. Then there's Windows Embedded 8 Industry Standard, Windows Embedded 8 Industry Pro, Windows Embedded 8 Industry Enterprise and Windows Embedded 8 Hand-Held.

Then I guess if we're counting the latter we should really count Windows Phone 8.1 too - although let's be kind and look from a retail perspective, count it as a single SKU rather than one SKU per SoC platform. That's now, what, 24 variants of Windows 8(.1)? Even before we consider the different SKUs presented by different methods of licensing: Retail Edition, Upgrade Edition, Volume Licensing, OEM Licensing, System Builder Licensing...
loftie 19th May 2014, 11:08 Quote
"Full fat Windows 8", dislike.
Corky42 19th May 2014, 11:09 Quote
Well that's what Microsoft keep telling people, Windows 8: One OS to Rule Them All.
ChaosDefinesOrder 19th May 2014, 14:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Well that's what Microsoft keep telling people, Windows 8: One OS to Rule Them All.

...and in the Blue Screen bind them
azazel1024 19th May 2014, 14:38 Quote
It would be nice if they had a $599 version with 4GB and 64GB of storage and a z3770 or z3775 (I think that is the new top of the line bay trail-t coming out shortly) in it below the i3 version.
Nexxo 19th May 2014, 19:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Well that's what Microsoft keep telling people, Windows 8: One OS to Rule Them All.

The idea is that the GUI is recognisably similar. There are also universal apps (work on Windows Phone, RT and x86) and of course cloud syncing.

Oh, and:
Quote:
Microsoft, naturally, has neither confirmed nor denied the leak, nor comments from the same source that the design of the Surface Pro 3 includes a smaller bezel alongside a larger screen - which means no compatibility with existing Surface Covers - and the shifting of the Windows button to the vertical side.

Surely if the bezel is smaller alongside a larger screen, the overall dimensions of the device should remain the same and the existing Covers will fit? Seems to make sense to me.

In any case, this may mean cheap second-hand Surface Pro 2's hitting the market. My body is ready. :D
Corky42 19th May 2014, 20:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
The idea is that the GUI is recognisably similar. There are also universal apps (work on Windows Phone, RT and x86) and of course cloud syncing.

Is that why there are two of them.

Universal apps are great in principal. But what happens if someone doesn't want their new app to switch them in and out of the modern UI, or if the rumored surface mini comes out with a 7-8 inch screen and i want my app to run on a 4K screen, or if as a developer i want to charge more or less on one device like on phones versus PCs

And I'm not to sure the cloud is the best place to store personal data, what with the amount of security and privacy issues or possible downtime, such as that experienced recently by Adobe leaving people with no access to important work for 24h.
Jim 19th May 2014, 20:39 Quote
If there's a healthy price drop on the Surface 2 RT, I might be tempted to grab one of those - can't see that they'll offer any spec improvements to tempt me with the third generation.
Nexxo 19th May 2014, 20:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Is that why there are two of them.
Yup. Similar ≠ identical.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Universal apps are great in principal. But what happens if someone doesn't want their new app to switch them in and out of the modern UI, or if the rumored surface mini comes out with a 7-8 inch screen and i want my app to run on a 4K screen, or if as a developer i want to charge more or less on one device like on phones versus PCs
I guess the same that happens with iOS apps running on iPhone and iPad: it recognises the available resolution/hardware and adapts. Developers charge a single price across platforms. And if people don't want a Modern app to switch them in and out of Modern, don't download a Modern app.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
And I'm not to sure the cloud is the best place to store personal data, what with the amount of security and privacy issues or possible downtime, such as that experienced recently by Adobe leaving people with no access to important work for 24h.

Yeah, that's why you also keep local backups. Which is what OneDrive conveniently does if you tell it to.

