bit-tech.net

Panasonic unveils 20" 4K tablet PC

Panasonic unveils 20" 4K tablet PC

Panasonic's Toughpad UT-MB5 boasts a 4K-resolution 20" touch-sensitive display, 8GB of RAM and dedicated Nvidia GeForce graphics - in a tablet form-factor.

Panasonic has announced its latest Toughpad device: a Core i5-powered pro-grade tablet computer with a 20" 4K-resolution IPS display.

The giant Toughpad 4K UT-MB5 is a tablet you're unlikely to want to stick in your bag as daily carry: with an impressive 20" diagonal, the IPS Alpha LCD screen offers a 3,840x2,560 resolution - meaning 230 pixels per inch (PPI) and a 15:10 aspect ratio. As an IPS panel, you can also expect good viewing angles - although Panasonic hasn't shared formal figures for that.

Behind the behemoth of a screen - which also boasts 10-point multi-touch tracking - the tablet features an Intel Core i5-3437U vPro processor and discrete Nvidia GeForce 745M graphics processing unit (GPU) with 2GB of dedicated video RAM (VRAM). 8GB of RAM is included as standard, along with a 256GB solid-state drive (SSD) for storage with a copy of Windows 8.1 Pro pre-installed.

Connectivity is covered by an Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6235 Wi-Fi radio with 802.11a/b/g/n support, a Class 1 Bluetooth 4.0 radio, USB 3.0, an SDXC card slot, smart-card reader, and a proprietary connector for an optional docking station which adds three USB 3.0 ports, wired Ethernet and HDMI output. A front-facing camera offers 1,280x720 resolution still and video capture.

As an official Tough-device, Panasonic has also given the tablet a bit of ruggedisation - although not quite to the extent of its main briefcase-sized Toughbook laptops. According to the company's tests, the UT-MB5's glass fibre case and magnesium alloy frame is 'business rugged' and rated for 12" drops to twenty-six different angles when switched off and a 30" drop to its back surface while operating.

The tablet weighs 2.4kg in total, while boasting a surprisingly svelte 12.5mm thickness. That, combined with the powerful Intel chip and large display, comes at a cost to run-time: according to tests using MobileMark 2007, the best the tablet can manage is two hours per charge.

Buyers will also have the option of picking up a Panasonic Electronic Touch Pen accessory, which uses infra-red signals to interact with the display and a Bluetooth connection to communicate with the laptop. Capable of operating at various angles, the pen is claimed to include 2,000 levels of pressure sensitivity.

Panasonic has announced US availability for the Toughpad 4K UT-MB5 for January 2014, at a recommended retail price of $5,999 (around £3,730 excluding taxes.)

33 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
damien c 8th November 2013, 12:12 Quote
Sorry but I am one of those who will pay more for something, than I probably should but I would not pay £3800 for a tablet regardless of who makes it unless it.

I know how good the Toughbooks are but still, I think this is way overpriced.
Gareth Halfacree 8th November 2013, 12:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by damien c
Sorry but I am one of those who will pay more for something, than I probably should but I would not pay £3800 for a tablet regardless of who makes it unless it.
Remember that a 4K monitor alone will set you back from £1,600 to £3,000 at current prices.
RichCreedy 8th November 2013, 12:23 Quote
^^ what he said, it's the 4k screen that makes it that price
GuilleAcoustic 8th November 2013, 12:30 Quote
Interesting, this could be an alternative to the Wacom Cintiq. The stylus has 2048 pressure level and the position sensing has the same res has the screen (3840 points x 2560 points).

Attach that to a nice arm and this could be great, plus unlike the Cintiq this beauty has the computer built in ! I which I had that amount of money to use, would make a nice digital painting toy.
Corky42 8th November 2013, 12:43 Quote
It all sounded good until the part about two hours per charge, that puts it on a rather short leash.
Snips 8th November 2013, 12:46 Quote
I like it, shame on the 2 hours use though.
fix-the-spade 8th November 2013, 12:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuilleAcoustic
Interesting, this could be an alternative to the Wacom Cintiq. The stylus has 2048 pressure level and the position sensing has the same res has the screen (3840 points x 2560 points)

I dunno, I've yet to find a tablet PC that can match a Cintiq for tracking strokes, they always start to lag out after a few minutes. Of course, I've never use a 4k tablet either, so maybe this one's different.
RichCreedy 8th November 2013, 12:48 Quote
wait for the third party add on battery pack
ZeDestructor 8th November 2013, 12:53 Quote
20" 3840x2560...

WHERE THE HELL IS MY 3840x2400 24" wide-gamut desktop LCD?!
damien c 8th November 2013, 13:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Remember that a 4K monitor alone will set you back from £1,600 to £3,000 at current prices.

True but the price of the 4K screens are just overpriced as it is.

I am just waiting for a decent 27" or 30" monitor that is 4K 60Hz for around the £500 mark and then I will buy one but until then I am sticking, with my 1080p and the only way I am going to replace that with anything at the moment is if it breaks and then I will get a 1440p monitor if 4K monitors, are still overpriced.
GuilleAcoustic 8th November 2013, 13:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by damien c
True but the price of the 4K screens are just overpriced as it is.

