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Intel Broadwell-K chips tipped to feature Iris Pro

Intel Broadwell-K chips tipped to feature Iris Pro

Intel's next-generation Broadwell-K processors will include Iris Pro graphics with 128MB of embedded DRAM according to a pre-release specification leak.

Intel's next-generation socketed processor, the Broadwell-K family, is to include Intel GT3 'Iris Pro' graphics with embedded memory according to details leaked ahead of its 2014 launch.

Iris Pro is Intel's highest-performance integrated graphics processor (IGP,) introduced as part of the Haswell family. It's not something hobbyists can get their hands on, however: the full Iris Pro experience, which includes a large chunk of embedded DRAM memory dedicated to the GPU, is available only in the company's ball-grid array (BGA) packaged models sold purely to original equipment manufactures (OEMs) in trays of 1,000 or more. The socketed Haswells available at retail, meanwhile, make do with lower-performance Iris graphics hardware with no eDRAM.

According to details leaked to CPU World by an unnamed source, that will all change with the 2014 launch of Haswell's successor Broadwell. The socketed Broadwell chips, dubbed Broadwell-K, will be the first retail models to include Iris Pro graphics with a claimed 128MB eDRAM framebuffer and supposed peak graphics performance some 80 per cent higher than available on existing Haswell processors.

As well as the Iris Pro graphics, which will likely be limited to the company's top-end Core i7 models, Broadwell-K is claimed to be launching in Core i5 and Core i7 variants with only quad-core models currently confirmed. Each will support Intel's Turbo Boost technology, but only the Core i7s will include Hyper Threading support along with 6MB of L3 cache to the Core i5s' 4MB. All Broadwell-K models are claimed to include unlocked multipliers for ease of overclocking.

While Broadwell will be socket-compatible with Haswell, running on the same Intel Socket 1150 platform, the processors are claimed to require brand-new 9-Series chipsets, of which Z97 and H97 will be available at launch. While Intel won't be validating Broadwell with existing 8-Series motherboards, it remains to be seen if any of the company's hardware partners offer BIOS upgrades to add limited compatibility.

Intel, as is usual for the company, has refused to comment on speculation and rumour surrounding unannounced products.

13 Comments

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barny2767 21st November 2013, 11:37 Quote
Always good to see Intel making things backwards compatible.

Ho wait you still need a new Mobo to get a 9 series chipset.

Anyone think Intel is ripping people off here.
GiantKiwi 21st November 2013, 11:41 Quote
They have no decent competition in the consumer market, so they are able to pull any shenanigans they like now.
edzieba 21st November 2013, 12:15 Quote
Quote:
As well as the Iris Pro graphics, which will likely be limited to the company's top-end Core i7 models
This seems ass-backwards. Integrated graphics is great for i3 and i5 builds where you can get away without a discrete GPU (e.g. media-centre, basic office Pc, etc), but if you're plumping for a higher-end CPU you'll likely be buying a discrete GPU too making that integrated GPU just a waste of die space (and money).
rollo 21st November 2013, 12:17 Quote
Iris is expensive.
Gareth Halfacree 21st November 2013, 12:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by edzieba
This seems ass-backwards. Integrated graphics is great for i3 and i5 builds where you can get away without a discrete GPU (e.g. media-centre, basic office Pc, etc), but if you're plumping for a higher-end CPU you'll likely be buying a discrete GPU too making that integrated GPU just a waste of die space (and money).
Not at all. Remember that the gaming market isn't Intel's core demographic. Intel's Iris Pro IGP includes features like Quick Sync, designed to speed up video rendering - meaning that someone doing video-heavy work could easily not bother with a discrete graphics card in their system, saving cash, power draw, heat, noise and space. Even for 3D work, Iris Pro is good enough - especially if you're not rendering directly on the workstation but instead shipping the work out to a renderfarm, or if you're doing ray-tracing with something like one of Imagine's Caustic render cards.

Sure, a gamer will always pair a Core i7 with a discrete GPU or six - but gamers aren't the whole, or even the majority, market.
Corky42 21st November 2013, 12:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Sure, a gamer will always pair a Core i7 with a discrete GPU or six - but gamers aren't the whole, or even the majority, market.

You speak such blaspheme :'(
Quick grab the pitchforks :D
r3loaded 21st November 2013, 12:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Sure, a gamer will always pair a Core i7 with a discrete GPU or six - but gamers aren't the whole, or even the majority, market.
They're going to be the few who'll actually overclock their chips though. Anyone doing workstation stuff as you've mentioned wouldn't dare using a chip beyond its spec if it's time/business critical work they're doing. Hence there's no reason to have it on a K-series chip.
Gareth Halfacree 21st November 2013, 13:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3loaded
They're going to be the few who'll actually overclock their chips though. Anyone doing workstation stuff as you've mentioned wouldn't dare using a chip beyond its spec if it's time/business critical work they're doing. Hence there's no reason to have it on a K-series chip.
Unless they're buying pre-overclocked workstations, which aren't exactly uncommon. Add to that, I know several businesses that mildly overclock their workstations as standard as a means of getting more bang for their buck.
Corky42 21st November 2013, 13:23 Quote
While i agree gamers are probably the few who will OC the chip, the K series is likely to come some 6 months or more after the standard chips. Overclocking and gamers are an after thought to their main market, the cost of totally redesigning a chip would be out of the question.
ZeDestructor 21st November 2013, 13:38 Quote
As much as people are talking about the eDRAM being used for IGP, you're all missing one cool point: we now have a 128MiB block of fast L4 cache, well, faster than RAM, slower than L3 and lower, as is the case with cache levels.

I for one am looking forward to programmers fitting core gameplay entirely into the cache and leaving the RAM out to be used for large resources, like textures and whatnot.
Chicken76 22nd November 2013, 11:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Article
Core i7s will include Hyper Threading support along with 6MB of L3 cache to the Core i5s' 4MB
Are the variants with less L3 cache only the Iris Pro variants, or all the chips in the (what I assume will be named the 5000) -series will have less cache than their 4000-series equivalents?
Gareth Halfacree 22nd November 2013, 11:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicken76
Are the variants with less L3 cache only the Iris Pro variants, or all the chips in the (what I assume will be named the 5000) -series will have less cache than their 4000-series equivalents?
No idea, and Intel ain't saying. Guess we'll be waiting for a more detailed leak, or Intel's official announcement next year, to find out.
ZeDestructor 22nd November 2013, 11:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicken76
Are the variants with less L3 cache only the Iris Pro variants, or all the chips in the (what I assume will be named the 5000) -series will have less cache than their 4000-series equivalents?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
No idea, and Intel ain't saying. Guess we'll be waiting for a more detailed leak, or Intel's official announcement next year, to find out.

If it's like Intel's current Haswell SKUs, you'll get a minor loss of L3 in exchange for a much larger L4/eDRAM block. ( http://ark.intel.com/compare/75131,76088,76642,75122 )

EDIT: of course, being K-seires, we may well see full cache allocations...
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