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Nvidia unveils GeForce GTX Titan Z at GTC

Nvidia unveils GeForce GTX Titan Z at GTC

Jen-Hsun Huang surprised crowds at the GTC 2014 event with the unveiling of the company's most expensive GeForce card ever, the GTX Titan Z.

Nvidia surprised the crowds at its annual GPU Technology Conference last night with the announcement of a new top-end graphics card, the dual-GPU GeForce GTX Titan Z.

Featuring a pair of Kepler GK110 chips, the Titan Z offers 5,760 CUDA processing cores both running at full speed. Each has 6GB of GDDR5 video memory, for a combined total of 12GB - a figure more usually associated with the company's Tesla accelerator boards than its GeForce consumer GPUs. Sadly, beyond the usual claims that it's the world's fastest graphics card, Nvidia did not share full specifications at the event beyond promising that both GPUs are clock-linked, meaning there'll be no bottlenecking involved.

Nvidia was also quiet on thermal design profile (TDP) at the unveiling, but with the single-GPU GeForce GTX Titan on which the Titan Z is based drawing 250W it's hard to imagine that the company has found a way to jam two GPUs onto a card without a major increase in power draw. That said, Nvidia has claimed that the card will be 'cool and quiet rather than hot and loud, promising low-profile components for a triple-slot design and ducted baseplate channels to reduce air turbulence and therefore noise levels. Huang also claimed that a triple-Titan Z setup, for those that could afford such a thing, would draw around 2KW in total - suggesting a 500W+ TDP if you allow for other system components.

One thing Nvidia was willing to share, surprisingly, was the price: the card will launch in the US at a wallet-emptying $2,999. Compared with the company's existing GeForce line-up, that's a seriously high price tag - but with eight teraflops of floating-point performance, and Jen-Hsun Huang tellingly describing it as the card for those 'in desperate need of a supercomputer that you need to fit under your desk,' it seems that despite its GeForce moniker the Titan Z is being positioned as an alternative to the Tesla accelerator board family.

8 Comments

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B1GBUD 26th March 2014, 12:45 Quote
Faaaaaaaaaaaaaark......
ChaosDefinesOrder 26th March 2014, 13:22 Quote
Is RAM still mirrored between cores for SLi? This would mean that there is still only 6GB of RAM available for real processing...
Maki role 26th March 2014, 13:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChaosDefinesOrder
Is RAM still mirrored between cores for SLi? This would mean that there is still only 6GB of RAM available for real processing...

Yup, some classic marketing BS again.

Dammit couldn't they have just gone and made a 12GB Titan Black or something? Would actually be useful.
phinix 26th March 2014, 15:50 Quote
Finally something that can play Tetris in 60fps...;)
Baz 26th March 2014, 19:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maki role
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChaosDefinesOrder
Is RAM still mirrored between cores for SLi? This would mean that there is still only 6GB of RAM available for real processing...

Yup, some classic marketing BS again.

Dammit couldn't they have just gone and made a 12GB Titan Black or something? Would actually be useful.

Did I miss something? What possible application/settings is 6GB of VRAM not enough for?
Star*Dagger 26th March 2014, 21:46 Quote
Time to upgrade, anyone want 3 used Titans?
Bokonist 26th March 2014, 22:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Time to upgrade, anyone want 3 used Titans?

Yes please, well one would do tbh...
Who am I kidding, couldn't even justify buying one second hand. I really need to get a better paying job.
rollo 26th March 2014, 23:24 Quote
Ill take 3 lol, If only I was a billionaire. $3k for a gpu is bonkers. Thats like 4 780ti which are faster than the latest launched titan last I checked.
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