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Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever

Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever

The Elite 110 measures just 280m deep and 260mm wide but can house a full-size PSU, three hard disks or four SSDs and a 210mm/8.3in graphics card

Cooler Master has launched what we believe is its smallest ever PC case. The Elite 110 is even smaller than its recent Elite 130 case, which itself is one of the smallest mini-ITX cases we've ever tested.

Despite its tiny dimensions of 280 x 260 x 208mm (w x d x h), it's still able to house a decent system. It's obviously limited to mini-ITX motherboards, but it has room for a front-mounted 120mm radiator for all-in-one liquid coolers.

In addition, there's space for graphics cards up to 210mm/8.3in in length - this includes the likes of the AMD Radeon R7 260X and some R9 270 models although you'll have to go in search of a shortened PCB GeForce GTX 760 if you're after a 7-series Nvidia GPU.

For cooling, there's a 120mm fan up front plus two unoccupied 80mm fan mounts on the side. However, the large mesh front panel and side and top vents should mean that airflow isn't too much of a problem. The PSU sits above the motherboard, which is our standard bugbear with particularly small mini-ITX cases as it makes regular trips inside the case a little awkward, but it's still impressive the Elite 110 can actually house a full-size PSU - this is possible because a good inch of it sticks out the back, mind.

For storage, there's room for three 3.5in hard disks that sit at the edge of the case, or for up to four SSDs, with other options being two of each or one hard disk and three SSDs.

Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever *Cooler Master launches the Elite 110 mini-ITX case Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever *Cooler Master launches the Elite 110 mini-ITX case
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Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever *Cooler Master launches the Elite 110 mini-ITX case Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever *Cooler Master launches the Elite 110 mini-ITX case
Click to enlarge

Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever *Cooler Master launches the Elite 110 mini-ITX case
Click to enlarge

Cooler Master Elite 110 mini-ITX case is its smallest ever *Cooler Master launches the Elite 110 mini-ITX case
Click to enlarge

Due to the PSU resting right over the motherboard, CPU cooler height is limited to 76mm, although you can mount the PSU with the fan pointing upwards so they shouldn't be competing for airflow.

The Cooler Master Elite 110 looks set to retail for a similar amount as the Elite 130, which is around £35/$50. We'll hopefully be taking a closer look at it soon.

22 Comments

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Corky42 10th January 2014, 12:41 Quote
What with all the really great mini-ITX cases on the market nowadays you would think the PSU manufactures would step up and make some decent SFF PSU's
At the moment AFAIK the choice of SFF PSU's is very small and its near nigh impossible to find one above 500W.
jrs77 10th January 2014, 13:50 Quote
That's about the biggest acceptable size for a mITX-case, but the layout of this one isn't especially well thought out imho.

Having only the fan of the PSU as an exhaust for the case isn't helping to run the components silently, especially when talking about fitting a GTX760 or something like it.

Also. Either out the front I/O ontop or in the front. What's with this I/Os in the side, where you can't reach it easily, while sitting infront of your screen. When it's sitting besides your screen the I/O is either behind the screen, or it's on the far side where you have to search for the port.

Build a mITX like a "normal" ATX tower with 15 liters and it'll only be 310mm tall, 180mm wide (which allows for bigger CPU-coolers) and some 250 deep, which even let's you fit an AIO-watercooler for the CPU and standard-sized GTX760. Even has enough room for two 3.5" HDDs or four 2.5" SSD/HDDs and a 92mm exhaust fan in addition to the standard-sized ATX-PSU. All in 14 liters.

I don't understand the urge to design these mITX-cases like cubes insted of "normal" towers. Cube-designs are only nice for smaller systems, maximum 200mm³, but these can't fit standard dual-slot GPUs or ATX-PSUs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
What with all the really great mini-ITX cases on the market nowadays you would think the PSU manufactures would step up and make some decent SFF PSU's
At the moment AFAIK the choice of SFF PSU's is very small and its near nigh impossible to find one above 500W.

The best SFX-PSU currently on the market is the Silverstone ST45SF-G, and a 450W PSU is totally enough for an intel i7 (95W) + a single GTX760/GTX770 (150-200W).
SchizoFrog 10th January 2014, 14:09 Quote
This thing looks like a cheap and nasty speaker and would belie what could be a very nice system inside. If I want a compact Mini-ITX system there are far better cases that not only look nicer but they perform better while often being even more compact (albeit without a standard PSU).
Corky42 10th January 2014, 14:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
The best SFX-PSU currently on the market is the Silverstone ST45SF-G, and a 450W PSU is totally enough for an intel i7 (95W) + a single GTX760/GTX770 (150-200W).
So that leaves you with around 150W for everything else in the system, while that's within range of the maximum you would expect the rest of the system to draw it doesn't leave a lot of head room.
Bindibadgi 10th January 2014, 14:31 Quote
The problem is that it relies on a short graphics card like the GTX 760/670 DirectCU Mini. There's absolutely no guarantee anyone can make next gen the same length. Currently can't make Radeon series that length...
Combatus 10th January 2014, 14:36 Quote
How much headroom do you need? ;) Our test systems with mid-range graphics cards such as the GTX 760 use around 250W in games, probably around 300-400W if you fully load the CPU and graphics card at the same time, which isn't going to happen in a majority of people's PCs unless they're running synthetic benchmarks or are mining bitcoins. But this it with fans, had disks and SSDs running too - we note the total system power draw, so really, 450W is plenty of headroom unless you're going for £500 graphics cards, especially as hardware is generally getting more power efficient.
jrs77 10th January 2014, 15:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
So that leaves you with around 150W for everything else in the system, while that's within range of the maximum you would expect the rest of the system to draw it doesn't leave a lot of head room.

