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Zalman FX100 Cube passive heatsink leaks

Zalman FX100 Cube passive heatsink leaks

This image of the FX100 Cube, leaked to FanlessTech, is all we have to go on as to the features of Zalman's impending passive CPU cooler.

The first image of the FX100 Cube, a new passive CPU heatsink from Zalman, has leaked out ahead of an announcement from the company.

Obtained from an unnamed source by fan-free cooling specialist site FanlessTech, the image reveals a beast of a cooler with an unconventional design. A base plate is connected to what appear to be several interconnected fin stacks, likely aluminium, through four copper heat pipes. The centre of the device features a raised surface in a hexagonal mesh, while the corners are rounded and covered over.

With Zalman being tight-lipped on the product until its official unveiling, we're left guessing as to its method of operation. As a fanless cooler - and with nowhere to put a fan, that's a given - the system would appear to be designed to work through a process of convection, drawing cooler air in through its underside and expelling it from the vent on the top.

One thing is clear from the image, however: the FX100 Cube is absolutely massive. The black structure towers over the teeny-tiny base plate, meaning that Zalman is definitely aiming for those with larger than average cases with this model. For those who can spare the room, and who have adequate airflow through their case, the system could offer a silent alternative to the common forced-air cooler.

Its impressive size will have to be matched with equally impressive performance, however. Zalman's products tend to be priced towards the mid- to high-end of the enthusiast market, which means the company will be targeting buyers with higher-than-average processor thermal design profiles (TDPs.) If the passively-operated FX100 can't deal with such powerful chips, it could struggle to sell regardless of how impressive its design may be.

When Zalman feels like offering up some details regarding the FX100 Cube, we'll let you know - but until then, you'll have to settle for the single leaked picture.

18 Comments

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proxess 14th November 2012, 12:21 Quote
That title was a bit misleading. I thought it was a water-cooling system that leaked for some reason.
Maki role 14th November 2012, 12:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Article
designed to work through a process of convention

Convection maybe?

Looks interesting, I'm wondering how they'll achieve a high enough airflow passively to cool higher-end CPUs.
Gareth Halfacree 14th November 2012, 12:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maki role
Convection maybe?
Eerr, quite. Fixed, ta!
Sc0rian 14th November 2012, 13:00 Quote
i was confused by the title too.

FanlessTech, that is a cool website some really cool products posted there.
RichCreedy 14th November 2012, 13:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maki role
Convection maybe?
Eerr, quite. Fixed, ta!

these modern spell checkers that change correctly spelt words are a bitch, lol ;-)
Deders 14th November 2012, 13:42 Quote
What happens to the convection when it's put on it's side like in most cases?
p3n 14th November 2012, 14:03 Quote
Presumably referring to the gas/liquid in the heat pipes with a very low boiling point (not [greatly] affected by gravity).
GeorgeK 14th November 2012, 14:19 Quote
Looks like you're strapping a fridge to your CPU...
ChaosDefinesOrder 14th November 2012, 14:58 Quote
for something that's supposed to rely on passive airflow, why the hell did they block off a significant portion of their air-path?
GuilleAcoustic 14th November 2012, 15:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChaosDefinesOrder
for something that's supposed to rely on passive airflow, why the hell did they block off a significant portion of their air-path?

That's why I prefer the Nofan CR-95 (also available in pure copper)

http://www.hardwarelook.com/images/uploads/REVIEWS/COOLING//Nofan_CR95C/large/8.jpg
Guinevere 14th November 2012, 15:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChaosDefinesOrder
for something that's supposed to rely on passive airflow, why the hell did they block off a significant portion of their air-path?

I don't think they did. I think the 'corner pieces' are there to make it all rigid and appear to maybe to route the heatpipes though?

If anyone call pull this off it's Zalman. Their passive heatpipe cases were state of the art (at the time) and I have a heatpipe cooled PSU of theirs that's been going strong (and cool) for many a moon.
Corky42 14th November 2012, 17:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChaosDefinesOrder
for something that's supposed to rely on passive airflow, why the hell did they block off a significant portion of their air-path?

Because of the same way a chimney works maybe ?, pulling cool air in at the bottom and extracting it at the top
AiA 14th November 2012, 19:22 Quote
I think its hollow and is like what GuilleAcoustic said http://www.hardwarelook.com/images/uploads/REVIEWS/COOLING//Nofan_CR95C/large/8.jpg

but square shaped

o and under that advert is says 'fanless tech' on the picture
Bakes 14th November 2012, 20:02 Quote
'Impressive performance'? By that I hope you mean 'cools the cpu to a level where it won't blow up on stock settings'. Seriously. If they can manage that passively, then that's impressive enough for me.
greigaitken 14th November 2012, 21:05 Quote
bous air cooling from back of motherboard as it bends like crazy
greigaitken 14th November 2012, 21:11 Quote
*bonus
fluxtatic 15th November 2012, 08:32 Quote
I'm no thermal engineer, but like Deders said, how the hell is this supposed to work via convection when it will be sideways in the typical case? Ah, well, I'll wait for the reviews.

Also, keep in mind the TDP of Ivy Bridge tops out at 77W. This might work brilliantly for those and even SB @ 95W. You might want to avoid sticking it on your AMD FX-8350, though ;)
Skippylee 15th November 2012, 11:55 Quote
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