Some years ago there was this NHS executive who lost a memory stick with patient identifiable information on it. Did the NHS get rid of all memory sticks? No. It just got encrypted ones and told people not to use them for patient identifiable information (duh!). There always be idiots, but that's not technology's fault.
jrs77 20th May 2014, 01:38 Quote
For $999 I'd simply buy a 13" MBA instead.
Gareth Halfacree 20th May 2014, 07:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Surely if the bezel is smaller alongside a larger screen, the overall dimensions of the device should remain the same and the existing Covers will fit? Seems to make sense to me.
From what I've heard, the Surface Pro 3 will be 12" - and there ain't enough bezel on the Surface Pro 2 to keep overall dimensions the same, even if the Pro 3 was edge-to-edge.
Corky42 20th May 2014, 08:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Yup. Similar ≠ identical.
Stop using fancy symbols, it took me blooming ages to find out what ≠ meant :)

But the desktop GUI is nothing like the Modern GUI, a desktop user won't even have a similar experience to a phone or tablet user. Giving people two GUI's in one OS doesn't make for a similar experience, it just makes people play guessing games as to what GUI a certain device, or application is going to use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
I guess the same that happens with iOS apps running on iPhone and iPad: it recognises the available resolution/hardware and adapts. Developers charge a single price across platforms. And if people don't want a Modern app to switch them in and out of Modern, don't download a Modern app.
Isn't not downloading the Modern app just going to break the similar experience Microsoft is attempting to create with their One OS to Rule Them All idea.
iOS developers are already experiencing problems with having to include different assets in universal apps so they can run on different displays and devices, I'm not sure people are going to be to happy with having to download a 50Mb application on their phone if a large portion of that isn't even needed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Yeah, that's why you also keep local backups. Which is what OneDrive conveniently does if you tell it to.

Some years ago there was this NHS executive who lost a memory stick with patient identifiable information on it. Did the NHS get rid of all memory sticks? No. It just got encrypted ones and told people not to use them for patient identifiable information (duh!). There always be idiots, but that's not technology's fault.

No it isn't technology's fault, but it was the fault of whom ever decided to use un-encrypted patient identifiable information on a memory stick when they were first introduced.
The fact that nothing untoward happened and the situation could be improved is fortunate, the NHS had the option of changing to encrypted memory sticks, it had the option to prevent people from storing patient identifiable information on them.

Even though we have the option ATM to tell OneDrive to keep local backups how many people just except the default, I'm assuming local backups are not the default. How long before we are in a situation such as people who have to use Adobe products, forced into using the cloud.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 09:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
But the desktop GUI is nothing like the Modern GUI, a desktop user won't even have a similar experience to a phone or tablet user. Giving people two GUI's in one OS doesn't make for a similar experience, it just makes people play guessing games as to what GUI a certain device, or application is going to use.
I think most of the time it's pretty obvious, to be honest. Stuff downloaded from Windows Store is Metro. Stuff downloaded old skool through the browser usually is not. As long as it is well-suited to the function and operation of the app, what does it matter what type GUI it has?

On my Surface, the two GUI work pretty well BTW. Metro in tablet mode; desktop when I perch it on the desk as a laptop.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Isn't not downloading the Modern app just going to break the similar experience Microsoft is attempting to create with their One OS to Rule Them All idea.
iOS developers are already experiencing problems with having to include different assets in universal apps so they can run on different displays and devices, I'm not sure people are going to be to happy with having to download a 50Mb application on their phone if a large portion of that isn't even needed.
Arguably Android developers have an even bigger headache. Yet they all seem to manage. And remember how your browser somehow seems to know what OS you are running and download the correct version of an application? App stores can do the same thing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
No it isn't technology's fault, but it was the fault of whom ever decided to use un-encrypted patient identifiable information on a memory stick when they were first introduced. The fact that nothing untoward happened and the situation could be improved is fortunate, the NHS had the option of changing to encrypted memory sticks, it had the option to prevent people from storing patient identifiable information on them.

Even though we have the option ATM to tell OneDrive to keep local backups how many people just except the default, I'm assuming local backups are not the default. How long before we are in a situation such as people who have to use Adobe products, forced into using the cloud.

