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Razer outs Project Christine concept PC

Razer outs Project Christine concept PC

Razer's Project Christine concept promises quick upgrading using liquid-cooled, pod-based modules - but is, sadly, merely a concept design for now.

Peripherals specialist turned PC manufacturer Razer has unveiled a concept design for a modular gaming PC, dubbed project Christine, which offers plug-and-play configuration without the requirement for technical knowledge.

Designed for gamers who want a custom PC but who lack the knowledge to shove a PCI Express card in the right way round, the Christine concept system uses a central pillar to which component modules are connected across a proprietary PCI Express backplane. Each module is self-contained and liquid-cooled - full-immersion oil cooling, according to Razer - and contains the components most commonly upgraded: graphics cards, storage devices, and - interestingly - even the system's power supply. A dual-slot module containing a touch-screen interface is also suggested as a potential accessory. The CPU, however, would remain in the central pillar - meaning upgrading that component is off-limits without a screwdriver and considerable patience.

'Project Christine is a new concept design that will revolutionise the way users view the traditional PC,' crowed Razer co-founder and chief executive Ming-Liang Tan at the concept's unveiling during Razer's CES presentation. 'This is the first gaming system that is able to keep pace with technology and could allow consumers to never buy another PC, or gaming system, again. We have a history of bringing incredibly innovative concept systems to market and it’s fair to say that Project Christine is a very exciting new prospect for future development.'

While all the technology described by Razer for Project Christine exists, it's far from ready for commercialisation: pod-based, liquid-cooled systems are currently limited to data centre use where their extreme cost and the complexities involved in ensuring a given module can be detached from the system without draining the entire cooling loop or risking a leak are less of a concern. Bringing the price of such a system down to the level where gamers could purchase it won't be easy.

Razer has not suggested when - or if - it will bring Project Christine to market, but has released a teaser video espousing its various advantages over traditional PC designs.

19 Comments

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Combatus 8th January 2014, 11:01 Quote
Hmm, a bit like a Level 10, and we all know how they went down :D
r3loaded 8th January 2014, 11:16 Quote
The immersion oil cooling bit is what really interests me more than anything else. Anything that makes liquid cooling easier to do is worthy of interest.
greigaitken 8th January 2014, 12:49 Quote
This looks like it will appeal to rich beginners.
Aren't they the guys who get high end custom rigs built for them anyway.
phuzz 8th January 2014, 13:10 Quote
An all in one watercooling system is pretty damn easy to fit already. Certainly easier than many bits of flat pack furniture I've put together.
DriftCarl 8th January 2014, 14:00 Quote
I have never done watercooling, and have been building my own PC's for 15 years.
This does sound cool, just get the latest gfx card module from NVidia/AMD that Razor would produce and plug it in.
I would still prefer to build my own pc though anyway so I won't be getting one.
Woodspoon 8th January 2014, 17:43 Quote
"could allow consumers to never buy another PC, or gaming system, again"
Yeah, heard that more than one or two times before.
Corky42 8th January 2014, 17:44 Quote
Leaving the CPU in the main tower kinda makes the rest of the system pointless, or is it aimed at people that can't replace a graphics card or HDD/SSD, maybe some would struggle if the had to replace a PSU ?
Cheapskate 8th January 2014, 18:46 Quote
So... Proprietary everything?
Wow, not even Dell has tried that.
This will look so good next to my $10,000 ashtray/mac.
-Comes with Razer's legendary QC.
SAimNE 8th January 2014, 20:49 Quote
this looks so epic i'd probably have to buy it despite it's insane price. also there was an interesting tidbit of subscription based parts that was being considered by linustechtips that i thought would be awesome.

not to mention the idea of a system with mineral cooling that would be warranty supported is absolutely amazing to me.... it has the looks, the performance, and innovation..... now all we can hope is they dont f it up somehow because they have every chance to in this situation XD
SAimNE 8th January 2014, 20:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheapskate
So... Proprietary everything?
Wow, not even Dell has tried that.
This will look so good next to my $10,000 ashtray/mac.
-Comes with Razer's legendary QC.
they havent given word about whether or not other people will be able to make the cartridges for it. chances are if it has high demand they will allow most of the proven manufacturers to make and design parts for it..... plus it's a gem for advertising... your logo would be seen by any and all that looked at the system with the current design.
SAimNE 8th January 2014, 20:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Leaving the CPU in the main tower kinda makes the rest of the system pointless, or is it aimed at people that can't replace a graphics card or HDD/SSD, maybe some would struggle if the had to replace a PSU ?
i think the main point would be the mineral oil cooling system. also while it's easy to trade the cards, this also includes slapping in a card with a high grade cooling system in all of about 30 fricken seconds and half of that is taking the card out of the box.
AlienwareAndy 8th January 2014, 23:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3loaded
The immersion oil cooling bit is what really interests me more than anything else. Anything that makes liquid cooling easier to do is worthy of interest.

From the research I've done on oil cooling it's really not very good, unless you are looking for absolutely no noise.

I'm really not sure why Razer seem hell bent on spending so much money on stuff that ends up so expensive hardly any one can afford it.
CowBlazed 9th January 2014, 00:36 Quote
I'll go out on a limb here and say it's because they can. Also publicity. Having projects like this puts their brand in the public eye and average Joe is more likely to buy one of their cheaper peripherals.
iggy 9th January 2014, 03:11 Quote
Quote:
Designed for gamers who want a custom PC but who lack the knowledge to shove a PCI Express card in the right way round

you have just described console users.
SAimNE 9th January 2014, 07:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienwareAndy
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3loaded
The immersion oil cooling bit is what really interests me more than anything else. Anything that makes liquid cooling easier to do is worthy of interest.

From the research I've done on oil cooling it's really not very good, unless you are looking for absolutely no noise.

I'm really not sure why Razer seem hell bent on spending so much money on stuff that ends up so expensive hardly any one can afford it.

oil coolings only draw back was that the heat built up due to the fact that when you drop a mobo in the oil you cant really make sure all the oil flows properly to distribute heat. thus you had heat building up in the dead spots. by the looks of this design each module will have flow going through and if they are properly designed to allow proper flow then there is no longer any drawback
ModSquid 9th January 2014, 16:11 Quote
How do you "slot in" to any liquid cooled system? That would suggest some ingeniously-valved connectors.
ArcAngeL 9th January 2014, 20:39 Quote
i wonder if the project manager had a ex gf named Christine, who liked multiple inserts from both sides?
forum_user 9th January 2014, 20:50 Quote
Not only does it look incredibly sexy, maybe it would suit my future PC gaming needs. I have my fingers crossed for Razer!
Nexxo 9th January 2014, 21:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ModSquid
How do you "slot in" to any liquid cooled system? That would suggest some ingeniously-valved connectors.

They're called no-spill couplings. They've been on the market for some time, mainly for industrial applications although they are starting to appear on the PC water cooling scene. They're really good for external cooling rigs.
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