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Raspberry Pi goes on sale - briefly

Raspberry Pi goes on sale - briefly

The Raspberry Pi is in great demand, with both RS and Farnell's website struggling to keep up with the traffic.

The Raspberry Pi single-board computer officially went on sale this morning, only to sell out within an hour due to unprecedented demand.

The ARM-based microcomputer, the size of a credit card and costing just $35 in its most powerful 'Model B' incarnation, is now being produced under licence by Premier Farnell and RS Components rather than purely by the Raspberry Pi charity itself.

'The involvement of RS Components and Premier Farnell means that we can build volume much, much faster than would have been possible on our own,' a spokesperson for the project explains. 'We are no longer limited to batches of only 10k Raspberry Pis; the Raspberry Pi will now be built to match demand.

'Both Premier Farnell and RS Components have worldwide distribution networks, so wherever you are in the world, you will be able to buy from a local distributor. This will saves you money on shipping; it’s a much better way for you to buy than getting them all shipped from the Foundation in the UK.'

Raspberry Pi announced the opening of orders for both RS and Farnell on its website at 0600 this morning; at 0602, both third-party websites had been driven offline by traffic as gadget-hungry fans tried to place their orders.

An hour later, Farnell confirmed that despite its website being offline for the majority of users it had managed to sell out of its initial production run of Raspberry Pi boards. RS, meanwhile, is delaying opening orders at all until later this week in a last-minute decision that will hopefully give the company time to bolster its servers in anticipation of the traffic hit.

The - brief - opening of orders also brought a welcome surprise: the cheaper 'Model A' unit, costing just $25, is to receive a memory upgrade from 128MB to 256MB at no extra cost when it enters production later this year. As a result it will match the specifications of the more expensive 'Model B,' missing only the additional USB port and Ethernet connectivity.

If you're anxious to get your hands on a Pi, RS is asking for email addresses ahead of the orders opening later in the week. Farnell, meanwhile, is allowing customers to pre-order the device now with a new batch to be built within 16 days - but at the time of writing, its website is still suffering under the strain.

76 Comments

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Lord Badger 29th February 2012, 14:23 Quote
Good to see it's launch as such a success. Lots of press coverage. Although a lot of the media seems to be saying it has WiFi when it doesn't
Stewb 29th February 2012, 14:24 Quote
Why did it launch at such an antisocial hour, and without any notification to those on the mailing list? :(
BLC 29th February 2012, 14:25 Quote
In case you are so desperate that the temptation arises, please do not try to buy a Raspberry Pi from anywhere else - especially ebay. The only legitimate sources for a Raspberry Pi are RS and Farnell. Anyone else is either a fraudster or a ripoff merchant: either they're selling something they don't have and will never send to you, or they're selling on a board that they have ordered and not yet received at an inflated price.

That said, I'm not quite as desperate to get one; now that they're no longer limited to production runs of 10,000 units at a time, it should be far easier to meet demand. For what it's worth, the foundation were reporting that Farnell had sold out by 0627 - only 27 minutes after launch...

I've been up since 0540 this morning to follow this launch and I feel knackered; I have no idea what the Raspberry Pi team must be going through, but I think it's safe to say that they've all earned a pint (or twelve) when they finally finish for the day!
BLC 29th February 2012, 14:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewb
Why did it launch at such an antisocial hour, and without any notification to those on the mailing list? :(

There are over 100,000 people on the mailing list, so there were major problems getting the emails out; you aren't alone in not receiving the email. But the email didn't say anything more than the announcement on the website anyway.

The reason for the antisocial hour is presumably so that everyone interested has a good chance of getting one no matter what time zone they're in. If it launched at 1000GMT, that'd be between 0300 and 0500 for the US.
Vo0Ds 29th February 2012, 14:36 Quote
Looks like it's going to be a bit hit! Was up before 6AM along with a lot of other people, but alas, it wasn't meant to be.
Phil Rhodes 29th February 2012, 14:56 Quote
Today wasn't really the time to go and order some connectors from Farnell, was it...

What the hell are you actually supposed to do with a Raspberry Pi, anyway? I've yet to see that there's actually any software for it.