I'm sorry, but that is the end user's problem --know the software you are using. Especially if you do so for a living, Adobe user. It's like arguing against cars because some people are too dumb to recognise that occasionally you have to check the oil and tire pressure. I don't know a professional lorry driver who doesn't have an intimate knowledge of their lorry. I don't know a (decent) chef who doesn't know the food and tools he cooks with. The research psychologists I work with can operate the SPSS statistical package blindfolded (there's this girl who is mesmerising to watch. She operates SPSS so fast that the GUI turns into a blur).
Corky42 20th May 2014, 10:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
I think most of the time it's pretty obvious, to be honest. Stuff downloaded from Windows Store is Metro. Stuff downloaded old skool through the browser usually is not. As long as it is well-suited to the function and operation of the app, what does it matter what type GUI it has?
If users are having to choose between two different GUI's it does nothing to further the One OS to Rule Them All idea, if anything it just splits it into to halves.
Maybe at some point Microsoft may merge those two halves into one GUI, but the rumors saying they are bringing back a start menu that will show live tiles isn't the right direction (imho).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Arguably Android developers have an even bigger headache. Yet they all seem to manage. And remember how your browser somehow seems to know what OS you are running and download the correct version of an application? App stores can do the same thing.
True, but detecting what OS someone is running and downloading the correct version isn't a universal application (imho).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
I'm sorry, but that is the end user's problem --know the software you are using. Especially if you do so for a living, Adobe user. It's like arguing against cars because some people are too dumb to recognise that occasionally you have to check the oil and tire pressure. I don't know a professional lorry driver who doesn't have an intimate knowledge of their lorry. I don't know a (decent) chef who doesn't know the food and tools he cooks with. The research psychologists I work with can operate the SPSS statistical package blindfolded (there's this girl who is mesmerising to watch. She operates SPSS so fast that the GUI turns into a blur).

In part it's an end user problem. Users can choose to enable certain options or use different products, but what should they do when those options are taken away from them.

In a perfect world everyone using a computer would be a professional computer operator, sadly that is not the case. I would guess the majority of people using computers wouldn't have a clue how to change settings, or even what does or doesn't happen without their knowledge or say so.

Re the checking of oil level in cars, 75% of drivers don't know how to do that.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 10:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
If users are having to choose between two different GUI's it does nothing to further the One OS to Rule Them All idea, if anything it just splits it into to halves.
Maybe at some point Microsoft may merge those two halves into one GUI, but the rumors saying they are bringing back a start menu that will show live tiles isn't the right direction (imho).
I think that you are confusing OS with GUI. And Microsoft will work it out. It has done so before.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
True, but detecting what OS someone is running and downloading the correct version isn't a universal application (imho).
Doesn't have to be. It just has to be embedded in the relevant Store and the browser. As it already is.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
In part it's an end user problem. Users can choose to enable certain options or use different products, but what should they do when those options are taken away from them.
That is a totally different debate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
In a perfect world everyone using a computer would be a professional computer operator, sadly that is not the case. I would guess the majority of people using computers wouldn't have a clue how to change settings, or even what does or doesn't happen without their knowledge or say so.

Re the checking of oil level in cars, 75% of drivers don't know how to do that.

Cars: designed by computer, built by robots and driven by idiots. :p Again, it is not a design flaw of the car that its driver is a complacent moron. It's not the computer's fault if a user chooses not to learn the basics of its operation.
Corky42 20th May 2014, 11:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
I think that you are confusing OS with GUI. And Microsoft will work it out. It has done so before.
Maybe i am, but you started it ;) when you said..."The idea is that the GUI is recognisably similar." And they are not in there current form.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Doesn't have to be. It just has to be embedded in the relevant Store and the browser. As it already is.
So not the universal application, or One OS to Rule Them All, but different GUI's, different applications, different way of doing things, etc, etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
That is a totally different debate.
Isn't it one of the many reasons why the cloud is a bad idea.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Cars: designed by computer, built by robots and driven by idiots. :p Again, it is not a design flaw of the car that its driver is a complacent moron. It's not the computer's fault if a user chooses not to learn the basics of its operation.
But it is a design flaw if the default option is to not warn the driver of low oil levels, or to have no indication of potential problems. Just like it's a design flaw for Adobe products to stop working if they can't authenticate with the servers.
rollo 20th May 2014, 11:50 Quote
Microsoft has had little problems getting its OS out there due to the complete lack of competition in the desktop laptop area. Mac OSX is still sub 10%.

