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Samsung announces SSD 840 Evo in sizes up to 1TB

Samsung announces SSD 840 Evo in sizes up to 1TB

The Samsung SSD 840 Evo wil be available in standard 2.5in drive solutions.

Samsung has unveiled its latest range of SSDs in the shape of the Samsung SSD 840 Evo, which will be available in sizes up to 1TB.

The new series is set to replace Samsung's highly regarded and largely class-leading Samsung SSD 840 range, with the key improvement being much faster write speeds.

The Samsung SSD 840 series has read speeds up to 540MBps and write speeds up to 330MBps while the new range ups the latter to 520MBps. Random 4KB read speeds have also improved, going from 7,900 IOPS to 10,000 IOPS.

The drives also boast improved sequential write performance thanks to TurboWrite, a write-buffering technology. This particularly benefits the lower capacity drives (which due to a lower number of NAND modules have lower overall performance), with the 120GB model tripling in speed and the 250GB drive doubling. Meanwhile the 500GB+ drives would be limited to 420MBps were it not for TurboWrite.

Samsung announces SSD 840 Evo in sizes up to 1TB

The drives utilise Samsung's own 10nm 3-bit MLC NAND as well as its new MEX controller. The former is the company's key technology advantage as it still is the only major player in triple-level NAND, with most other manufacturers limited to 2-bit MLC. The reduction in size from 22nm to 19nm also allows for greater data density and thus the higher capacity models.

As well as the new hardware technology the new drives will come with easy upgrade software including Samsung Data Migration Tool 2.0. As well as making it easy for consumers to migrate their data to the new drive it also includes an option to automatically copy media files to another drive.

Available in standard 2.5in form factors and capacities of 120GB, 250GB, 500GB, 750GB and 1TB, the new drives will be arriving in 'the next month or so' with pricing in line with existing SSD840 drives, i.e. from $109.99 to $649.99 (ex taxes).

31 Comments

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bsp 18th July 2013, 03:57 Quote
I never like the 840's much. The figures on the 840 evo look much better!

Still the question of reliability though.
azrael- 18th July 2013, 05:41 Quote
10nm 3-bit MLC NAND? So... you can write to the drive about 1-2 times?
Meanmotion 18th July 2013, 06:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by azrael-
10nm 3-bit MLC NAND? So... you can write to the drive about 1-2 times?

It's NAND made on a 10nm manufacturing process that uses triple levelling so that each cell can store 3 bits.
SchizoFrog 18th July 2013, 07:35 Quote
Great to hear Samsung are making improvements to a product range that was already a class leader and has had great reviews. Now we just need a review from you to see if those numbers are backed up. Here's to hoping that the prices come down further too.

Bit-Tech... Can you do a feature on HDD's any time soon? It's been what? 4 years since your last HDD review or feature and much has happened in that time with regards to the floods and Samsung selling up to Seagate, as well as other things.
What are the 'must have' products to buy these days? Have any improvements in the tech been made? Are the slower 5700 drives any faster than they were? There are so many questions to be asked purely because it has been so long.
I for one would really like an update on the HDD side of things please.
Corky42 18th July 2013, 08:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Bit-Tech... Can you do a feature on HDD's any time soon? <snip> Samsung selling up to Seagate, as well as other things.
<snip>
I for one would really like an update on the HDD side of things please.

I would echo what SchizoFrog is saying ;) what about hybrid drives, are they just a waste of time ? or only of any use for a system drive, even then why bother if SSD's are faster.

Is it not worth buying a HDD under a certain size just as a storage medium, what with all the free cloud storage available now days ?

Will we be seeing Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) in the market any time soon ?

And FYI Samsung selling up to Seagate made me cry :'( never trusted Seagate after having trouble with them many moons ago.
slaw 18th July 2013, 08:50 Quote
Its great to see larger SSD's become avaiable. I am sure the prices will continue to drop too.
koaschten 18th July 2013, 10:04 Quote
I am kind of curious where the 840 PRO fits into the above image? between both? better than evo?
Baz 18th July 2013, 10:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by koaschten
I am kind of curious where the 840 PRO fits into the above image? between both? better than evo?

Got most of the SSD 840 Evo capacities in for testing. Think Evo is a bit slower on the randoms. review next week!
PCBuilderSven 18th July 2013, 10:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Samsung selling up to Seagate made me cry

I was more bothered by HGST selling up to WD
bsp 18th July 2013, 12:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baz
Got most of the SSD 840 Evo capacities in for testing. Think Evo is a bit slower on the randoms. review next week!

Looking forward to it :)
phuzz 18th July 2013, 12:09 Quote
Here at work we've just been testing 840 Pro's in servers, and I can tell you that eight of them in a RAID 10* are ridiculously fast.
They're also cheaper than the HP SAS drives, whilst being faster and higher capacity. What's not to like?

