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Kingston launches HyperX Beast DDR3 modules

Kingston launches HyperX Beast DDR3 modules

Kingston's new HyperX Beast, available at speeds up to 2400MHz, features a new, aggressive heatspreader design.

Kingston Technology has announced a new entry in its HyperX memory family: 2400MHz DDR3 memory modules with a new heatspreader design dubbed the HyperX Beast.

Designed, the company claims, for overclockers, modders and hardcore gamers - typically, and not coincidentally, target markets with plenty of disposable income and a desire to dispose of same - the HyperX Beast line is being made available in 8GB, 16GB, 32GB and 64GB kits of two, four or eight modules running at speeds between 1600MHz CL9 and 2400MHz CL11.

'We use the best performance-yielding components to build memory that is capable of achieving high speeds,' claimed Ann Keefe, Kingston's regional director for the UK and Ireland, at the unveiling. 'The name Beast speaks for itself. The modules exemplify high-performance memory with the highest capacities available on the market today and an awesome design that will look great in your system.'

The Beast tagline, aside from appealing to those who like a side helping of testosterone with their RAM, reflects what Kingston describes as an 'aggressive' design to the new heatspreader. The black heatspreder, emblazoned with the Kingston and HyperX logos along with the new Beast moniker, features a curved design to its fins and cut-out areas which look for all the world like a glaring pair of eyes.

While Kingston has been quick to talk about the appearance of the heatspreader, it hasn't provided any details of its performance. Whether the cut-out sections, curbed appearance and gripping claw-like protrusions exist merely to make the modules look good or actually serve a purpose in improving cooling performance over previous-generation HyperX modules, then, remains to be seen.

UK pricing for the modules, which have not yet filtered into the channel, is not yet available - but expect to pay a premium for the branding and 2400MHz support.

6 Comments

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r3loaded 13th November 2012, 12:32 Quote
Why do RAM companies still try to sell super overclocked RAM modules when real-world testing shows no discernible benefit above 1600/1866Mhz?
TheDodoKiller 13th November 2012, 12:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3loaded
Why do RAM companies still try to sell super overclocked RAM modules when real-world testing shows no discernible benefit above 1600/1866Mhz?

Simple. People still buy them.
law99 13th November 2012, 13:27 Quote
Because it's all about the benchmarking
GuilleAcoustic 13th November 2012, 14:27 Quote
Trinity's IGP takes benefit from 2100 MHz memory ... but 2400 doesn't add much.

http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/46073-amd-a10-5800k-trinity-needs-faster-ram/?page=3
Aterius Gmork 13th November 2012, 19:55 Quote
I wish they'd stop using these large heatspreaders. They have almost no benefit but will conflict with most tower coolers
kingosticks 15th November 2012, 13:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aterius Gmork
I wish they'd stop using these large heatspreaders. They have almost no benefit but will conflict with most tower coolers
Agreed. Presumably this is their 2133 MHz part, so it's not being over-clocked and doesn't need anything fancy to cool it.
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