F*&#$ing linux-powered, penguin-poking, Farnell-offlining piece of (#$!...

Mutter, grumble.
Picarro 29th February 2012, 14:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Today wasn't really the time to go and order some connectors from Farnell, was it...

What the hell are you actually supposed to do with a Raspberry Pi, anyway? I've yet to see that there's actually any software for it.

F*&#$ing linux-powered, penguin-poking, Farnell-offlining piece of (#$!...

Mutter, grumble.

Power cable, ethernet cable and HDMi cable

Then you install RaspBMC and watch movies on your 1080p capable mini computer.
BLC 29th February 2012, 15:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Today wasn't really the time to go and order some connectors from Farnell, was it...

What the hell are you actually supposed to do with a Raspberry Pi, anyway? I've yet to see that there's actually any software for it.

F*&#$ing linux-powered, penguin-poking, Farnell-offlining piece of (#$!...

Mutter, grumble.

The Debian root filesystem has already been uploaded - last week - and a Fedora distro is expected imminently. Both distros already have a large library of ARM software available - particularly Debian.

What are you supposed to do with it? Well, what are you supposed to do with any other computer?
Hustler 29th February 2012, 15:02 Quote
[QUOTE=BLC]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewb

If it launched at 1000GMT, that'd be between 0300 and 0500 for the US.

Do you think if it was a US company, they would have shown similar consideration to potential purchasers outside their home market?

..somehow i doubt it.
BLC 29th February 2012, 15:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler

Do you think if it was a US company, they would have shown similar consideration to potential purchasers outside their home market?

..somehow i doubt it.

Probably not, but this isn't a profit making company - it's a charitable foundation. Besides, even if no-one else in the world would have done this, that doesn't mean that they shouldn't hold themselves to higher standards.
Bauul 29th February 2012, 15:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Today wasn't really the time to go and order some connectors from Farnell, was it...

What the hell are you actually supposed to do with a Raspberry Pi, anyway? I've yet to see that there's actually any software for it.

F*&#$ing linux-powered, penguin-poking, Farnell-offlining piece of (#$!...

Mutter, grumble.

The Debian root filesystem has already been uploaded - last week - and a Fedora distro is expected imminently. Both distros already have a large library of ARM software available - particularly Debian.

What are you supposed to do with it? Well, what are you supposed to do with any other computer?

Exactly, you're supposed to do whatever you want to do with the Pi.

The only difference between it and any other desktop is it's tiny and cheap, so it lends itself to tinkering, coding and modding.
Stelph 29th February 2012, 15:30 Quote
[QUOTE=Picarro]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
What the hell are you actually supposed to do with a Raspberry Pi, anyway? I've yet to see that there's actually any software for it.

A cheap AppleTV/Airplay receiver?

http://www.neowin.net/news/35-raspberry-pi-pc-hacked-to-stream-airplay-video
b8birmingham 29th February 2012, 16:05 Quote
Windows 8 Preview today too ? Windows on arm will it work anyone ?
Bazz 29th February 2012, 16:35 Quote
I tried to get one at 8AM this morning from Farnell (through work) and they are out of stock until late April now.
Luckily I have started looking at other products, so they might have missed a few customers already.

Badly organized, badly distributed
KidMod-Southpaw 29th February 2012, 16:58 Quote
Damn it! Why do I have to go to school?
Phil Rhodes 29th February 2012, 17:14 Quote
Quote:
The Debian root filesystem has already been uploaded

Wow! A killer application and no mistake! Where else can I get a computer that has, crikey, a filesystem? Sign me up!
BLC 29th February 2012, 17:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Quote:
The Debian root filesystem has already been uploaded
Wow! A killer application and no mistake! Where else can I get a computer that has, crikey, a filesystem? Sign me up!

You conveniently forgot to also quote the part of my post that mentions that there's already a large amount of ARM applications already available through Debian - which actually takes more effort than just clicking the "Quote" button and quoting the whole post.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
The Debian root filesystem has already been uploaded - last week - and a Fedora distro is expected imminently. Both distros already have a large library of ARM software available - particularly Debian.

