bit-tech.net

AMD launches multi-core cashback programme

AMD launches multi-core cashback programme

AMD's cashback programme runs until the 31st of August and offers up to £20 back on selected four-, six- and eight-core processors.

AMD has announced a cashback incentive for buyers of its multi-core products, with UK and European customers increasingly rewarded for adding more cores to their systems.

The sales incentive sees users given a partial refund on their purchase of qualifying products according to the number of cores: those buying a quad-core chip will given £10, those buying a six-core chip £15, and those splashing out on an eight-core chip £20. For Euro markets, the cashback amounts are €10, €15, and €20 - slightly less than the UK equivalent.

Not all chips qualify for the cashback programme, however. From the company's FX line, the FX-8120 and FX-8150 qualify for the maximum £20 cashback, the FX-6100 and FX-6200 for the £15 cashback, and the FX-4100 and FX-4170 for the bottom-end £10 cashback. Two APUs also qualify for the £10 offer: the A8-3870K and A8-3670K.

The promotion is open until the 31st of August, and comes with a lengthy list of terms and conditions including a limit of two rebates per person, the requirement that the purchase come from an 'authorised eTailer' and a deadline for final claim submissions of the 18th of September 2012. The good news is that purchases dating back to the 11th of June qualify for the cashback offer.

The offer is valid in the UK and in Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal and Sweden. AMD has yet to confirm plans to offer a similar sales incentive elsewhere.

Full details, and a link to the claim form, are available on the official website.

24 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
law99 21st June 2012, 12:41 Quote
0 comments = 0 cares.

Looses I added a care. Nice idea though. Got to make it worth it somehow. Soz to bulldozer owners.
mattbailey 21st June 2012, 13:04 Quote
£20 back for an inferior CPU. Deal breaker. Not!
V3ctor 21st June 2012, 13:41 Quote
So they are paying me to buy their products?...
Just wow...
samkiller42 21st June 2012, 13:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by V3ctor
So they are paying me to buy their products?...
Just wow...

It's a promotion, Similar to HP's cashback offer on their Microserver.

Sam
AcidJiles 21st June 2012, 13:43 Quote
"will be given £10"
Harlequin 21st June 2012, 13:56 Quote
amazing so the comments here are from trolls - who allways troll AMD threads....


looks like AMD are getting ready for a new launch - trinty and piledriver are due soon...
Bogomip 21st June 2012, 14:15 Quote
Oh yeah, my waiting to buy a new CPU until today or tomorrow has earned me £10 :)

Neato :D
law99 21st June 2012, 14:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlequin
amazing so the comments here are from trolls - who allways troll AMD threads....


looks like AMD are getting ready for a new launch - trinty and piledriver are due soon...

Bit of a sweeping statement there. Have you read every post I've ever made? Wasn't long ago I was using amd. And until January had never personally owned an Intel product that wasn't a network card.

Fact is, it's a nice idea, but the cost of them doesn't add up in the first place. It's not all doom and gloom but there is no apparent need to upgrade from a phenom 2 and unlike most New releases, there are more compelling reasons to stay with phenom 2.
Hustler 21st June 2012, 14:42 Quote
Lol...AMD still peddling the lie that these FX chips are 'real' 4,6 & 8 core CPU's.

2,3 & 4 cores with hardware assisted Hyper Threading is the more accurate reality.
V3ctor 21st June 2012, 14:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by law99
... there is no apparent need to upgrade from a phenom 2 and unlike most New releases, there are more compelling reasons to stay with phenom 2.

True... When BD came out, everyone I know that likes AMD bought Phenom 2's or kept theirs... I just think that even with this incentive, these cpu's are too expensive for what they offer. They should have lower prices.
XXAOSICXX 21st June 2012, 17:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
Lol...AMD still peddling the lie that these FX chips are 'real' 4,6 & 8 core CPU's.

2,3 & 4 cores with hardware assisted Hyper Threading is the more accurate reality.

That's not really right is it. What if AMD (or any company) came up with a radically different processor design that didn't use cores (as we understand them) at all? Would you say it had zero cores vs Intel's 4, or 6?

