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AMD denies Kaveri delay rumours

AMD denies Kaveri delay rumours

AMD claims its Kaveri APU products are still on track, but admits that they won't be available at retail until early 2014.

AMD has denied rumours that production of its next-generation Steamroller-based Kaveri accelerated processing units (APUs) has been delayed, claiming the chip is sticking to its originally planned schedule just fine.

Rumours from Taiwanese supply chain sources had previously suggested that Kaveri will be delayed until early 2014, from AMD's originally-targeted late-2013 schedule. That's something the company has now formally denied, albeit with a caveat or two.

'AMD's ‘Kaveri’ high-performance APU remains on track and will start shipping to customers in Q4 2013,' an AMD spokesperson has confirmed to bit-tech, pointing out that this is in-line with guidance provided by the company at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and Computex events earlier this year. However, the 'customers' the company is referring to are not, as you might think, end-users, but original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) who will be building the chips into their products.

'First public availability in the desktop component channel [for Kaveri will be] very early in Q1 2014,' the spokesperson admitted. '‘Kaveri’ features up to four ‘Steamroller’ x86 cores, major heterogeneous computing enhancements, and a discrete-level Graphics Core Next (GCN) implementation – AMD’s first high-performance APU to offer GCN,' the spokesperson continued, before confirming that Kaveri will indeed require a new socket type: '‘Kaveri’ will be initially offered in the FM2+ package for desktop PCs. Mobile ‘Kaveri’ products will be available later in the first half of 2014.'

While AMD's news that production is on schedule will come as a relief for fans of the company's heterogeneous APU designs, that they won't be able to get their hands on the next-generation parts until early next year will likely be somewhat disappointing - even if it is, as the spokesperson has claimed, in-line with the company's plans all along.

20 Comments

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Marquee 9th August 2013, 12:11 Quote
i can't wait
Snips 9th August 2013, 13:59 Quote
So the rumour of it being delayed until early 2014 aren't true but if you want one, you'll have to wait until Q1 2014?

I see the "spokesperson" had to sound off the PR Marketing BS at the same time as admitting you can't get one until 2014.
jrs77 9th August 2013, 14:01 Quote
Unfortunately it'll still be a 28nm-process, and the CPU will still be miles behind intels offerings.
Gareth Halfacree 9th August 2013, 14:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snips
So the rumour of it being delayed until early 2014 aren't true but if you want one, you'll have to wait until Q1 2014?
AMD's claim is that the rumour of a delay is untrue, 'cos they always intended to release it at retail in 2014 - the Q4 2013 timeframe was for OEM availability. So, in other words: the rumours were right in when it will be available, but wrong to call it a delay. So says AMD, anyway.
Harlequin 9th August 2013, 14:52 Quote
http://www.computerbase.de/news/2013-05/amds-kaveri-apu-bekommt-einen-neuen-sockel/
that's from 3 months ago


but don't worry:


http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2013/07/17/amd-kaveri-delay/1

and the boards

http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2013/07/26/asus-kaveri/1

but don't worry AMD themselves said in May the chips will be launched Q4 2013 back then..
Snips 9th August 2013, 15:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snips
So the rumour of it being delayed until early 2014 aren't true but if you want one, you'll have to wait until Q1 2014?
AMD's claim is that the rumour of a delay is untrue, 'cos they always intended to release it at retail in 2014 - the Q4 2013 timeframe was for OEM availability. So, in other words: the rumours were right in when it will be available, but wrong to call it a delay. So says AMD, anyway.

Gotcha, as clear as mud but hey, it wouldn't be AMD any other way :)
jrs77 10th August 2013, 01:31 Quote
Does it really matter? I mean, intel will release their Broadwell-chips (mobile Haswell-refresh in 14nm!!!) in Q2 2014.

AMD will be 2 years behind intel by the first half of next year in the notebook/mobile segment, where performance/Watt is cruicial.
fluxtatic 10th August 2013, 10:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
Does it really matter? I mean, intel will release their Broadwell-chips (mobile Haswell-refresh in 14nm!!!) in Q2 2014.

We'll see. Last word was, Intel was having problems with the 14 nm process.

Obviously it can't be denied that AMD's behind, but coming off as gleeful about it is stupid - do you really want the whole game to belong to Intel on the desktop? Aren't you paying high enough prices for processors? A competitive AMD means a more competitive Intel, and lower prices for all of us.
rollo 10th August 2013, 10:44 Quote
Bit late in the day to think AMD has any influence on Intels pricing. Look at the top end 2011 platform CPUs they cost nearly £1000.
Harlequin 10th August 2013, 10:46 Quote
Mac Pro using Haswell Pro cpu`s will be using NVidia onboard gfx...... what does that say about GT3e...
rollo 10th August 2013, 13:47 Quote
Does not say anything if I'd spent £2k on a laptop I'd want a dedicated Gpu chip also.
Snips 12th August 2013, 08:33 Quote
Clutching at straws when some say we have to thank AMD for keeping Intel's prices down. There needs to be competition before any effect on prices occurs. Sadly, there hasn't been any for quite some time.
GuilleAcoustic 12th August 2013, 10:57 Quote
Intel is overpriced, it's a fact. I do not hope to see AMD back to the "high-end" competition, but I have great hope to see better APUs in the future (read : low TDP and mid range IGP perf). If they can reach 7850 performance level with their IGP, then it would be a pure win for me.