If you're not interested then move right along - there's no need to be an ass about it.
Showerhead 29th February 2012, 17:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Wow! A killer application and no mistake! Where else can I get a computer that has, crikey, a filesystem? Sign me up!
I think you are completely missing the point of this system.
Phil Rhodes 29th February 2012, 17:45 Quote
What I'm trying to do here is highlight the dismaying tendency of linux people to get all wound up and excited over the utterly trivial.

Not that a filesystem is a trivial bit of software engineering, but it isn't an application. Nobody buys a PC so they can use its filesystem.

I ask again: what can this thing actually do?
steveo_mcg 29th February 2012, 17:50 Quote
Seriously Phil if you aren't interested then why do you troll on any thread that mentions Linux?


http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=XBMC+on+raspbery+pi
http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=quake+3+on+raspberry+pi
Phil Rhodes 29th February 2012, 17:55 Quote
I don't, not intentionally, but I suppose since you ask it's a good idea that people are warned of the problems that are likely to exist.

The Quake example is sort of what I mean, though: it's another instance of Linux people getting very excited about doing something everyone else considered trivial ten years ago.
BLC 29th February 2012, 17:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
What I'm trying to do here is highlight the dismaying tendency of linux people to get all wound up and excited over the utterly trivial.

Not that a filesystem is a trivial bit of software engineering, but it isn't an application. Nobody buys a PC so they can use its filesystem.

I ask again: what can this thing actually do?

I think we're mixing up terminology. The Debian "root filesystem" I refer to is actually the Debian SD card image - that is, a complete distribution of Debian ready to be imaged to an SD card. A Fedora distribution is also on the way very soon.

It is a single-board computer based on a Broadcom ARM processor, with 256MB of RAM, 2x USB ports, composite video, HDMI and 3.5mm audio output. It is a computer. All one needs is an operating system on an SD card and it is identical to any other desktop running Linux.

The point is that this is not something trivial; this computer can handle the vast majority of desktop tasks that the vast majority of users need for $35. This first release may be targeted at "linux people", but it is not the end of the line for this product.
BLC 29th February 2012, 17:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
The Quake example is sort of what I mean, though: it's another instance of Linux people getting very excited about doing something everyone else considered trivial ten years ago.

But can you do it on a system the size of a credit card that runs on a 5v power supply, which can also decode 1080p h.264 video at full resolution with no loss of frames?

That's why people are excited.
Phil Rhodes 29th February 2012, 18:05 Quote
I'd be quite excited if it could encode h.264 video in realtime, but I suspect it can't, because the only reason it'll be able to do the decode is because it's got some sort of hardware assist. I suppose you could plug one of those USB h.264 input devices into it, and... oh yes, linux and modern devices, drivers... forget I mentioned it...
BLC 29th February 2012, 18:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I suppose you could plug one of those USB h.264 input devices into it, and... oh yes, linux and modern devices, drivers... forget I mentioned it...

The agenda shines through; you know, you could have saved yourself an awful lot of time if you'd just said "LOL LINUX SUXXORZ!!ROFL!" right at the start.

Clearly you have utterly no interest in the Raspberry Pi and are now just trolling. I'm not going to waste any more time debating the matter with you.

http://xkcd.com/386/
Stewb 29th February 2012, 18:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
There are over 100,000 people on the mailing list, so there were major problems getting the emails out; you aren't alone in not receiving the email. But the email didn't say anything more than the announcement on the website anyway.

The reason for the antisocial hour is presumably so that everyone interested has a good chance of getting one no matter what time zone they're in. If it launched at 1000GMT, that'd be between 0300 and 0500 for the US.

You seem to be missing the point :p

I had no idea it was launching because I used the mailing list to save me having to check the website for updates ;)
CozaMcCoza 29th February 2012, 18:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I'd be quite excited if it could encode h.264 video in realtime, but I suspect it can't, because the only reason it'll be able to do the decode is because it's got some sort of hardware assist. I suppose you could plug one of those USB h.264 input devices into it, and... oh yes, linux and modern devices, drivers... forget I mentioned it...