Better still...why don't AMD just say "three-core-with-hardware-assisted-hyperthreading" instead of "6-core" on their packaging and marketing materials? Very catchy, and I'm sure Joe Public will know what that means straight away....or...perhaps they'll do what most people do...look for the bigger number and buy that one.

You can hardly blame AMDs marketing department for calling a processor "6 core" when it's in direct competition with Intel's 6-core offerings and is, for their architecture, the closet equivalent expression.
Sloth 21st June 2012, 18:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
That's not really right is it. What if AMD (or any company) came up with a radically different processor design that didn't use cores (as we understand them) at all? Would you say it had zero cores vs Intel's 4, or 6?

Better still...why don't AMD just say "three-core-with-hardware-assisted-hyperthreading" instead of "6-core" on their packaging and marketing materials? Very catchy, and I'm sure Joe Public will know what that means straight away....or...perhaps they'll do what most people do...look for the bigger number and buy that one.

You can hardly blame AMDs marketing department for calling a processor "6 core" when it's in direct competition with Intel's 6-core offerings and is, for their architecture, the closet equivalent expression.
The whole core thing really is whatever you feel like calling a core, there's no standards agency that'll come by to slap any wrists for AMD's naming convention.

Some things like the Steam Suvey don't even use the term core. Take a peek at the hardware section and you'll see that 45.15% of PCs supposedly have "4 CPUs". I can only imagine how many people have looked at things like that and gone around talking about their quad-CPU system.
misterd77 22nd June 2012, 00:59 Quote
I just bought an A8 K, the rebate means i got the 3870k for just £74, stunning value, im gonna another 2 case fans, and overclock the hell outta it, THANKS AMD
leexgx 22nd June 2012, 03:28 Quote
if you already own an i7 or an phenom 2 an amd bd cpu is not an upgrade (but its not much an downgrade as well)

and need to sort out there bobcat cpus with oem laptop makers using them in full size laptops (15"+) as they are worse then an atom cpu under most cpu loads,

find it hard to recommend an amd laptop as most of them in the UK are the crap bobcat ones they mite have an one or two a8/a6 on show but the discounted i3/5 laptops are cheaper normaly even the dual core celeraon is just an i3 with bits chopped off (lower cache, no HT ) overall does not affect performance much

as to who when some one comes to me asking for good laptop just get laptop with power cable in the side (less likely to be broken off) i3 or i5 as long as its below £400 (sure Intel is doing something with oem to be constantly offering £100-200 off laptops prices )

i can't recommend an amd laptop as i have to explain to much tech jargon to avoid buying an laptop that is 10x slower then there last laptop they had before , bit-tech wish you would pass this onto amd

sorry if it seems an rant but amd need to sort out there oem laptop makers and stop them from using netbook cpu in an big laptop (its what Intel does, they do not allow atom in an laptop bigger then 11-12"i think)
schmidtbag 22nd June 2012, 03:29 Quote
for everyone whining about the whole core thing, i personally just say threads. sure, that's also technically wrong, but its easier to justify.


also, amd's processors are physically the same amount of cores they claim they are. their 8 core cpu does actually have 8 cores, but each pair is tied together.
ssj12 22nd June 2012, 04:33 Quote
no cash back for US and for duel cores? damn, I have a 4600+ that I'd send in since the mobo is shot.
demonisch 22nd June 2012, 08:20 Quote
Sorry for my ignorance, but what exactly is cash back? If you buy their product they will give you £20? Why not just sell it £20 less? I don't understand what is special about cash back (again, sorry for my ignorance if I have the wrong end of the stick).
Gareth Halfacree 22nd June 2012, 08:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by demonisch
Sorry for my ignorance, but what exactly is cash back? If you buy their product they will give you £20? Why not just sell it £20 less? I don't understand what is special about cash back (again, sorry for my ignorance if I have the wrong end of the stick).
It's more common in the US, but is growing in the UK too - it used to be a popular trick for mobile phone sellers, but I think there was a crackdown a while back. The biggest cashback offer in tech at the moment is on HP's Microserver: buy the server for about £250, send your receipt and claim form to HP, and get a cheque for £100 back.