Does not mean each OS they have made has been awesome. Windows ME windows vista and windows 8 all had flaws some still have them.

GUI is totally different to OS enough the differences between windows 98 and 7 are pretty small if you disable aero.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 12:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Maybe i am, but you started it ;) when you said..."The idea is that the GUI is recognisably similar." And they are not in there current form.
Fair dos. There are two issues here: do all the OS's have shared code so the same apps can run on all of them, and do the GUI have recognisable elements. Microsoft is working towards that on both front, but given that historically different teams worked on different platforms, it is not surprising that convergence will take a while. Hardware has also had some catching up to do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
So not the universal application, or One OS to Rule Them All, but different GUI's, different applications, different way of doing things, etc, etc.
No. The code is the same; the graphic resources may come in different versions for different size screens, but that should be rare as many graphic elements are dynamically resizable --especially in Metro.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Isn't it one of the many reasons why the cloud is a bad idea.
In the same way that a power outage makes cloud storage a bad idea. In the same way that people not being able to check the oil and change a tyre makes cars a bad idea. Baby ≠ bath water.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
But it is a design flaw if the default option is to not warn the driver of low oil levels, or to have no indication of potential problems. Just like it's a design flaw for Adobe products to stop working if they can't authenticate with the servers.

That doesn't make cars a bad idea --it just means they need an oil light. Similarly it does not make cloud storage a bad idea; Adobe just needs a backup plan.
Corky42 20th May 2014, 12:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
No. The code is the same; the graphic resources may come in different versions for different size,screens. But that should be rare as many graphic elements are dynamically resizable.
The code is probably the smallest portion of an application, the portion that takes up most of an application (graphical elements) maybe resizable, but when it can't be the user is still downloading elements they may not need.
IMHO it would be better if universal application were designed to download the core files, that could be shared between different devices, then need a connection on first run, or install to download the specific files needed for the platform it's running on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
In the same way that a power outage makes it a "bad idea". In the same way that people not being able to check the oil and change a tyre makes cars a "bad idea".

Not a bad idea, just something that the user needs to be aware of.
In the same way as people know if they have a power cut they may not be able to run their appliances, or may not be able to do businesses. If having power is vital to them doing business then they would have a backup generator.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
That doesn't make cars a bad idea --it just means they need an oil light. Similarly it does not make cloud storage a bad idea; Adobe just needs a backup plan.
Indeed, but what do you do when your car maker wont put in an oil light, or Adobe doesn't implement a backup plan. My guess is you start to look around for a company that does.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 12:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
The code is probably the smallest portion of an application, sure the portion that takes up most of an application (graphical elements) can be resized, but when i can't the user is still downloading elements they may not need.
IMHO it would be better if universal application were designed to download the core files, that could be shared between different devices, then need a connection on first run to download the specific files needed for the platform it's running on.
That is one way it might work. The code only has to be written once. The graphic resources are appended to cater for different platforms. The downloader picks what it needs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Not a bad idea, just something that the user needs to be aware of.
In the same way as people know if they have a power cut they may not be able to run their appliances, or may not be able to do businesses. If having power is vital to them doing business then they would have a backup generator.
Indeed: the problem is with the user.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Indeed, but what do you do when your car maker wont put in an oil light, or Adobe doesn't implement a backup plan. My guess is you start to look around for a company that does.
Well, we wouldn't get rid of cars, that much is certain. We wouldn't get rid of cloud storage either.
Corky42 20th May 2014, 12:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Indeed: the problem is with the user.
Unless the option is taken away from them, such with what Adobe done.
If the electric company prevented people from using their own generators, what then.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 16:59 Quote
That just means that Adobe has to implement a backup, not that we should get rid of the cloud. Just because a Utility company may act dickish and not let people use backup generators does not mean that electricity is a bad idea.

EDIT: just seeing the Surface Pro 3. The want is strong with that one...
sandys 20th May 2014, 18:02 Quote
Surface 3 looks like tasty hardware, not so sure of the keyboard and stand not quite as flexible as a Yoga but its size looks right up my street.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 18:56 Quote
It's certainly an interesting direction. It tells me the following:

- Surface RT as we know it is a dead end; we know that Terry Myerson is working hard to merge it with Windows Phone, so we can expect a dramatic revamp (no more desktop), with a more powerful OS for mobile phones, and and with smaller tablets being closer to purely mobile devices with all the limitations that entails. I think that for this reason we did not see a Surface Mini today --the OS is not ready yet, and it needs Office Gemini as an USP which is also not ready yet.

- Surface Pro is deliberately designed to look and feel like an iPad but also like an ultrabook. There's a message there... It is a significant step closer to one device doing everything.

- Serious leveraging of the cloud with OneNote, OneDrive etc.

- Apps will probably split into universal apps that run on all Windows devices, and apps that demand the power of x86 devices only. I'm wondering how they will create that distinction. Apps and 'Pro Apps'?

- I expect more convergence of the GUI of Metro and the desktop chrome to make them visually tie together more seamlessly.

- This thing is going to sell. Every business exec that used to have an iPad and laptop will want one of these.
jrs77 20th May 2014, 19:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
- Surface Pro is deliberately designed to look and feel like an iPad but also like an ultrabook. There's a message there... It is a significant step closer to one device doing everything.

And that's imho the biggest issue with the Surface Pro, it tries to be a tablet and a notebook at the same time, which simply doesn't work.

You either want a rather high powered notebook/ultrabook with a good keyboard and mouse input in addition to a long betterylife for all your work-tasks, or you want a tablet for mediaconsumption and communications.

In addition, having a touchscreen on an ultrabook does nothing for me, as I can allways use the trackpad, which is excellent on a MBA for example and having a cover-keyboard on my tablet isn't that good aswell, as soon as I flip it to the backside of the tablet where the keys are exposed and get pressed while the tablet rests on my lap, ect.

So yeah, this one-in-all-thingamabob isn't really working that well imho. Atleast not for me.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 19:30 Quote
I have a Surface and it works absolutely great for me. This would work even better.

Most Ultrabooks have similar low-profile keyboards and certainly no mouse --you have to plug one in, just as you have to with a Surface Pro. The keyboard is detachable for lean-back tablet-only scenarios. And several reviewers who tried it said that they were highly sceptical of touch screens on laptops --until they actually used one.

How many people travel around with an iPad and a laptop in their bag? This may just be the answer for them. Tablet for PowerPoints and taking notes (with pen), for reading and watching video, and laptop for sit-down work.
impar 20th May 2014, 19:54 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
- Surface RT as we know it is a dead end;
No news there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
- This thing is going to sell.
Still too expensive. For consumption there are cheaper alternatives, for creation there are cheaper altrernatives.
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 19:57 Quote
64Gb iPad: $699,--
Macbook Air: $899,--

64Gb Surface Pro 3: $799,--

You sure get a lot of extra functionality for $100 bucks more --or $100 bucks less.
impar 20th May 2014, 20:04 Quote
Greetings!

And a cheap 10" Android tablet plus a Windows laptop?
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 20:20 Quote
Two devices, one heavy. Two things to lug about, with two chargers if you are away from base a lot (possibly three if your smartphone has another plug than your tablet). Two mutually incompatible OSs, with mutually not entirely compatible applications. Some people just don't want all that hassle.
rollo 20th May 2014, 20:24 Quote
Surface pro already sells well. Question is will people buy another version to replace last years. I imagine it been like a macbook if you own the orginal pro the 3rd one is a nice upgrade but going from last years to this years is a bit insane.
impar 20th May 2014, 21:19 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Two devices, one heavy. Two things to lug about, with two chargers if you are away from base a lot (possibly three if your smartphone has another plug than your tablet). Two mutually incompatible OSs, with mutually not entirely compatible applications. Some people just don't want all that hassle.
There are advantages. If one is drained the other might not. One to work and carry around, the other to play. Each device with its owns strengths and weakeness. Files are kept in the cloud and accessed, if needed, by different applications on different systems. Chances are you already have one or both, no need to spend.
To have only one device is too dependent and unpratical.
Beasteh 20th May 2014, 21:50 Quote
That's one sexy piece of kit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollo
Surface pro already sells well. Question is will people buy another version to replace last years. I imagine it been like a macbook if you own the orginal pro the 3rd one is a nice upgrade but going from last years to this years is a bit insane.