It's $35 for flip's sake. What do you expect it to do? The fact it's $35 and can decode h.264 is a pretty good feat!
JY_OC_HX 29th February 2012, 18:27 Quote
I've had a scan through this post and can't believe no one has mentioned farnells profiteering. £26 and rs are listing it at only £21 and change. In an ideal world RPi would have been able to put anyone who has bought one just to sell on ebay before a firing squad
Mikee 29th February 2012, 18:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by JY_OC_HX
I've had a scan through this post and can't believe no one has mentioned farnells profiteering. £26 and rs are listing it at only £21 and change.

Pretty sure Farnell's price included shipping where the RS one did not.

Raspberry Pi Twitter
Aracos 29th February 2012, 18:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I'd be quite excited if it could encode h.264 video in realtime, but I suspect it can't, because the only reason it'll be able to do the decode is because it's got some sort of hardware assist. I suppose you could plug one of those USB h.264 input devices into it, and... oh yes, linux and modern devices, drivers... forget I mentioned it...
Are you actually serious? Why don't you tell us all how much it would take to build a system that could encode H.264 at a high quality profile in real time.

Also you can tell you are a generic troll just from your attitude of linux being completely incompatible with modern devices.
Ending Credits 29th February 2012, 18:46 Quote
So has anyone here actually managed to get hold of one?
Harksar 29th February 2012, 20:53 Quote
Are you kidding me? Work all day, hoping to get an order in when I come back and it's all sold out? Anyone have any idea when it will be on sale again? Are they manufacturing more now or will they wait until the 'Educational release date'?
adidan 29th February 2012, 20:54 Quote
What are you supposed to do with it? Learn to code practically at a budget price, that's what it's designed for.
Jaybles 29th February 2012, 21:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidMod-Southpaw
Damn it! Why do I have to go to school?

Because you're an infant. :P
lancer778544 29th February 2012, 21:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ending Credits
So has anyone here actually managed to get hold of one?

Looks like this guy might have: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Raspberry-Pi-Model-B-confirmed-shipping-date-/130656922987?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item1e6bc26d6b#ht_500wt_966

Quite a mark up at £50...

I'm actually quite surprised that it's the only one on ebay at the moment.
Sloth 29th February 2012, 23:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler


Do you think if it was a US company, they would have shown similar consideration to potential purchasers outside their home market?

..somehow i doubt it.
Even 0600 GMT is between 1000 and 0100 in the continental US this time of year, just as problematic for many working people. If anything I'd be looking at those to the East of GMT as having gotten the best deal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
But can you do it on a system the size of a credit card that runs on a 5v power supply, which can also decode 1080p h.264 video at full resolution with no loss of frames?

That's why people are excited.
I was very much in Phil's boat for awhile. People were going on about it being a great learning tool and how you can learn coding and such. To be honest it made me lose interest, not into coding and it all sounded like a fair deal of work. Then I learned about its media playing capabilities and suddenly was quite excited. Not quite as multi-purpose as my m-ITX HTPC but a fair deal cheaper and smaller.
Adnoctum 29th February 2012, 23:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I don't, not intentionally, but I suppose since you ask it's a good idea that people are warned of the problems that are likely to exist.

The Quake example is sort of what I mean, though: it's another instance of Linux people getting very excited about doing something everyone else considered trivial ten years ago.

What I don't get is why are you complaining and whining about it NOT being something it clearly isn't? So you aren't interested and don't find it useful? Congratulations on your promotion to Phil Rhodes: Global Usefulness Expert On Everything.

The fact that in the time I took to read the article I had thought of three useful things that *I* could use a 700MHz ARM-based computer that draws 3.5W for, says that there is a market for them beyond Phil Rhodes: Global Usefulness Expert On Everything.

Also, there are people on the planet who don't need OS, drivers and software supplied to them in neat little .exe packages with friendly wizards, simple step-by-step instructions and a reassuring hand to hold on to.

(Sometimes, you just need to use Rhetorical Weapons of Mass Sarcasm in a post. Sorry about that. That was sarcasm too.)
MiNiMaL_FuSS 29th February 2012, 23:18 Quote
I intend to buy one as a completely silent and low power Torrent box - plug in a decent sized usb drive and you have the perfect download system to leave on 24/7.
Phil Rhodes 29th February 2012, 23:31 Quote
Quote:
Also, there are people on the planet who don't need OS, drivers and software supplied to them in neat little .exe packages with friendly wizards, simple step-by-step instructions and a reassuring hand to hold on to.

