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Nvidia launches GeForce GT 640 2GB

Nvidia launches GeForce GT 640 2GB

Nvidia's hardware partners have announced retail GeForce GT 640 2GB boards, while the graphics giant itself offers an OEM version.

Nvidia and its multitudinous hardware partners have announced the first mainstream-oriented Kepler graphics family, the GeForce GT 640 2GB.

A cut-down member of the GeForce 600 series, the first GeForce GT 640 card out of the gate - a fairly stock model from Zotac - boasts a Kepler GPU with 384 CUDA cores running at 900MHz, 2GB of DDR3 memory running at 1,782MHz effective on a 128-bit bus, and includes all the functionality you would expect from a 600-series card.

Most of the boards announced include a pair of dual-link DVI-D ports and a single HDMI output, with some adding in VGA either through a dedicated port or a DVI-to-VGA adapter bundled in the box. Fans of DisplayPort, sadly, will have to look elsewhere.

Thanks to its trimmed down GPU and cheaper DDR3 memory, Nvidia is positioning the GeForce GT 640 2GB as being for mainstream consumers who do a bit of gaming and are looking for an affordable upgrade away from integrated graphics systems. Accordingly, the company has focused heavily on the board's multimedia functionality including its hardware-accelerated Full HD video playback, Blu-ray 3D support and lossless audio bitstream capabilities.

That's not to say that Nvidia isn't hoping gamers will be interested in the board: like its bigger brothers, the GeForce GT 640 2GB includes support for multi-monitor gaming through Nvidia Surround and the company's Adaptive Vertical Sync technology, along with the same streaming multiprocessor (SMX) technology as other Kepler boards. Nvidia 3D Vision is also supported, when paired with a certified monitor and a pair of active shutter glasses.

As well as retail boards from its hardware partners, Nvidia has confirmed that it is producing an own-brand board of its own for original equipment manufacturer (OEM) customers. This more than anything indicates Nvidia's desire to convince system builders that an affordable discrete graphics board is a sensible investment, instead of relying on the on-board capabilities of Intel and AMD processors.

The boards have yet to show up in the UK retail channel in significant quantities, but a pre-order page from KSN offers a clue as to pricing at £87.29 including VAT.

19 Comments

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ssj12 6th June 2012, 06:41 Quote
powerful little card there.
TaRkA DaHl 6th June 2012, 07:38 Quote
Might be good to fold on. And single slot by the looks of things.
Harlequin 6th June 2012, 08:38 Quote
6670 is cheaper and faster and the 7750 can be had for the same money (as can the 6850) - nv need to drop the price by £15 at least
feathers 6th June 2012, 08:39 Quote
Adnoctum 6th June 2012, 09:32 Quote
Uses DDR3 instead of GDDR5 and is still too expensive.
Only good thing about it is single slot HSF and no PCIe power connector required, but the HD7750 has both, is the same price (or cheaper!) and smacks it stupid.
Nikumba 6th June 2012, 09:54 Quote
Will there a low pro version?
phuzz 6th June 2012, 10:26 Quote
Even Dell have stopped including DisplayPort in their newer laptops (at least the business ones), so I'm going to call it: DisplayPort is dead.

(I do think the connector is slightly nicer than HDMI, but I've never been able to see the point in it otherwise)
Adnoctum 6th June 2012, 11:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by phuzz
Even Dell have stopped including DisplayPort in their newer laptops (at least the business ones), so I'm going to call it: DisplayPort is dead.

(I do think the connector is slightly nicer than HDMI, but I've never been able to see the point in it otherwise)

HDMI attracts a licensing fee on all devices that uses it. DP does not, and is free.
HDMI includes device restrictions *cough*you're a pirate*cough* that can make it a pain. DP does not.
It is arguable which is better, but my opinion is that HDMI is better for Home Theatre applications (for obvious reasons) and DP is much better for PC purposes.

Is it a Dell Ultrabook you were referring to? I ask because the specifications implemented by Intel on Ultrabooks leave very little room for ports. Many Ultrabooks only have one or two USB ports for example, and so display port options are also going to be limited. If Dell chooses HDMI over DP on an Ultrabook it wouldn't surprise me.
Anfield 6th June 2012, 16:20 Quote
Lol, looking at reviews the 640 really shouldn't be more than 30 - 40£...