Surface Pro 2 is still going to be on sale for while. From the release, it looks like this version has a larger screen (12") which is bound to get some people upgrading. I know I'd like a larger tablet, preferably the size of a piece of A4, but apart from MS and Samsung's efforts, no one seems interested?

Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

And a cheap 10" Android tablet plus a Windows laptop?

Why buy two low-quality devices that will only frustrate you?
Nexxo 20th May 2014, 21:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

There are advantages. If one is drained the other might not. One to work and carry around, the other to play. Each device with its owns strengths and weakeness. Files are kept in the cloud and accessed, if needed, by different applications on different systems. Chances are you already have one or both, no need to spend.
To have only one device is too dependent and unpratical.

That is certainly one valid way of looking at it, and there are also people who want the convenience and integration of one device; one less device to maintain, keep charged, buy apps for, to break down.

If you can choose between a $699,-- iPad plus a $399,-- laptop, or just a $799,-- Surface Pro 3, what might you go for? Especially if you're the company who has to pay to kit out 100+ employees with work devices? And then an IT department to maintain them all?
impar 20th May 2014, 22:44 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beasteh
Why buy two low-quality devices that will only frustrate you?
They dont frustate me?!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
If you can choose between a $699,-- iPad plus a $399,-- laptop, or just a $799,-- Surface Pro 3, what might you go for?
Why an iPad? Switch that for a 399 or less Android tablet.
Corky42 21st May 2014, 07:56 Quote
Microsoft is not aiming the Surface 3 range at the Android tablet crowd, you only have to look at the presentation they gave to see it's aimed at the MacBook Air & iPad crowd.
Guinevere 21st May 2014, 09:40 Quote
Being primarily Mac based (At the moment), I would love an 'all in one' convergence device that is an iPad and is a Macbook.

For video and written media consumption a 'not too big' tablet rules, but I also want a full fat install of OSX for my dev tools and my writing software of choice.

But... While reading, writing and watching Dexter doesn't take a huge amount of power, I need lots of CPU grunt for software compilations.

The 11" Macbook Air is the best device around at the moment and when they go retina with the display I'll probably pick one up. CPU is still woefully inadequate for my needs... but you know... new toy... shiny shiny.

For Windows users MS has a hard time of it as most of them have been very happy to abandon their casual use of Windows for Android / iOS. Someone drops and breaks their iPad, are they going to go and splash out for a tablet that can run full fat windows? Not sure they'll pay the premium.

Surface Pros are wonderful machines, and yes I'd love one, but they're too expensive to be 'tablet beaters' and I think most consumers are going to say 'I may as well get a Macbook Air... I've always fancied a Macbook' if they're willing to spend the dosh and feel they need something to use as a laptop.

Pro users who 'need' windows will love them though and rightly so. They just won't get the mass adoption as iPads, Kindles and Android tablets do.... at least not for a while.
Nexxo 21st May 2014, 10:06 Quote
They are only $100,-- more than a 64Gb iPad. Unless you are committed to the iOS/OSX ecosystem i could see them being a compelling alternative.
Corky42 21st May 2014, 10:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
They are only $100,-- more than a 64Gb iPad. Unless you are committed to the iOS/OSX ecosystem i could see them being a compelling alternative.
And only £80 difference now the UK prices have been published.
I'm not sure people are going to be willing to pay an extra £80 for a pen, and less drive space after the OS takes it's chunk.
sandys 21st May 2014, 11:20 Quote
I've been running Win 8 and full office on my 64Gb w510 (like a surface machine but Atom powered ) for over a year still have loads of space, I have not even used my uSD card slot for more storage which I could do as well as USB if needed, Win 8 doesn't seem to bloat as badly as old MS OS, its footprint is big but it doesn't keep growing

You can't expand the iPad in a similar manner or run full fat everyday office applications, so the £80 gets you quite a flexible powerful machine with cheap storage upgrade options and connectivity for those that need it.