I am just waiting for a decent 27" or 30" monitor that is 4K 60Hz for around the £500 mark and then I will buy one but until then I am sticking, with my 1080p and the only way I am going to replace that with anything at the moment is if it breaks and then I will get a 1440p monitor if 4K monitors, are still overpriced.

This is the price for new technology. I bought my 17" LCD in 2003 and paid 650€ for it ... 21" where around 1200€
damien c 8th November 2013, 13:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuilleAcoustic
This is the price for new technology. I bought my 17" LCD in 2003 and paid 650€ for it ... 21" where around 1200€

Yep new tech always brings a price tag with it.

I just think they are overpriced, I want one but just not at that price.
GuilleAcoustic 8th November 2013, 13:44 Quote
Hopefully the 1440P screen will see some price drop ... me hope * pwiiz *
Hustler 8th November 2013, 15:39 Quote
Rich gullible idiots should step forward and do their patriotic duty and buy this product, so as to bring down the price of 4K monitors for the plebs.
SchizoFrog 8th November 2013, 18:56 Quote
Can someone explain the disparity about needing high end GPUs to run a 4K display and yet this is able to not only run a 4K display on a 745m GPU (not exactly high end is it?) but it can also do it with the cooling potential of a tablet.

Does screen heat output significantly increase with pixel density as well?
GuilleAcoustic 8th November 2013, 19:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Can someone explain the disparity about needing high end GPUs to run a 4K display and yet this is able to not only run a 4K display on a 745m GPU (not exactly high end is it?) but it can also do it with the cooling potential of a tablet.

Does screen heat output significantly increase with pixel density as well?

high end gpu is only needed to play at 4k res .... 2d display doesn't need much
Mister_Tad 8th November 2013, 19:35 Quote
I could see these being used in EBCs quite a bit, and similarly with designers/architects trying to impress customers.

Suffice to say, if you're posting commenting that it's expensive, it's not for you!

EDIT: And just in case - EBC = Executive Briefing Centre - places where typically tech companies spend millions to impress when hosting potential customers and/or partners.
RichCreedy 8th November 2013, 19:40 Quote
fresh paint would be awesome on this tablet, lol

found a youtube video of said tablet
7HtbhFEK1EE
Gradius 8th November 2013, 20:17 Quote
20" 4K ... nice... price $6K... not anymore.
rollo 9th November 2013, 00:53 Quote
Price is crazy but beside that point intresting to see.

4k 20" should be alot cheaper than 30" 4k from what ive been reading from different people.

2hr battery life kills the product though, that and the fact it is 2.4kg thats a heavy lump however way you put it.
jrs77 9th November 2013, 02:48 Quote
If the Stylus is as good as on a Wacom Cintiq then this unit is a real killer-device for digital painters :)

Here's waiting for some "normal" 23/24" QHD screens with a pricetag below $1500.
desertstalker 9th November 2013, 03:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Does screen heat output significantly increase with pixel density as well?

Power consumption does (as you need more backlight for the same brightness with smaller pixels) and this translates to heat. Probably also why the battery life is so poor.

The GPU would not need to work much harder for a 2D desktop (there would be some power increase but probably not a huge amount).

My biggest problem with these high-res screens at the moment is software support, you need to run at higher DPI settings but most software does not really support this (I have an 11" 1080p tablet). Until that happens forking out a lot of money for high dpi screens is a bit silly IMO.
ZeDestructor 9th November 2013, 10:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
Rich gullible idiots should step forward and do their patriotic duty and buy this product, so as to bring down the price of 4K monitors for the plebs.

Give me 3840x2400 at 24" and as miserable student as I am, I'll give it a serious considerations. It tell sosmething when you can see the pixel grid of a 320ppi phone...
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Can someone explain the disparity about needing high end GPUs to run a 4K display and yet this is able to not only run a 4K display on a 745m GPU (not exactly high end is it?) but it can also do it with the cooling potential of a tablet.

Does screen heat output significantly increase with pixel density as well?

It can output 4k (much like my old-ass MX440 can push 2048x1536@75Hz), it will just fall flat at running any recent games at native res with decent quality settings. Productivity programs like Photoshop will do fine.

Heat output isn't too much of an issue with LED backlighting, as evidenced by 440+ppi phones like my Xperia Z and 300+ppi tablets like the Nexus 10. Compare that to the 70+W of pure heat my 24" Dells with 9CCFLs each put out... They get past the 60°C mark in this Australian weather (~28°C indoors last I checked, but we reach 50+°C during high summer).
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollo
Price is crazy but beside that point intresting to see.

4k 20" should be alot cheaper than 30" 4k from what ive been reading from different people.

2hr battery life kills the product though, that and the fact it is 2.4kg thats a heavy lump however way you put it.