Now NVIDIA really needs to bring out a 660 at a competitive price.
ssj12 6th June 2012, 20:47 Quote
So my friend is looking to upgrade his 9800GTX to something Nvidia..... is this faster? Amazon.com has it for $89 currently.
nuc13ar 7th June 2012, 04:51 Quote
Quote:
6670 is cheaper and faster and the 7750 can be had for the same money (as can the 6850) - nv need to drop the price by £15 at least
how so? in what games?!! i bet in gta IV and other nvidia-happy games it isn't... please qualify this comment, tia. 6670 is cheaper, but in gta IV it performs like a 8600gt (my llano - 6550d which has 400 shader cores does anyway). there is no ati card - sans power connector that will beat it @1280x1024 or less...
Quote:
Will there a low pro version?
http://www.club-3d.com/index.php/products/reader.en/product/geforce-gt-640.html

edit:
Quote:
So my friend is looking to upgrade his 9800GTX to something Nvidia..... is this faster?

i asked a coworker to buy this for me (i gave him the cash while we were checking out, as newegg doesn't take money orders anymore).
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125433
wanted to get the fat evga one (gigabyte is so unreliable), but this had an extra vga output. will update after testing...
Elton 7th June 2012, 05:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssj12
So my friend is looking to upgrade his 9800GTX to something Nvidia..... is this faster? Amazon.com has it for $89 currently.

Get a 7750. That should do okay as an upgrade. This probably will equal a 9800GTX. Which coincidentally is still a decent card.
Adnoctum 7th June 2012, 11:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuc13ar
Quote:
6670 is cheaper and faster and the 7750 can be had for the same money (as can the 6850) - nv need to drop the price by £15 at least
how so? in what games?!! i bet in gta IV and other nvidia-happy games it isn't... please qualify this comment, tia. 6670 is cheaper, but in gta IV it performs like a 8600gt (my llano - 6550d which has 400 shader cores does anyway). there is no ati card - sans power connector that will beat it @1280x1024 or less...

You mean that the HD7750 (that doesn't have a power connector and only consumes 20w more than the GT640) isn't faster in a benchmark? Which non-CUDA benchmark is this? The HD7750 is faster in any benchmark you care to provide (in many cases almost TWICE as fast) and is the same price (or sometimes less).

Buying a slower card, for same money because you are enamoured with a particular graphics maker in one game - side-splittingly funny. And without seeing a benchmark for that game - laughing even harder.

BTW the HD7750 runs GTA4 @ 1280x720 at a similar framerate as a GTX550Ti, and the GT640 doesn't beat a GTX550Ti.

The massive flop of the GT640 can be seen at the complete lack of reviews at launch (Tom's is the only one I can find). Far, far too quiet. When was the last time that Nvidia didn't ramp up the media-engine for a product launch? Only when they didn't want anyone to take too much notice.
mclean007 7th June 2012, 11:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnoctum
HDMI attracts a licensing fee on all devices that uses it. DP does not, and is free.
This is true...
Quote:
HDMI includes device restrictions *cough*you're a pirate*cough* that can make it a pain. DP does not.
...but this is not. DisplayPort provides for both HDCP (like HDMI) and its own DisplayPort Content Protection (DPCP) standards - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DisplayPort#DRM

And anyway, I've never actually heard of anyone having real problems with HDCP, except when it was first introduced and not all hardware supported it. Anything you buy nowadays will work fine, and from my experience it is utterly seamless.
jrs77 10th June 2012, 22:19 Quote
I hope that nVidia will pull a GTX660 during the next two or three month with a pricetag of only €200. Otherwise they'll look really bad in the low and mid-power segment and loose every battle to AMD.
Bindibadgi 11th June 2012, 03:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by phuzz
Even Dell have stopped including DisplayPort in their newer laptops (at least the business ones), so I'm going to call it: DisplayPort is dead.

(I do think the connector is slightly nicer than HDMI, but I've never been able to see the point in it otherwise)

DisplayPort is the only connector that can power 2560x1440/1600 monitors with audio, unless you want to use dual-link DVI (not every monitor comes with and only 1 port per graphics card). HDMI cannot - it's limited to 1920x1200 (unless the 1.4b spec allows it? but most 2560 monitors don't have it)
noizdaemon666 11th June 2012, 06:33 Quote
Yeah HDMI does now allow for >1920x1200 resolutions.
Elton 11th June 2012, 08:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by noizdaemon666
Yeah HDMI does now allow for >1920x1200 resolutions.

Well it does, but it needs both a 1.4a output and input. In other words, at this moment in time. No not really.
noizdaemon666 11th June 2012, 10:30 Quote
I was making a general statement about the actual cable :p If you take ports into account then you are quite correct :) I'd still opt for DVI over HDMI regardless though.
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