Surface 3 only needs to have good balance where I use it most, armchair and I'm sold, its stand doesn't look suitable though, if its display port can drive 4k I might let the balance slide.
Nexxo 21st May 2014, 11:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
And only £80 difference now the UK prices have been published.
I'm not sure people are going to be willing to pay an extra £80 for a pen, and less drive space after the OS takes it's chunk.

They are going to pay £80,-- extra for a pen and the ability to run anything at all that runs on their desktop PC. They are going to pay extra for essentially having an iPad and a laptop rolled into one.
Corky42 21st May 2014, 12:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
They are going to pay £80,-- extra for a pen and the ability to run anything at all that runs on their desktop PC.
Desktop applications are not optimally designed for touch devices, sure we could add a Touch Cover to make running desktop applications simpler, but that would make the Surface £180 more than the equivalent iPad.

If people are going to spend around £750 wouldn't they just get a MacBook Air with 512Gb instead of the Surface with 64Gb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
They are going to pay extra for essentially having an iPad and a laptop rolled into one.
Well it's only an iPad and a laptop rolled into one if you're willing to spend another £100 for a Touch Cover, until then it's just a tablet.
Cei 21st May 2014, 12:23 Quote
Don't think £750 buys you a 512GB MBA ;) More like a 128GB 11" ;)
Corky42 21st May 2014, 12:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cei
Don't think £750 buys you a 512GB MBA ;) More like a 128GB 11" ;)

I was going on the prices from the Apple store, where it shows them for £750, but looking deeper i didn't see the part that says Up to 512Gb I hate it when marketing departments use the "Up to" statement.

The £750 MBA (128Gb) still provides more storage than the Surface (64Gb) though.
Nexxo 21st May 2014, 13:01 Quote
But then you'd have to add the price of an iPad... Look: it costs more than an iPad because it is also a laptop. It costs more than a Macbook Air because it is also a tablet. It is considerably cheaper and lighter than both together.
Corky42 21st May 2014, 13:24 Quote
Hey I'm not saying there is no market for people who want a tablet come laptop, it just seems to me this is a very small market.

Are people really willing to spend anything from £80 to £180 more at the lowest end of the range just so they can add a keyboard to a tablet, or take one of a laptop so they can use it like a tablet.
Nexxo 21st May 2014, 15:22 Quote
They may be if it means not having to spend even more on two devices that they then both have to lug around.
sandys 21st May 2014, 15:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Are people really willing to spend anything from £80 to £180 more at the lowest end of the range just so they can add a keyboard to a tablet, or take one of a laptop so they can use it like a tablet.

Yes I am, I did do, and will do again :)

Have to say also that whenever I am on trips or have mine in the office, people drool over its ability, news reports regarding Windows 8 has scared quite a few people off of upgrading in general but when I show it to colleagues they get it, haven't convinced many to switch but plenty have said they want to just the high price of entry for a decent spec puts people off, but they don't consider that actually you can get away with less on W8, mine was just an Atom with 2Gb of RAM, and 64Gb disk, handles all my day to day stuff and only struggles driving a big screen, its fine on its native screen.

the i3 Surface 3 would be a speed bump for me :)

its quite annoying that they have moved the windows button to the side like an ipad, I always use landscape when consuming in tablet mode and just like the iPad I'll be hitting that a lot when grabbing it :(
Beasteh 21st May 2014, 20:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar


They dont frustate me?!

Your experience is considerably different to mine. A cheap Android tablet is no fun at all, and is generally underpowered, unlikely to receive updates, cheap to touch, poor battery life, etc. Cheap laptops are worse - underpowered, heavy, prone to overheating, weak hinges...


It looks like MS are trying to create a niche for convertible tablets, more PC than an iPad, and more tablet than a Yoga. That's probably for the best as I can't see them winning out over the established competition.