Its not really a mobile use product though, given it's 20" wide... I doubt you can fit that comfortably in first/business class on a plane, let alone a train/bus... Very much a portable desktop/presentation tool, in which case 2hours is perfectly acceptable for a quick show off then repack and mains for extended duration stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertstalker
Power consumption does (as you need more backlight for the same brightness with smaller pixels) and this translates to heat. Probably also why the battery life is so poor.

The GPU would not need to work much harder for a 2D desktop (there would be some power increase but probably not a huge amount).

My biggest problem with these high-res screens at the moment is software support, you need to run at higher DPI settings but most software does not really support this (I have an 11" 1080p tablet). Until that happens forking out a lot of money for high dpi screens is a bit silly IMO.

See above.

As for hiDPI, well, yes, but then again, general apathy and the complete halt of display development around 2003 (curse you netbooks!) meant nobody bothered making DPI-independent programs on Windows desktop. In Linux scaling works just fine (I had to manually set KDE back to 96dpi mode on my 15" 1920x1200 laptop), as it does on Android, OSX, iOS and Metro.

In short, this is barely upto par with Big Bertha (aka IBM T220/T221) from back in 2001, which required 4 DVI links to work properly at a miserable 41Hz. IPS though...
Bobman 9th November 2013, 23:09 Quote
What is the target user of this sort of device?
RedFlames 9th November 2013, 23:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobman
What is the target user of this sort of device?

FOX News?
leslie 10th November 2013, 00:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by fix-the-spade
I dunno, I've yet to find a tablet PC that can match a Cintiq for tracking strokes, they always start to lag out after a few minutes. Of course, I've never use a 4k tablet either, so maybe this one's different.

I never used my old Penabled Fujitsu tablet long enough with Windows to experience that. I bought it used and immediately ditched Windows XP and installed Linux, Wine, and then Photoshop CS4. While small for someone who does art on a daily basis (12in), for occasional use, it's perfect. Much nicer than using a Bamboo and for not much more money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedFlames
FOX News?
I would love to ask those employees how much they hate those screens after a few days.
ZeDestructor 10th November 2013, 04:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobman
What is the target user of this sort of device?

Architects and marketing people I'm guessing... Artists will stick to their Wacom Cintiqs really damn hard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by leslie
I never used my old Penabled Fujitsu tablet long enough with Windows to experience that. I bought it used and immediately ditched Windows XP and installed Linux, Wine, and then Photoshop CS4. While small for someone who does art on a daily basis (12in), for occasional use, it's perfect. Much nicer than using a Bamboo and for not much more money.

I use the pen in my Lenovo X220 Tablet (Sandy Bridge 12.5") all the time if I have to do anything handwritten or draw something out to properly design some library I'm about to write...

Said laptop is dual-boot with Windows and ArchLinux, and the pen works nicely on both, even tough for now the pen only really gets any use in OneNote... Nothing remotely similar in Linux-land....
dogknees 10th November 2013, 12:10 Quote
Car battery in a backpack and I'm ready to go! Love to see the look on the masses with their iPads when you pull this out on the train to play a game/check your mail,....
PingCrosby 10th November 2013, 15:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
Rich gullible idiots should step forward and do their patriotic duty and buy this product, so as to bring down the price of 4K monitors for the plebs.

Oooooooo yer cynical git just cos yer glass is half empty ;^)
ZeDestructor 10th November 2013, 15:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogknees
Car battery in a backpack and I'm ready to go! Love to see the look on the masses with their iPads when you pull this out on the train to play a game/check your mail,....

*chuckle*
Star*Dagger 10th November 2013, 19:15 Quote
Gigant-ipad

I would prefer a simple little 37 inch 4k monitor, buy three of them and couple it with 3 Titans from Nvidia.

The current generation ipads are fine for what they do, though they could stand to increase resolution and computing power.

Overall I am quite pleased that 4k is coming, while it will cost me 30,000 euros to replace my Blu-ray collection, it is well worth it!

Most importantly, people will stop seeing "HD" as some sort of standard and maybe game reviewers will stop testing games at horribly low resolutions like 1920x1080.

As far as replacing the cintiq, there is no knowing yet, and if it was a challenge, the fine people at wacom would release their own 4k monster.

Yours in Truly High Resolution Gaming Plasma,
Star*Dagger
ZoomRGS 11th November 2013, 04:18 Quote
I was in a SONY store around my area to experience 4K. It was such a beauty to behold. I was also told by the store attendant that if I was going to buy a 4K TV and need a blu-ray player,it will have to be 4K as well. Does that mean I wouldn't be able to use a standard blu-ray player on a 4K TV?

4K is heavily priced at the moment. Although making more pixels might be an expensive venture but will see a price decline in a few years time when the market gets flooded with different brands. The flat screen will bear witness to the fact that it had the same hefty price tag during its own launch. So I will sit back,relax and wait...........
Nedsbeds 11th November 2013, 23:42 Quote
I was playing with one of these a couple of weeks ago and I just couldn't believe how good the screen is. It certainly seemed to have the power to drive that number of pixels too.
I'm now quite excited about a "hi-resolution" standard that is actually high resolution.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums