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AMD launches Brazos 2.0 E-Series APUs

AMD launches Brazos 2.0 E-Series APUs

The new AMD Brazos 2.0 E-Series APUs promise laptop battery life of up to eleven hours, according to AMD's internal testing.

AMD has officially announced the launch of its E-Series Accelerated Processing Units (APUs) for budget-conscious laptop makers looking for extended battery life.

Designed to sit alongside the previously launched Trinity A-series chips, the new Brazos 2.0 chips boast performance improvements in both the CPU and GPU sections, optimisations for Windows 8, and an updated controller hub with on-board USB 3.0 and an integrated SD card reader.

'In 2011, we showed the industry you could get discrete-level GPU power in a notebook without added power consumption or cost, resulting in the most successful notebook platform in AMD’s history,' claimed Chris Cloran, corporate vice president and general manager of AMD's client business unit, at the launch event. 'Today we raise the bar even higher with our latest APU offering. Our 2012 AMD E-Series APU gives consumers a visually superior choice for everyday performance with the latest graphics technology and nearly three hours more battery life than the competition.'

AMD has announced two Brazos 2.0 chips to make up its initial offering: the E2-1800 is a dual-core chip running at 1.7GHz with 1MB of L2 cache and an 80-core Radeon HD 7340 on-board running at 523MHz base and peaking at 680MHz. The cheaper E1-1200 drops to two 1.4GHz cores and an 80-core Radeon HD 7310 running at 500MHz with no turbo functionality. Both models are designed around an 18W thermal design profile (TDP.)

The top-end E2-1800 also boasts AMD's Steady Video Technology, designed to remove camera judder from video files - although this is missing from the E1-1200.

The headlining feature of Brazos 2.0 is its low power draw. According to AMD's measurements, a laptop based around the E1-1200 Brazos 2.0 APU manages 674 minutes of idle battery life while a similar laptop based around Intel's rival Celeron B800 processor managed a mere 496 minutes in the same test. The result: OEMs able to offer 11 hour battery life in budget-friendly laptops.

Both models also include an integrated controller for SD card access along with two USB 3.0 SuperSpeed ports. Additionally, AMD claims that Microsoft's upcoming Windows 8 operating system will include specific optimisations to improve performance on Brazos 2.0 platforms.

Commercial availability has not yet been confirmed, but AMD claims that devices from Acer, Asus, HP, Lenovo, Samsung, Sony and Toshiba will be hitting the market soon.

6 Comments

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Narishma 6th June 2012, 13:33 Quote
More like Brazos 1.1.
azazel1024 6th June 2012, 13:49 Quote
Is the CPU actually improved, or is it simply a clock bump? Don't get me wrong, Atom as it stands in the ULV market sucks...but other than graphics being appreciably better, Brazos frankly is a donkey turd as well. I don't need screaming power...but when the most basic ULV full up Intel CPU can manage something like 2-2.5x the computer power, at barely higher clocks something is wrong with Atoms and Brazos.

Maybe next years Atom on 22nm and an out of order ability will finally deliver something super low power AND with resonable compute ability.
cornelius1729 6th June 2012, 14:02 Quote
I'm quite tempted by one of these for an HTPC. It should playback 1080P video with ease, and the low power draw means you can have it on all the time.
schmidtbag 6th June 2012, 14:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by azazel1024
Is the CPU actually improved, or is it simply a clock bump? Don't get me wrong, Atom as it stands in the ULV market sucks...but other than graphics being appreciably better, Brazos frankly is a donkey turd as well. I don't need screaming power...but when the most basic ULV full up Intel CPU can manage something like 2-2.5x the computer power, at barely higher clocks something is wrong with Atoms and Brazos.

Maybe next years Atom on 22nm and an out of order ability will finally deliver something super low power AND with resonable compute ability.

Not sure what you run but for almost 2 years straight I used a 900MHz Celeron with i945 graphics, and those weren't the bottleneck (although the GPU couldn't handle fullscreen flash videos perfectly). I'd still use the system if I weren't given something that was better.


At this point I forget which was worse - the original Brazos or Zacate. But whichever was the better one was a pretty decent CPU. However, ARM is generally a better choice no matter which company you look at.
p3n 6th June 2012, 19:05 Quote
Better than Celeron worst marketing claim ever?
maverik-sg1 7th June 2012, 20:18 Quote
I am a massive fan of the Brazo's chips, I think they tick all the right boxes for it's target market and this new revision will only cement their position for that....... some peopel here appear to of had a bad experience or have taken an oppositie position to me - but my experience in a HTPC has been nothing short of delightful, blu-ray, HD playback even some games and multi tasking, it's always punched above my personal expectations, with low enough, price, noise, heat and power consumption.

With the Piledriver based cores I don't get it - the last time I tried to make sense of AMD's definition of Dual core or quad core what I was actually hearing was they are like highly optimised single or dual cores blended with a co-processor.

So whilst the the core count may in fact be 2 or 4 they are 1 or 2x x86 cores and 1 or 2 hybrid cores....... thats not to say the architecture is not only innovative but also a viable future of core design, but it does make the labelling and comparison against Intel cpu's a little difficult.

I'd like to see a win7 versus win8 performance comparison on any/all piledriver based cores...
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