Windows Phone shows you what happens when Microsoft tries to beat Apple and Google at their own game. I like WP as an OS, but its ecosystem is more of a desert. Top complaint about Windows RT used in the "conventional" tablets (like the Lumia 2520) is the lack of support. By going down the full-fat Windows route, there are plenty of applications ready to run (even if they're not exactly touch friendly, that's what the stylus is for...).

In other news, Adobe is releasing a touch version of Photoshop. If others follow suit, the Surface could be very useful indeed.
impar 21st May 2014, 22:33 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Surface Pro 3 availability and pricing across Europe

If you’re excited about the Surface Pro 3 that Microsoft unveiled yesterday, and you live in the EU, then we have some good news for you. The tablet is available for purchase to virtually all citizens of the European Union.
...
Now here’s the bad news: price variation and lack of accessories. Depending on where you’re buying from, VAT is different, and currency conversion has a lot to say in how much you’ll actually end up paying.
For example, if you’re buying the i3 basic model, the cheapest Surface Pro 3, you’ll be better off buying it in the UK store, where it retails for £639.00, equal to 785.16 Euros, and cheaper than anywhere else.

http://www.neowin.net/news/surface-pro-3-availability-and-pricing-across-europe
Nexxo 22nd May 2014, 07:58 Quote
Now that's a surprise. Normally the UK is more expensive than Europe.

EDIT: and seriously, 748,-- for the base model inc. pen and typecover? Not a bad price at all. The want is strong with this one...
impar 26th May 2014, 22:54 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
There are advantages. If one is drained the other might not. One to work and carry around, the other to play. Each device with its owns strengths and weakeness. Files are kept in the cloud and accessed, if needed, by different applications on different systems. Chances are you already have one or both, no need to spend.
To have only one device is too dependent and unpratical.
Same thought, much more elaborate:
Quote:
What Microsoft gets wrong about the tablet-laptop redundancy
Almost all iPad owners have laptops. Microsoft Surface Pro 3 wants to fix that.
...
Microsoft is not necessarily wrong that maybe now tablets and laptops are similar enough, hardware-wise, that we can move around from home to the office with one device plastered to our sides. But Microsoft's other selling points for the Surface, like its cloud integration, are also a vote in favor of multiple devices. It doesn't matter if you keep a separate tablet on your couch and leave your laptop at home; everything data-related is everywhere anyway.

The last consideration is price. As we mentioned, tablets have long been a luxury item, even if they have a pretty well-defined, casual-use niche by now. Surely it would make more sense for a customer to buy a device that can fulfill both tablet and laptop functions, if possible.

But the Surface can't quite cover that base, either. The device starts at $799 for a modest Core i3 model, and goes up to $1,949 for the highest-end Core i7. That's not including the Type Cover keyboard (an extra $130). Tablets are cheap enough now that it is possible to cover both device bases for under $1,000. Tablets as a category are still growing, but the growth has slowed. PCs are also still growing worldwide, but at a much slower rate.

Microsoft's latest Surface pitch has a chance to succeed with people who are either frustrated with having to choose between a laptop and a tablet, or who have both but see them as impractical. But despite the seemingly damning 96-percent statistic, that is not most people who are interested in tablets anyway. Many people purposefully have both devices because a tablet fills a distinct need, and because of the cloud, the only difference between having two devices and one is that you have to carry the one you have around. So, like with all of the convertible laptop-tablets that have come before, we won't be surprised if this pitch's initial effect doesn't play out to a grand success.
...
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/05/what-microsoft-gets-wrong-about-the-tablet-laptop-redundancy/
Nexxo 27th May 2014, 07:43 Quote
Yup, you can buy two middle-of-the-road devices for under $1000,-- or a single top-end device for about $900,--. YMMV.
rollo 27th May 2014, 11:22 Quote
Ignoring the iPad comparisons which are 2 totally different markets for the record.

I have a 128gb surface pro 2 and a MacBook Pro that I take around with me on a day to day basis. They both cover different things for me. But I'd say I'm in the niche market of those that need 2 devices.

Touch compatibility is still poor in none touch made apps its improving but it's not there yet. If you take for example adobe its a tricky thing to control on touch. Microsoft office which got remade for surface pro is a example of it done right.

Surface pro is not perfect though
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