Yes, but they're not really the sort of people at whom this seems to be aimed. I mean, it's supposed to be about teaching kids to code, right?

I can't describe how much this is exactly not the way to do that.
Assassin8or 29th February 2012, 23:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes

Yes, but they're not really the sort of people at whom this seems to be aimed. I mean, it's supposed to be about teaching kids to code, right?

I can't describe how much this is exactly not the way to do that.

You're quite an ass, and if you'd had something like this as a kid such as the Amiga/BBC Micro you might actually be interested. As it turns out, you're probably either too young to remember those platforms, or too old to have been at school when they were actually used to teach kids programming; or unfortunate enough to go to a school where they didn't really have computers and IT, if taught, was done on a white/blackboard.

I, personally am looking forward to getting one of these. I plan on running, one or more websites off of one or more of these from home. But then I work for a web development house as a systems admin that covers Windows servers and PCs as well as Linux servers.

I tinker because that's what school got me to do when I was younger; it developed my inquisitive streak towards IT.
mi1ez 1st March 2012, 00:44 Quote
Stream video and music from NAS? for 35quid? Win!
Guinevere 1st March 2012, 02:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I can't describe how much this is exactly not the way to do that.

You don't think a hardware platform affordable enough for it to be "one per child" in the class room and achievable for most parents to pick up for their interested kids combined with a framework of software, documentation and training that is specifically aimed at teaching kids to code is the way to go?

There's been purely software based methods before, but this is more hands on. I say it's a pretty good idea worth pursuing and for the cost... bargain!

But why don't you enlighten us with the solution you've made available to the public? You do have a better option you've developed yourself right?
SexyHyde 1st March 2012, 02:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I am a troll, please don't feed me!

LISTEN TO PHIL!

I know Phil is a troll but maybe he is right. you know what exactly is this tiny piece of cheap hardware going to do? like most people on the planet will need something way more powerful than this, after all most people use really demanding programs like a web browser or word processor and stream movies over the internet. These people will be better off going to PC World and buying a proper computer because its not like everyone has an LCD with HDMI socket and even if they did why would they want something that could save them up front costs of buying a PC and constant saving on energy. Everyone has loads of money. Seriously people listen to Phil, if they even ever made these they would just end up on a shelf gathering dust. NO ONE would buy one.
Siskodata 1st March 2012, 07:33 Quote
Ok for all you bit-tech modding fans look at this wonder:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Custom-case-Raspberry-Pi-Model-B-professional-Recycled-/290677470826?pt=UK_Computing_DesktopComponents_RL&hash=item43adba366a

It must be put in the March edition of "Project Log and Case Mod Index update"
BLC 1st March 2012, 07:44 Quote
Before people go too wild about media playback capability, remember that the main processor is only 700MHz and it's only h.264 video at the moment that will have hardware accelerated playback. It's still damned impressive, but standard-def and other codecs may not fare too well; we'll have to wait and see how well RaspBMC is optimised/matures.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lancer778544
Looks like this guy might have: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Raspberry-Pi-Model-B-confirmed-shipping-date-/130656922987?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item1e6bc26d6b#ht_500wt_966

Quite a mark up at £50...

I'm actually quite surprised that it's the only one on ebay at the moment.

Because the foundation and it's many supporters are working their backsides off to get the auctions pulled. No one can sell one on ebay, because no one actually has one in their hands yet.
mclean007 1st March 2012, 08:10 Quote
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Raspberry-Pi-Model-B-ARM-700MHz-256MB-RAM-Credit-Card-Size-Computer-1080p-Player-/170793934499?pt=UK_Computing_DesktopPCs&hash=item27c41c9ea3

Seriously?! 80 quid?! And last time I checked, a 2 year warranty shouldn't cost more than the hardware it covers! Still, at least the seller is generous enough to give free shipping, the profiteering goon.
mclean007 1st March 2012, 08:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
Because the foundation and it's many supporters are working their backsides off to get the auctions pulled. No one can sell one on ebay, because no one actually has one in their hands yet.
I don't believe the eBay rules prohibit selling goods that are on order, however.
Nexxo 1st March 2012, 09:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Yes, but they're not really the sort of people at whom this seems to be aimed. I mean, it's supposed to be about teaching kids to code, right?