* We found a big difference depending on the server they were in, a brand new DL380 G8 had about twice the transfer speeds of a G6
Farting Bob 18th July 2013, 12:40 Quote
The drive is made on 19nm process, not 10. Samsung referred to it as "1x nm industry leading" which is just marketing make it sound more revolutionary than it is. 10nm is still probably 5+ years away for mass producing NAND.
azazel1024 18th July 2013, 14:41 Quote
Yeah, the article is inaccurate, it is a 19nm process that the new drives are on. 10nm isn't probablyh 5+ years away, but it is certainly at least 3-4 years away.

Micron currently has the smallest process size in a soon to be shipping NAND. They are just now sampling 16nm NAND. IMFT I think is looking at 14nm NAND in the nearish future (I think that is their next step), but I think that is still sometime next year.

Generally NAND follows CPUs/GPUs in that they switch to a new process size about every 20-30 months.

Still nice looking drives. I wonder if Samsung managed to fix some of the power issues with them (they are nice and easy on the battery at idle, but they are PIGS when it comes to read/write power consumption compared to most SSDs...though if nothing else the increased speed should allow it to finish its I/O faster and drop to idle). Now if the price would just come down I'd snap a new 120 or 250 up for my laptop.
Saltire35 18th July 2013, 15:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Great to hear Samsung are making improvements to a product range that was already a class leader and has had great reviews. Now we just need a review from you to see if those numbers are backed up. Here's to hoping that the prices come down further too.

Bit-Tech... Can you do a feature on HDD's any time soon? It's been what? 4 years since your last HDD review or feature and much has happened in that time with regards to the floods and Samsung selling up to Seagate, as well as other things.
What are the 'must have' products to buy these days? Have any improvements in the tech been made? Are the slower 5700 drives any faster than they were? There are so many questions to be asked purely because it has been so long.
I for one would really like an update on the HDD side of things please.

HDDs aren't really worth reviewing any more are they?

Only SSDs are worth comparing imho these days.

Want storage drives... Just get any Western Digital Black drive... job done.
Corky42 18th July 2013, 16:08 Quote
Obviously i cant speak for SchizoFrog, But im not sure he/she was asking for reviews.
Harlequin 18th July 2013, 16:31 Quote
its actually a mix between TLC and SLC - theres a 1 bit SLC nand `turbowrite` to speed up the TLC - apparently similar to ncache on the sandisk extreme 2
Harlequin 18th July 2013, 16:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meanmotion
It's NAND made on a 10nm manufacturing process that uses triple levelling so that each cell can store 3 bits.

the Samsung press release doesn't say that - it says ` 10-nanometer class` which means between 10 and 19nm


and the TLC is 19nm ;) (3bit MLC is TLC NAND)
Dogbert666 18th July 2013, 19:05 Quote
Just to address any of the confusions here:

- The NAND is built on a 19nm manufacturing process

- The 840 EVO is an upgrade to the 840 SSDs; the 840 Pro ones still sit above it in terms of endurance and performance

- With regards to the point that Harlequin raises, the drive is not a mix of TLC and SLC NAND, it's all TLC. A certain number of GBs are treated as an SLC NAND buffer (e.g. 36GB in the 1TB version is treated as 12GB SLC NAND) in order to drastically improve *most* write speeds to TurboWrite speeds. If a set of write commands or a single one manages to exceed this buffer before the drive has a chance to flush it (when idle) to the rest of the NAND, post-TurboWrite speeds kick in and write speeds will slow down.

Naturally there will be a more detailed discussion of the new drive's features and performance enhancements in the upcoming full review.
SchizoFrog 19th July 2013, 00:24 Quote
I was not particularly asking for reviews, but many of the tests that would need to be done to get the answers required for an in depth article would be the same as those for reviews, so I mentioned them. Also, you say that they aren't worth reviewing, but how do you know? Without up to date data we don't know if modern day drives are the same as 4-5 years ago. HDD's are still a massive and lucrative market, especially for NAS drives and other networking storage and so their use is far from dated, it's just slightly been reallocated.
I just found it a little disappointing to realise that such an important component should be left without any sort of updates for nearly half a decade.

I mean come on, who here doesn't have any HDD's and of those that do, who wouldn't miss them if they all suddenly died?

P.S. I am a He. :)
Blackshark 19th July 2013, 08:07 Quote
Storage Review is the place to go for all things HDD (and SSD)
SchizoFrog 19th July 2013, 08:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackshark
Storage Review is the place to go for all things HDD (and SSD)

If you are referring to 'Hardware - Storage' then there is nothing in there regarding actual HDDs in the last 4-5 years. I know, I looked before I made my first comment. :)
John_T 19th July 2013, 15:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog

If you are referring to 'Hardware - Storage' then there is nothing in there regarding actual HDDs in the last 4-5 years. I know, I looked before I made my first comment. :)

I think he means StorageReview.com
SchizoFrog 19th July 2013, 18:46 Quote
Ahhh... See? That's where the confusion lays. Thanks for thin hint John_T, I've never heard of it. Although I would rather Bit-Tech did the article I want as I think I am used to their points of views, rather than moving over to a different tech site.
Abdul Hadi 19th July 2013, 23:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meanmotion
Quote:
Originally Posted by azrael-
10nm 3-bit MLC NAND? So... you can write to the drive about 1-2 times?

It's NAND made on a 10nm manufacturing process that uses triple levelling so that each cell can store 3 bits.

The question is how much write cycles will it give? As the previous MLC's did provide nearly 3000 write cycles (advertised), TLC's can prove to have even lesser write cycles (of course the memory will be too large for TRIM to evenly distribute the data between cells). Any thoughts on that?
John_T 20th July 2013, 00:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Ahhh... See? That's where the confusion lays. Thanks for thin hint John_T, I've never heard of it. Although I would rather Bit-Tech did the article I want as I think I am used to their points of views, rather than moving over to a different tech site.

No worries mate. :)

I see where you're coming from and actually think it's pretty good idea for a general round up of what's happened in the intervening years.

I appreciate most people use SSD's as their base drive now, but people still use HDD's for storage - whether in their main rig or in a NAS box. In my PC I've got a Seagate 2TB ST2000DM001 Barracuda which I regret buying, (it's hot, loud and very sluggish). Next to it I've got a Western Digital 3TB Red WD30EFRX - it averages 6-8 degrees cooler than the Seagate, is quieter, faster, and supposedly uses less electricity. (I'm thinking of getting a couple more and changing my backup drives).

NAS-orientated drives are a new phenomenon since the last bit-tech HDD reviews, so maybe a quick look at those would be worthwhile?
Blackshark 20th July 2013, 07:02 Quote
Sorry John_T - I should have just put the full address of the site in.
fluxtatic 20th July 2013, 09:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_T
<snip>
In my PC I've got a Seagate 2TB ST2000DM001 Barracuda which I regret buying, (it's hot, loud and very sluggish). Next to it I've got a Western Digital 3TB Red WD30EFRX - it averages 6-8 degrees cooler than the Seagate, is quieter, faster, and supposedly uses less electricity. (I'm thinking of getting a couple more and changing my backup drives).<snip>

Huh...off the top of my head, I would have thought "drives is drives", to a large extent. I know better than to buy WD Green drives (slow, head-parking logic is stupid), but for dumb storage in my NAS, the Spinpoint 2TB, Spinpoint 500GB, Seagate 1TB all seem about the same. I've got the OS & programs on the 500, 2TB as primary storage, and back that up between the Seagate and WD drives.

But maybe I'm just bitter I can't get Spinpoints anymore :( I bought nothing but for quite some time.
John_T 21st July 2013, 08:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluxtatic

Huh...off the top of my head, I would have thought "drives is drives", to a large extent. I know better than to buy WD Green drives (slow, head-parking logic is stupid), but for dumb storage in my NAS, the Spinpoint 2TB, Spinpoint 500GB, Seagate 1TB all seem about the same. I've got the OS & programs on the 500, 2TB as primary storage, and back that up between the Seagate and WD drives.

But maybe I'm just bitter I can't get Spinpoints anymore :( I bought nothing but for quite some time.

To be honest, I thought we were more or less at the point where 'drives is drives' as well - that's why I bought the Seagate Barracuda without bothering to do any research, it was cheap and I thought "how much difference can there be now?". Buy in haste, resent at leisure... :)

I'm with you on the Spinpoints though, had several of those, they were great! I bought nothing but Samsung HDD's for nearly a decade, never had a single one fail on me while I used them. Quiet, fast, reliable. Yeah, miss those.
John_T 21st July 2013, 08:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackshark
Sorry John_T - I should have just put the full address of the site in.

No worries mate - that was actually a new site to me, I've had a good look at it and it's brilliant so I've bookmarked it. Thanks for the share! :)
caution 21st July 2013, 17:06 Quote
1TB sounds great - but let's be honest for a moment, unless there are many VM images, is there a reason to go >512GB.
ArthurB 21st July 2013, 18:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abdul Hadi
TLC's can prove to have even lesser write cycles
Not an issue though, is it?

http://uk.hardware.info/reviews/4178/10/hardwareinfo-tests-lifespan-of-samsung-ssd-840-250gb-tlc-ssd-updated-with-final-conclusion-final-update-20-6-2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abdul Hadi
the memory will be too large for TRIM to evenly distribute the data between cells
Source?
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