bit-tech.net

AMD to launch ARM processor, Seattle, in 2014

AMD to launch ARM processor, Seattle, in 2014

AMD Seattle is due to arrive next year, but not look like a lightbulb.

With its 2013-2014 server roadmap, AMD has revealed that its first 64-bit ARM-based server chips, codenamed Seattle, are set to be sampled in Q1 2014 and ready for production in the second half of 2014.

While the chips were first announced last year, the roadmap has shed light on previously unknown details about them. Seattle will be based on ARM's Cortex-A57 cores and a 28nm manufacturing process, and will be made available first as an 8-core CPU and secondly as a 16-core one. As AMD is keen to emphasise, upon its release, Seattle will be the industry’s first such server system on chip. It will also be the first AMD processor to utilise its Freedom Fabric technology, acquired in its buyout of SeaMicro last year.

AMD expects its new chip family to 'provide category-leading throughput as well as setting the bar in performance-per-watt' and to 'set the bar in power-efficient server compute'. It also claims that it will outperform the recently announced AMD Opteron X-Series of processors, based on AMD's own Jaguar cores, by between two and four times, and expects Seattle to reach speeds of at least 2GHz.

As well as 128GB DRAM support, Seattle will deliver 'extensive offload engines for better power efficiency and reduced CPU loading, server calibre encryption, and compression and legacy networking including integrated 10GbE.'

AMD to launch ARM processor, Seattle, in 2014

Details were also unveiled new about the company's Berlin and Warsaw processors. The former will be available as both a CPU and APU and based on a set of four of AMD's upcoming 28nm Steamroller cores. Berlin is designed to offer almost eight times the gigaflops per-watt of the Opteron 6386SE processor and consequently offer a large rack density. It will also be the first server APU built on AMD's Heterogeneous System Architecture, which AMD claims 'makes [GPGPU] programming as easy as C++.'

Finally, Warsaw is AMD's next-generation offering in its two and four socket enterprise platforms, and as such is optimised for heavily virtualised enterprise workloads. Set to supercede the Opteron 6300 family, the Warsaw CPUs will be based on 12 or 16 of AMD's existing 32nm Piledriver cores and provide 'significantly improved performance-per-watt' over said family while also providing an apparently seamless migration path from one to the other.

Both Berlin and Warsaw are expected to be available in the first half of 2014.

AMD to launch ARM processor, Seattle, in 2014

8 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
konstantine 19th June 2013, 22:21 Quote
AMD is going down hell. The company has lost it's sight and it's Flopping around with no visible direction to follow.
SAimNE 20th June 2013, 01:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by konstantine
AMD is going down hell. The company has lost it's sight and it's Flopping around with no visible direction to follow.
they are concentrating on apus(and getting them into both home and servers) as well as working on their development of arm which has been on the way for a loooooooonggg time. the apu for one is their one shot at greatness... anyone who has one has never made a real complaint about what they bought. that coupled with increased support for the gpu/apu crossfire. that's not flopping around, it's a solid game plan for low-mid gaming/home/media pcs, and from what i've heard the jaguar servers wont disappoint on price to performance.

anyway right now is one of the few times i actually LIKE the direction they are heading...
dicobalt 20th June 2013, 03:21 Quote
What the hell is an ARM cpu going to do with 128GB of ram? Next thing you know the Z80 will have support for 1GB of ram. I'm still waiting for a reason to use ARM over x86 on a server.
dark_avenger 20th June 2013, 06:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by konstantine
AMD is going down hell. The company has lost it's sight and it's Flopping around with no visible direction to follow.

They have been pushing their APU's which seems to be working seeings as both the XBOX1 and PS4 have AMD APU's in them....
ch424 20th June 2013, 08:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dicobalt
What the hell is an ARM cpu going to do with 128GB of ram?

There are some applications where you care more about memory and I/O performance than CPU power, so buying a slower (but smaller, cheaper and lower power) core makes sense.
GuilleAcoustic 20th June 2013, 09:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ch424
There are some applications where you care more about memory and I/O performance than CPU power, so buying a slower (but smaller, cheaper and lower power) core makes sense.

I was going to say the same exact thing. At work, we are using a cluster of 34000 CPU (and this is for a single purpose, we have several other clusters), was we care about is the efficiency (we replaced the ultra SPARKs with Opterons only because of the power consuption), the ability to cope with huge data (so lot of RAM) and being able to run a lot of process simultanously (so lot of cores). The core speed is not the most important thing :p
schmidtbag 20th June 2013, 14:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dicobalt
What the hell is an ARM cpu going to do with 128GB of ram? Next thing you know the Z80 will have support for 1GB of ram. I'm still waiting for a reason to use ARM over x86 on a server.

ARM is ideal for home servers, since you want something that is low power and doesn't produce a lot of noise. I suppose it's also good for mainframe servers, where number of threads matters more than pipeline length. ARM is also good in servers because:
* Physically small and light weight
----- You can cram more processors into the same board or chassis
----- Reduced costs of shipping
* ARM platforms are generally cheaper
* ARM performs best on Linux, which a massive % of servers use
* Less power consuming and generally better power management than x86
----- Less heat
----- Less noise
----- Lower power bills
----- Cheaper and easier to maintain emergency UPSs
----- Longer lifespan
----- Lesser need of equipment and parts to keep the processors cool
djzic 20th June 2013, 19:49 Quote
should be interesting to see what comes of HSA, GPGPU needs a boost...
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums