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LG unveils world's first Chrome OS all-in-one

LG unveils world's first Chrome OS all-in-one

The LG Chromebase all-in-one is the first to come with Google's cloud-powered Chrome OS, backed by a low-cost Intel Celeron processor.

LG Electronics has become the first company to announce an all-in-one PC based on Google's Chrome OS cloud-powered operating system, a platform more normally associated with ultra-portable laptops.

Based on Linux, Chrome OS eschews the traditional computing paradigm in favour of turning the Chrome browser into the primary user interface. Applications are rarely installed locally, with the user instead being pointed to web-based apps which make heavy use of the browser's HTML5 and JavaScript support. The downside, for users who didn't pay extra for a Chromebook with in-built mobile broadband at least, is that the device loses a great deal of its feature set when disconnected from the internet.

Disconnections may be frequent for road warriors, but less so for those who do the majority of their computing at home. It's in this typically permanently-connected environment that LG hopes to push Chrome OS as a real alternative to the like of Microsoft Windows. Step one: the world's first Chrome OS all-in-one desktop PC, the Chromebase.

Looking for all the world like a slightly bulky monitor, and owing an undeniable debt of gratitude to Apple's curved iMac design, the Chromebase packs a Haswell-based Celeron processor, 2GB of RAM, 16GB of local storage - the bulk storage of files being offloaded to the Google Drive cloud platform - and a 1.3 megapixel front-facing webcam with support for 720p video capture. The front, meanwhile, is dominated by the Chromebase's 21.5" 1,920x1080 in-plane switching (IPS) liquid-crystal display panel. The sides and rear include a single USB 3.0 port, three USB 2.0 ports, analogue audio connectivity to supplement the on-board speakers, an Ethernet connection and - interestingly - an HDMI input, allowing the device to double as a monitor for an external system.

'Simple to operate for all types of users, the award-winning LG Chromebase computer represents the successful combination of simplicity, power and great design,' claimed Hyoung-sei Park, head of the IT Business Division at LG Electronics. 'LG Chromebase is the wave of the future for desktops, [and is] expected to be widely adopted not only at home, but especially in schools, hotels, call centres and other business settings.'

Pricing for the LG Chromebase has yet to be confirmed, with the company expected to make a more detailed announcement at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) next month.

10 Comments

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Jack_Pepsi 18th December 2013, 12:11 Quote
2.15"?

I like the idea, not the design and LG have some awesome looking monitors/TVs.
Gareth Halfacree 18th December 2013, 12:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack_Pepsi
2.15"?
I've got a couple of screens around that size somewhere... But yes, it should be 21.5" - fixed, ta!
Guinevere 18th December 2013, 12:39 Quote
Quote:
the device loses a great deal of its feature set when disconnected from the internet.

Not that I'm a fan of chrome OS, but I thought it could be used offline almost as effectively as any other laptop these days? Writing emails. creating and editing documents, listening to music, editing photos... all of these can be done offline.

Sure activities that require a net connection (EG streaming live broadcast media, viewing live tweets) can't be completing when offline but that rule applies to ANY connected device.

I thought the 'point' of chrome was a no frills, no updates needed, low footprint OS designed to run HTML/js based apps rather than traditional 'software' based app installs. I think it's gone further than being a niche experiment, and for many people would be a viable tool. My mother in law for example only uses web based tools so it would be perfect for her (If she didn't want and wasnt getting an iPad!)

Again, not the OS for me but I see a place for it. It's a shame that the likes of Microsoft go spreading mistruths by claiming (though the side of their mouths) that it's useless when not connected to the net.
Gareth Halfacree 18th December 2013, 13:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guinevere
Not that I'm a fan of chrome OS, but I thought it could be used offline almost as effectively as any other laptop these days? Writing emails. creating and editing documents, listening to music, editing photos... all of these can be done offline.
Depends on the app in question; a lot work offline, but a lot don't. If you're using Google Drive, though, you're pretty much golden - as long as the file you're wanting to work on is held locally on the SSD, of course.

While you're here: I'm still awaiting your response on this thread as well as this one. Any chance you might deign to respond, or is admitting you were wrong really that difficult for you?
Snips 18th December 2013, 13:38 Quote
Microsoft were in fact speaking the truth otherwise Google would be seeing them in court Guinevere.

Can't see the point in this device at all. Why use all the tech but then restrict what you can do with it? As useless as the Chromebook.
fodder 18th December 2013, 22:42 Quote
Personally I would see it as ideal in my office, except for the fact that I need a windows machine with a dvd drive to view x-rays/MRI scans etc. All the other software I use is web based, either Drive for word processing etc. or cloud management software. Makes more sense than a chrome book.
Nexxo 18th December 2013, 23:21 Quote
We actually owned one (a Samsung model), and we really wanted to love it. It was nicely built (shame about the mediocre screen), lightweight, had great battery life and fast boot times. But there were too many small details that made for a frustrating and incomplete experience. It had obvious omissions, strange solutions for offline working and although being all online device, it would not talk to a NAS or networked printer. To print from it needed the mediation of a regular Windows or OSX machine. It created the impression to cooperate with MS Office but it did not.

It's a pity, because with some attention to detail it could have been really good. Bit anyone who complains about Windows 8 really should try Chrome for a few days.
theshadow2001 18th December 2013, 23:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
We actually owned one (a Samsung model), and we really wanted to love it. It was nicely built (shame about the mediocre screen), lightweight, had great battery life and fast boot times. But there were too many small details that made for a frustrating and incomplete experience. It had obvious omissions, strange solutions for offline working and although being all online device, it would not talk to a NAS or networked printer. To print from it needed the mediation of a regular Windows or OSX machine. It created the impression to cooperate with MS Office but it did not.

It's a pity, because with some attention to detail it could have been really good. Bit anyone who complains about Windows 8 really should try Chrome for a few days.

You should have put ubuntu on it for the lolz. It would do all you mentioned.
Nexxo 19th December 2013, 09:28 Quote
Thought about it. But it was a machine for my wife, who is not as hard-core geek as I am (at least not when it concerns computers). In the end we sold it and she now has a Lenovo Yoga 11 with Windows RT. It is not full-fat Windows, but it is still infinitely more useful than Chrome.
ArthurB 20th December 2013, 06:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by fodder
Makes more sense than a Chromebook.
I would rather have a Chromebook (or Chromebox) connected to a 24" or 27" LCD personally.

I bet the screen on the LG Chromebase is going to have pretty poor viewing angles like many other Chromebooks do.
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