I can't describe how much this is exactly not the way to do that.

I'll just leave this here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
The point of aiming it initially at nerds & techy types now is that those nerds & techy types are going to be the ones that write all the cool software for it and come up with all the cool ideas. The foundation doesn't have enough time or resources to build everything in-house; it's not that they're deliberately crowd-sourcing all the work (I'd say they've already put in their fair share of work, especially today), but an army of enthusiastic nerds, developers, modders, tinkerers, etc, can achieve far more in a short space of time than they could. Long before a release date was even hinted at, people had already set up qemu and virtual machines to start porting code to these devices.

Later this year it will go on "general" sale and they'll start targeting the academic markets. At which time, it will also be released with any number of bundled extras: case (they're aiming at no extra cost for a case), PSU, cheap peripherals, SD cards pre-loaded with OS distributions, cheap USB mice/keyboards... The idea is that mum, dad & schools don't have to buy machines costing several hundred just for their kids to tinker with and potentially break. And we nerds get the benefit of a cheap, powerful computer with loads of potential.

To be honest, I'm just glad that this wasn't a pie in the sky venture and that they are actually here.

BLC is right. By the end of this year there will be so much cool homegrown software for it, that 5-year olds can build code on it with virtual Lego blocks representing operands and variables. There will be a host of snap-on modules. It will be just like the Arduino, and then some.

Phil, son, I is disappoint. You are undoubtedly much more knowledgable on computer programming than I am, but your vision-fu is weak.
will_123 1st March 2012, 10:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I suppose you could plug one of those USB h.264 input devices into it, and... oh yes, linux and modern devices, drivers... forget I mentioned it...

The agenda shines through; you know, you could have saved yourself an awful lot of time if you'd just said "LOL LINUX SUXXORZ!!ROFL!" right at the start.

Clearly you have utterly no interest in the Raspberry Pi and are now just trolling. I'm not going to waste any more time debating the matter with you.

http://xkcd.com/386/

+1

I think OpenBSD will also run on this im sure it supports ARM. Cant wait to have a fiddle with one. And yes it is trivial in some ways, but i don't give a damn its what i like doing!
Risky 1st March 2012, 10:24 Quote
It would be great if some kids learned to write stuff for this device and it would be great if they also played around with Visual Studio & SQL Server Express on a PC. I can't see why anyone would want to rubbish either option.
Guinevere 1st March 2012, 11:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SexyHyde
what exactly is this tiny piece of cheap hardware going to do?

Get normal people talking about teaching kids to code? Maybe even get the product featured a few times on the front page of BBC News? Getting the word out that the UK used to be #1 when it came to "teaching kids to code" , and all it takes is a bit of forward thinking and balls to get people focussed.

You ever seen this happen with something like Scratch or Alice?
BLC 1st March 2012, 13:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Risky
It would be great if some kids learned to write stuff for this device and it would be great if they also played around with Visual Studio & SQL Server Express on a PC. I can't see why anyone would want to rubbish either option.

The only trouble with using Microsoft software is that it's quite expensive; although educational institutions get a big discount, it's still a big extra cost - plus there's the indirect cost of ensuring that your licenses are always up to date. Part of the point of using open source software is that the licensing is so much easier and in many cases there's no cost at all. I'm not rubbishing Visual Studio or SQL Server because it is very useful, espcially in the workplace - I write quite a bit of VB and now SQL at work, but wouldn't have any need for Python; I even use Visual Studio at home for my own use. But the aim I think is more fundamental than teaching someone a specific language.

Once you wrap your head round programming concepts - variables, functions, algorithms, abstraction, etc, etc - you can apply that knowledge to almost any language. That's where the foundation believes that the problem lies: fewer kids are introduced to even the very basic concepts of writing code. Many of the founding members are also professors/staff at Cambridge University, and they have seen students apply to Computer Science degrees that have never even seen any code before.