EDIT : Thin mini-ITX motherboard for FM2+ APUs, I wasn't expecting this :D

http://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/AMD-FM2+-Socket-Mainboard-635x952.jpg
jrs77 12th August 2013, 11:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuilleAcoustic
Intel is overpriced, it's a fact. I do not hope to see AMD back to the "high-end" competition, but I have great hope to see better APUs in the future (read : low TDP and mid range IGP perf). If they can reach 7850 performance level with their IGP, then it would be a pure win for me.

Currently the IGP of an APU with overall 100W (A10-6800K) isn't even on par with a HD7750 (55W TDP), far from it. So hoping for an IGP comparable to a HD7850 (130W TDP) isn't very realistic for the next decade to come.
The second thing is DDR3 vs GDDR5. The AMD APUs IGP is heavily bottlenecked by the DDR3 as most tests show and the reason why Sony chose to go with a unified GDDR5 approach for the PS4.

Kaveri is rumored to have the same core-performance as a HD7750, but then, the new Kaveri-APUs will only have 384 SPUs vs. the 512 SPUs found in a HD7750 and the APUs will still only have DDR3 vs GDDR5 on a dedicated GPU.

The next gen of dedicated GPUs from AMD is not far away either, so we'll probably see a successor to the HD7750 by the time the Kaveri APUs are available for retail.
rollo 12th August 2013, 12:03 Quote
APUs are great if you require the all in one package. If you can fit any form of dedicated GPU like a cheap 7750 you will get better performance than you would from any APU on the market currently. And if your budget is £100 for a dedicated gpu you will blow away any Onboard APU.

The lack of Gddr 5 for the GPU is a major performance defict due to the memory bandwidth alone.

Recently had this discussion with a friend of mine who needed a new gpu for his kids computer he was considering buying the AMD package then kinda relised what it would cost so he just brought a second hand 580 for 5 - 6 times the GPU performance on an old i5 750 cpu chip. ( only 720 resolution so no cpu holding back performance)
GuilleAcoustic 12th August 2013, 12:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
Kaveri is rumored to have the same core-performance as a HD7750, but then, the new Kaveri-APUs will only have 384 SPUs vs. the 512 SPUs found in a HD7750 and the APUs will still only have DDR3 vs GDDR5 on a dedicated GPU.

Kaveri will have up-to 512 GCN SPUs (compared to 384 VLIW4 with Trinity) :). This is a great thing, and I'll be more than happy to have a thin ITX rig with that amount of performance. The only problem is that GDDR5 will prolly be OEM only
jrs77 12th August 2013, 12:38 Quote
My biggest concern is still the CPU-part of the AMD-chips. It simply isn't anywhere close to the performance of what intel offers.

If we look at system-performance vs powerdraw vs cost for small miniITX-systems, then an intel CPU + HD7750 is still the best we can achieve currently. And it would be even better if there would still be CPUs without the dreaded IGP available.

Here's waiting for the Haswell-refresh next year alongside a HD7750 successor.
GuilleAcoustic 12th August 2013, 13:20 Quote
Yup, but Intel has nothing to offer on the thin ITX level, that can match an APU. For an XBMC + Steam BigPicture it is perfect. Also, the steamroller is supposed to really improve the multi-threading performance.

i3 + 7750 is still around 200€ and will consume more than a kaveri APU.
jrs77 12th August 2013, 17:18 Quote
For an XBMC-machine I'm still running an old Zotac IONITX A-E with onboard GF9400. The whole system draws only 30W from the plug in the wall while watching a BluRay. No need for anything more powerful, if it's only about media-playback of any kind.

The AMD APUs are way too powerful allready for a HTPC, and I'd grab an embedded E450- or Atom-board instead.

What I'm talking about is miniITX workstations for graphics, music and media-editing (mostly Adobe CS in my case) and they profit more from the intel CPUs so far, especially singlethreaded, as there's bascially no software so far making any good use of multithreading besides the 3d-rendering-engines, which I'm not using too often for my work.

For the majority of people all of that is of no interest, as all they'll do is some webbrowsing and office-tasks and for them these APUs are reasonable ofc, but for people who actually work with their rigs, well... intel is the way to go currently.
GuilleAcoustic 13th August 2013, 08:52 Quote
While I agree with you on the XBMC-only + Atom / Zacate, I need more than just XBMC. I'll use this rig too play my beloved games too (Terraria, unEpic, SF4, POE, Bloodball and the upcoming StarBound).

My current Q6600 + 4GB DDR2 + GF9300 IGP (XFX motherboard) play unEpic fine on my aging 17" LCD monitor. But all the other are unplayable, even Terraria is below 20fps @ 1280x1024 (prolly a poorly coded game). My wifes E2-1800 notebook plays Terraria and unEpic just fine, but I won't even try SF4 or POE.

This rig will be plugged to a TV because I lack space for a desk. I have to change the TV (who died), the computer screen (who's dying) and my current rig (who's too big and will soon have no desk).

I do not do Photo editing, only digital painting (but that do not use much resources). I'm a software engineer, so the memory size, storage speed / size and the number of cores is more important to me than the CPU speed. Intel HT is a pure joke when you look at the asked priced between i5 and i7. At 180€ for the cheapest i5, it is really too much (I'm on a budget too) especially if I have to add dedicated GPU (even a small HD7750 retails at 80€).

The Q6600 will be recycled as a Linux server, downclocked (too keep it cool and lower the TDP) and shrinked to the bare minimum. It will replace my Synology, can be used for remote 3D rendering, code compilation, media shrinking .... and placed in a curtain. I can use the notebook to write code and then compile it on the Q6600 node.
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