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Asus introduces G10 desktop PC with built-in UPS

Asus introduces G10 desktop PC with built-in UPS

The new Asus G10 range features a portable UPS.

Asus has unveiled a new line of desktop PCs that feature a built-in, portable Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) to protect against data loss due to power outages.

The new G10 range is built around Intel's newly announced 4th gen Core i7 (Haswell) processors and of course feature Asus motherboards as well as Nvidia GeForce GTX650 graphics, 8GB memory, both an SSD and a 1TB hard drive and 32GB of Asus' online storage.

The key feature, though, is a UPS, which is hidden behind the slide-down front panel. This portable unit plugs in and out and includes two USB 3.0 ports for charging devices while on the move.

We're yet to find out how large the battery is or how long it will keep the unit going in the case of power outages but given that the UPS is only about 1cm tall and 20 x 10cm long and wide, we can't imagine it would last all that long.

Nonetheless, it's an interesting, and in many ways sensible, concept, and the system itself looks pretty snazzy. Whether it will arrive in the UK and what it will cost, we're yet to determine.

14 Comments

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B1GBUD 3rd June 2013, 12:40 Quote
I can't believe ASUS are the 1st company to introduce an inbuilt UPS into a PC, great idea, if only to conduct a managed shutdown in favour of total power loss when disks are still spinning.
mi1ez 3rd June 2013, 12:43 Quote
Just hope they can get the software side right...
DaBigDog 3rd June 2013, 15:43 Quote
Come on guys - it's not really a UPS, it's 25 second back-up battery to allow for a quick emergency shut-down, calling it a UPS is really stretching the definition. If you want a UPS, find a specialist and talk to them...

I do work for a specialist - but I'd not be so crude as to advertise them....
RedFlames 3rd June 2013, 16:07 Quote
I remember a while ago there was a workstation laptop and in the marketing spiel the battery was described as a UPS because that's what it's intended purpose was [it wasn't intended to be used as a laptop... it only lasted about half an hour on battery iirc...]
ChaosDefinesOrder 3rd June 2013, 16:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedFlames
I remember a while ago there was a workstation laptop and in the marketing spiel the battery was described as a UPS because that's what it's intended purpose was [it wasn't intended to be used as a laptop... it only lasted about half an hour on battery iirc...]

The laptop I use a work (Dell Precision M6500) is in the "mobile workstation" territory where the battery only last 1.5 hours so UPS is probably the best way of describing their batteries too!

Also wasn't there a motherboard released a while ago with a battery slice on the back-side?
Gradius 3rd June 2013, 18:42 Quote
This can't be really portable. What about the weight? Batteries can weights a TON !
RichCreedy 3rd June 2013, 19:30 Quote
lithium batteries aren't that heavy, compared to NiCad or lead acid.
fluxtatic 4th June 2013, 07:15 Quote
Yeah, seems like more a gimmick than anything - as others have said, you'd be lucky to have time to get all your programs closed and shut down before the battery gave out, at least if you're running more than a single program.

The halfway decent UPSes I buy at work barely last long enough to do that, and the batteries are the size of bricks (granted, they're lead-acid), I can't imagine something 1/10th the size would be comparable.
Bloody_Pete 4th June 2013, 08:40 Quote
If its inside though it'll be operating at much lower voltages, so is possible to do a couple of minutes I suppose.

also modern battery tech is a long way from NiCad of old, the current nanoLiPo are amazing...
phuzz 4th June 2013, 09:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mi1ez
Just hope they can get the software side right...
It's not hard, just tell Windows that it's a battery, and it'll work just like a laptop (clocking down on battery, and automatically shutting down on low battery). This is how APC UPS's work as long as you don't install their terrible software.
Windows has be fine with UPS's since at least XP.
Xlog 4th June 2013, 11:35 Quote
And what about monitor? You can't really save your work then you can't see anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fluxtatic

The halfway decent UPSes I buy at work barely last long enough to do that, and the batteries are the size of bricks (granted, they're lead-acid), I can't imagine something 1/10th the size would be comparable.

"Modified" one UPS at work with 40AH SLA battery (battery is 4 times bigger than UPS :D), lasts ~ 2H, although some cheaper UPS's have tendency to melt down (literally) during prolonged use.
rollo 4th June 2013, 12:12 Quote
Why would a desktop pc need to be portable? What you gonna do move it desk to desk?
Lance 4th June 2013, 12:25 Quote
This would be great at a LAN as well.

I was so embarrassed when my power supply blew at the I-series, taking out my GPU with it, and knocking out 10 desks connected to the fuse it was on. All their machines dropping like flies. If they'd had UPS's they at least could have said goodbye and shut down safely.

What was worse was that it was 2am and we didn't get running again till 9.

Also surely you'd need to power your monitor through the UPS as well for it to be any use?
ferret141 7th June 2013, 11:29 Quote
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