Before I get flamed to death, I'm not trying to start a "My programming language/operating system is better than yours" argument. Each language - as well as OS - has its advantages and disadvantages, and some are better suited to particular tasks than others are. I wouldn't run Linux if I want to play Skyrim, but I wouldn't run Windows on a lightweight machine; similarly I wouldn't write MI systems in work in prolog.
kosch 1st March 2012, 13:18 Quote
Mine arrived in the post this morning. I heated in the Microwave, covered it in cream and took a bite. Didnt taste very nice. Wont be doing any more food shopping at RS.
steveo_mcg 1st March 2012, 13:49 Quote
Fool! Its oven bake only!
BLC 1st March 2012, 14:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo_mcg
Fool! Its oven bake only!

Yeah, a reflow oven, maybe!
Risky 1st March 2012, 15:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
The only trouble with using Microsoft software is that it's quite expensive; although educational institutions get a big discount, it's still a big extra cost - plus there's the indirect cost of ensuring that your licenses are always up to date.

I can't see where MS are changing schools to use VS Express when it's free to the rest of us. Actually as far as I can see with DreamSpark they can get VS Pro and a load of other stuff for free.
Alhard 1st March 2012, 16:02 Quote
I don't understand how so many people can be so negative about this. Can it really do any harm? It will give children the opportunity to make maths skills applicable at their are to more than just 'Do I have enough for those sweets?'
This may fail but the fact is a charitable organisation has made a step forward which other institutions can learn from. What we might see other subjects getting similar fantastically priced teaching tools thanks to the success of the Pi.

Anyone who is arrogant enough to believe it's a bad idea when it hasn't been tried since a true availability of cheap computing, I invite you to draw up curriculum that will teach kids useful skills whilst keeping them engaged.
Unicorn 1st March 2012, 16:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by kosch
Mine arrived in the post this morning. I heated in the Microwave, covered it in cream and took a bite. Didnt taste very nice. Wont be doing any more food shopping at RS.
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo_mcg
Fool! Its oven bake only!
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
Yeah, a reflow oven, maybe!

HAHA, reflow oven! ISWYDT :)

On another note; You got one kosch?! Have you got it running yet? Any first impressions?
Phil Rhodes 1st March 2012, 16:20 Quote
Quote:
those nerds & techy types are going to be the ones that write all the cool software for it

The rest of the open source community has failed more or less completely to create software that is usable by anyone other than nerds and techy types. I don't see why releasing a small cheap computer will create a situation where open source software is suddenly suitable for "mum, dad & schools".
Risky 1st March 2012, 16:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I don't see why releasing a small cheap computer will create a situation where open source software is suddenly suitable for "mum, dad & schools".

Neither do I but what has this got to do with anything? the point of the devise was something where some kids will learn to do some low-level programming.
SexyHyde 1st March 2012, 21:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
I don't see why releasing a small cheap computer will create a situation where open source software is suddenly suitable for "mum, dad & schools".

Oi Troll!

Open source is perfectly suitable for 'mum,dad & schools' as they only use web browsers and word processors and not much else. Oh and open source OS's have these too, they arent windows exclusives. You can't see the point of anything tho can you troll, but everyone buying these things seem to see something. for the amount of demand i'd say there are numerous possibilities to use these.

Right, now i'll look after your bridge because i know you get antsy about goats and you can go have a play with a recent linux distro, you know so you'll be a bit more educated rather than spouting out the same troll tripe.
BLC 1st March 2012, 21:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Risky
I can't see where MS are changing schools to use VS Express when it's free to the rest of us. Actually as far as I can see with DreamSpark they can get VS Pro and a load of other stuff for free.

But the machine you're going to need to run that will cost more than $35 (+shipping/VAT/tax) and even with a discount for educational institutions, I doubt the license cost per copy of Windows would be that low.

Like I said, I'm not trying to turn this into an OS/programming language war. What's important is getting kids/young people interested and being able to do it at a low cost.
Nexxo 1st March 2012, 22:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
The rest of the open source community has failed more or less completely to create software that is usable by anyone other than nerds and techy types. I don't see why releasing a small cheap computer will create a situation where open source software is suddenly suitable for "mum, dad & schools".