The AMD deal is the same: buy a qualifying CPU, send the receipt and claim form to AMD, receive a cheque (actually, a BACS payment) for up to £20.

Why not just reduce the prices by £20? There are a couple of reasons. The first - and least important - reason is that a blanket drop in RRP requires the cooperation of all your retail partners, some of whom may not be making £20 profit on the chip in the first place. That leaves you - and 'you' here means 'AMD' - with a bunch of ticked-off retail partners who need mollifying, and who may decide to make their next AMD order smaller just in case you pull the same trick again: nobody wants to buy 100,000 units based on an RRP of £100 if you're going to knock it down to £80 a couple of weeks later.

The second - and most important - reason for running a cashback scheme rather than just dropping the price: it's cheaper. You knock £20 off the RRP, and assuming all your retail partners obey, every single chip you sell nets you £20 less. Use a voucher-based cashback scheme, and suddenly your profits increase. Why? Because X% of buyers don't know about the scheme; another X% bought a chip thinking it was included in the offer but it wasn't; another X% lose their receipt before claiming; another X% forget to send in the claim form before the deadline; another X% didn't buy their chip from a 'qualifying eTailer.' The result: a substantial percentage of sales which occur at full retail price, while the company still benefits from increased volumes as a result of the offer.

Yes, it's sneaky.
Amsalpedalb 22nd June 2012, 11:32 Quote
So, does anyone know where the list of 'authorized etailers' is?
XXAOSICXX 22nd June 2012, 12:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Snip

Yep - that's pretty much it. There's also a third and fourth reason for running a cashback scheme (though your second point is still by far the most important)..

3) People like offers. Setting a new lower RRP doesn't scream "this is a special offer" to those who aren't in the know. They'll just see the price for what it is. People like to feel like they're "winning" somehow when they make a transaction. Buying something at the RRP doesn't feel like winning even if the price is cheap to start with.

4) Reducing RRPs in the long term leads to devaluation of the brand. Remember Cyrix CPUs? Yes, they were a load of rubbish, but they were £20. For those who were budget conscious that's a great deal - but it also meant that Cyrix were seen as the "cheaper option" which, like many brands-you've-never-really-heard of get tagged with the "it's cheap so it must be crap" label (and many of them are, of course). Thus, it's better for AMD to be seen to be giving money away (which sounds great) rather than to concede "we're the cheap option, you won't pay much, but don't expect too much either.
Gareth Halfacree 22nd June 2012, 12:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
Yep - that's pretty much it. There's also a third and fourth reason for running a cashback scheme (though your second point is still by far the most important).. <snip>
Those are very true, and there's even a fifth: reduce the RRP, and you don't know who's buying 'em. Make people send in a cashback form, and boom: name, address, bank details, date of purchase, amount paid, other items listed on the receipt... It's a marketer's dream - and you get a far better response rate saying "fill in this intrusive form and we'll give you £20" compared with "fill in this intrusive form and we'll enter you into a secretive prize draw and/or extend your warranty to a point that is still below your basic statutory rights," as seen on most product registration cards.
XXAOSICXX 22nd June 2012, 18:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
Yep - that's pretty much it. There's also a third and fourth reason for running a cashback scheme (though your second point is still by far the most important).. <snip>
Those are very true, and there's even a fifth: reduce the RRP, and you don't know who's buying 'em. Make people send in a cashback form, and boom: name, address, bank details, date of purchase, amount paid, other items listed on the receipt... It's a marketer's dream - and you get a far better response rate saying "fill in this intrusive form and we'll give you £20" compared with "fill in this intrusive form and we'll enter you into a secretive prize draw and/or extend your warranty to a point that is still below your basic statutory rights," as seen on most product registration cards.

Indeed!
Jedibeeftrix 23rd June 2012, 13:12 Quote
sixth - they get to sit on a pile of your cash for a month or so, able to invest it for a return, before giving it back to the 'grateful' customer.
Cthippo 8th July 2012, 14:25 Quote
Frys in the US is bad for this. You have to really read the fine print sometimes to figure out if the advertised price is what you pay, or what it costs you after they mail you the rebate check in 6-8 weeks. Some even require multiple rebates to get to the quoted price. No wonder everyone is buying online!
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums