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Intel upgrades Bay Trail NUC to Celeron N2830

Intel upgrades Bay Trail NUC to Celeron N2830

Intel's NUC DN2820FYKH kit is to get a free upgrade to the bug-fixed and speed-bumped Celeron N2830, as the months-old N2820 gets discontinued.

Intel has officially discontinued its Celeron N2820 Bay Trail chip mere months after launch, replacing it in its own NUC DN2820FYKH Kit with the faster and bug-fixed Celeron N2830.

A low-cost entry-level model based on the Bay Trail architecture, the NUC DN2820FYKH Kit bundled Intel's 7.5W Celeron N2820 processor with a NUC motherboard and casing, offering two cores running at 2.13GHz - 2.39GHz burst - in a low-power, small-footprint system. The launch wasn't without its problems, however, with reports of driver glitches and issues with the on-chip USB controller causing early adopters no small amount of heartache.

Some of those flaws, it would appear, have been traced back to the processor's design. Despite only launching late last year, Intel announced back in February that the chip was to be officially discontinued. In all cases, manufacturers who are currently receiving the Celeron N2820 were told to move to the N2830. A bug-fixed successor launched early this year, the Celeron N2830 boosts the clockspeed slightly to 2.16GHz - 2.41GHz burst - while retaining the 7.5W thermal design profile (TDP) and 4.5W scenario design power (SDP) of its predecessor, along with the $107 recommended price tag. The memory controller is also modified, adding support for DDR3L-1333 low-power modules.

The move to discontinue the months-old chip is to have an impact on the recently-launched NUC DN2820FYKH Kit: silent cooling specialist site FanlessTech was the first to notice the move in an official Product Change Notification sent to Intel's customers earlier this week, confirming that the N2830 would be the new standard chip for the DN2820FYKH.

Those in the market for a low-power Bay Trail NUC are warned: Intel has confirmed that it is holding inventory of the earlier N2820 models, and will deplete said inventory before shipping the upgraded revision to its customers. Coupled with retailers' own stock, it could be a while before the upgraded NUC kits actually start filtering into customers' hands.

6 Comments

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Bede 25th April 2014, 00:19 Quote
Surprised they're still shipping chips with known hardware faults. Not entirely ethical, to my mind anyway. Ethics aside, I'm always astonished that they can make chips doing 2+GHz in a 7.5W TDP!
TheMadDutchDude 25th April 2014, 01:53 Quote
So they know there's a problem with the chips but they continue to hold stock and expect customers to deal with it? Naughty Intel! They should recall the lot, and replace them free of charge.
littlepuppi 25th April 2014, 08:41 Quote
Article says the chip is bug fixed!!? Am i missing something?
Gareth Halfacree 25th April 2014, 09:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlepuppi
Article says the chip is bug fixed!!? Am i missing something?
Yes: the last paragraph of the article.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Article
Those in the market for a low-power Bay Trail NUC are warned: Intel has confirmed that it is holding inventory of the earlier N2820 models, and will deplete said inventory before shipping the upgraded revision to its customers. Coupled with retailers' own stock, it could be a while before the upgraded NUC kits actually start filtering into customers' hands.
littlepuppi 25th April 2014, 11:29 Quote
Ahh, ok, that is a joke.
azazel1024 25th April 2014, 14:00 Quote
What I kind of don't get is why they are so darned expensive? z3770 runs something like $37 a pop in 1000 trays, but this runs $107 in 1000 trays. I know that it has more features (like SATA support and stuff), but it is a cut down core count. I do wonder if Intel is simply being honest on the z3770, but isn't advertising the true price to OEM/ODMs on the bay trail m/d line up. After all, there are several celeron based mITX boards that are less than the 1000 tray price of the processor on the board. I can't imagine that the OEM/ODMs are willing to take a huge hit just to make volume, so I assume Intel is subsidizing and/or offering big discounts on actual orders of the m/d chip lineup.

Anyway, I don't see what would make the chip 3x more expensive.
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