Sure, kid.
yodasarmpit 1st March 2012, 22:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Sure, kid.
Dear god, don't feed it!!!
Guinevere 1st March 2012, 23:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
The only trouble with using Microsoft software is that it's quite expensive

Oh come on... it's not the "only" thing wrong with it1
Risky 2nd March 2012, 10:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLC
But the machine you're going to need to run that will cost more than $35 (+shipping/VAT/tax) and even with a discount for educational institutions, I doubt the license cost per copy of Windows would be that low.

Like I said, I'm not trying to turn this into an OS/programming language war. What's important is getting kids/young people interested and being able to do it at a low cost.


Sure but there is plenty of PC hardware around in schools. This is not going to change that.

This is a new direction and it's a great direction too, but it does not mean that we should encorage learning at high level as well as low level.
sixfootsideburns 2nd March 2012, 19:38 Quote
this discussion is hilarious lol
LordPyrinc 3rd March 2012, 08:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sixfootsideburns
this discussion is hilarious lol

+1

I've lost track of how many times posts/replies have made me laugh.

As for the actual subject of the article, I'm considering purchasing one whenever they get the supply issues straightened out. The potential uses of it for such a low price point are awesome. Low power consumption and size are also huge pluses in my opinion.
GravitySmacked 3rd March 2012, 13:39 Quote
I received an email allowing me to pre-order over at http://uk.farnell.com; looking forward to receiving one of these bad boys, it's been a long wait.
nuc13ar 3rd March 2012, 15:07 Quote
kudos to the people who created it. maybe we can get some of those at a retailer over here. i applaud the noble sentiments of the people who created this device.
si93 3rd March 2012, 16:17 Quote
I've preordered at Farnell and got a estimated delivery date for the 24th April. Does anyone know whether this eta is a variable date dependant on when you placed your pre order or just a date for all pre orders?
scrumble 5th March 2012, 13:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SexyHyde
after all most people use really demanding programs like a web browser or word processor and stream movies over the internet. These people will be better off going to PC World and buying a proper computer because its not like everyone has an LCD with HDMI socket and even

Not arguing on Phils side here, as I do see the point for the Pi, but shirley anyone who uses a pc purely for surfing the net, streaming video etc; isn't going to have the slightest interest in a barebones board like this.

Currently its a geek toy, which will lead to something more main stream, as per the foundations own statement.
Risky 6th March 2012, 13:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by si93
I've preordered at Farnell and got a estimated delivery date for the 24th April. Does anyone know whether this eta is a variable date dependant on when you placed your pre order or just a date for all pre orders?

I also preordered there on Saturday and the shipping date has just moved to May.
GravitySmacked 6th March 2012, 14:03 Quote
Mine has also moved to May, oh well patience is a virtue and all that..
goldstar0011 6th March 2012, 14:07 Quote
Enjoying this thread

I have 2 young step brothers, one is aged 8 and he's really into science and technology, he's always building stuff with lego, mechanco and has his own tool kit for kids.

He's really good with general computer stuff, as he grows up and has access to a cheap powerful computer like that, he could creat things we can't even think off.

Thats the idea, a new generation making original ideas!

I know when website making was not something you could do easily, I was up all night playing with code and scripts, pretty sure they'll be tons of teens doing the same with these.
GravitySmacked 7th March 2012, 14:30 Quote
Update on the pushed back orders:

Has your March/April order just been pushed back to May? Read this!

We’ve had a lot of people mail us and tweet about this today. If you were expecting a March/April delivery and got an email from Element14/Premier Farnell this morning saying delivery had been pushed back, please don’t despair: it appears to be a mistake. We’ve contacted Farnell about it and they’ve come back to say they’ve added this to their Raspberry Pi FAQ:

Update on the pushed back orders:

Q: I got an email from Farnell element14 stating that my delivery date for the Raspberry Pi I ordered is now into May or June, is this correct?

A: Sorry! We updated the data in our system so that new customers placing their pre-order would be advised of the delivery date at the end of May or beginning of June. If you originally had an estimated delivery date in March or April, your delivery estimate is still as per the original communication.

http://www.raspberrypi.org/
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