This is the way I approach it. I add up the maximum powerdraw of the CPU + GPU and add some 100 Watts for the rest (motherboard, 2-3 HDDs, optical drive and some 2-4 120mm fans). And as you usually don't run a system at 100% for more than a couple minutes, if at all, this should be suffcient enough.

To this day I've never owned a PSU with more than 500 Watts actually.
Corky42 10th January 2014, 16:14 Quote
OK i over estimated the need for more than 450W in a SFF system :o, but i still think the range of SFF PSU's are rather limited compared to the amount of SFF cases. Its either go with a full ATX PSU, or a SFF one from the only two company's that seem to make them.
MrJay 10th January 2014, 18:57 Quote
I was running an AMD ITX system for years on a 400w PSU
Athlon II 640 CPU (95w)
ASUS ITX board (880 chipset based)
HD 6850 (150w)
Blu-Ray drive
2 x 3.5" drives
1 x SSD
1 x 140mm fan
2 x 120mm fans (inc cooler)

Lovely case though! Iid snap that up if I had the money for an ITX build.
DBA 11th January 2014, 17:59 Quote
Why exactly CoolerMaster won't produce an SFX PSU is beyond my guess. You would have thought that now with Steam Machines well on their way and thus a small push for smaller gaming PCs, more manufacturers would have shown some love for the SFX PSU.
jrs77 11th January 2014, 18:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DBA
Why exactly CoolerMaster won't produce an SFX PSU is beyond my guess. You would have thought that now with Steam Machines well on their way and thus a small push for smaller gaming PCs, more manufacturers would have shown some love for the SFX PSU.

Problem with SFX-PSUs is the noise-level - atleast with the ones I've tested so far.

Ive had a 180W Chieftec, the 300 and the 450W from Silverstone and a 350W from bequiet. They're all good at delivering power, but the 80x10 or 80x15mm fans are very noisy, even when the PC is idling.
Changing the fans does help alot, but it can't be done without soldering the 2-pin connectors to the new fans and you'll loose warranty ofc.
jhanlon303 11th January 2014, 19:55 Quote
My 110 case shipped Thursday for a Monday delivery. I'll see what I like about it and what we can change to fix it up.

John
Star*Dagger 13th January 2014, 02:05 Quote
Never in a million years. And if your PSU only has 100 watts left over you are asking for serious trouble.
Bindibadgi 13th January 2014, 02:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Never in a million years. And if your PSU only has 100 watts left over you are asking for serious trouble.

No way. Any quality PSU should work up to its rated wattage otherwise it's not doing its job properly.
bawjaws 13th January 2014, 10:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Never in a million years. And if your PSU only has 100 watts left over you are asking for serious trouble.

Well, that's just a load of bollocks, isn't it?
Corky42 13th January 2014, 11:00 Quote
Maybe my thinking is outdated or just plain wrong, but i thought PSU's are most efficient when working at 50% load. I have to admit it sounded wrong when i read it but im no expert on the workings of PSU's
Shirty 13th January 2014, 12:19 Quote
I'm starting to wonder whether these tiny ITX cases might start to benefit from rackmount style cooling, with a single fan or fan array pushing/pulling air through all the components.

Although it would be hard to make this compatible with the motley selection of enthusiast hardware we'd want to shove in there...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Maybe my thinking is outdated or just plain wrong, but i thought PSU's are most efficient when working at 50% load. I have to admit it sounded wrong when i read it but im no expert on the workings of PSU's

50-75% iirc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawjaws
Well, that's just a load of bollocks, isn't it?

I've learned to enjoy the one or two days a month that S*D chooses to grace us with is trollworthy presence. :)
DarkFear 14th January 2014, 08:13 Quote
I've had my eye on one of these for a while now.

I was thinking that since the case is 280mm long/deep/whatever, you should be able to fit a full size GPU in there like with the Silverstone SG05 by cutting a hole in the front of the case and having the card protrude through the hole and into the plastic front bit.

Only one way to find out I suppose...
samuraiweasel 9th February 2014, 13:12 Quote
@jhanlon303
where did you get yours from mate? and any updates? pics?
Andy Mc 25th February 2014, 10:04 Quote
Any news on a UK release for these?
DarkFear 27th February 2014, 19:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkFear
I've had my eye on one of these for a while now.

I was thinking that since the case is 280mm long/deep/whatever, you should be able to fit a full size GPU in there like with the Silverstone SG05 by cutting a hole in the front of the case and having the card protrude through the hole and into the plastic front bit.

Only one way to find out I suppose...

Got my case today, the 280mm measurement is WITH the PSU extension bit. The chassis itself is ~25cm so "normal" ~27cm GPUs won't fit. :(

You should be able to fit a graphics card that's longer than 22cm if you modify the front of the chassis ala Silverstone SG05 though....
Otis1337 27th February 2014, 19:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Never in a million years. And if your PSU only has 100 watts left over you are asking for serious trouble.

Beg to differ. Having 100w's left over from maximum draw is completely fine and safe.
Like bindi said, you have a poor PSU if is cannot run at maximum wattage when ever you need it too.

Its always good to have a little head room, but 50 watts would be plenty.
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