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Rumours point to Ivy Bridge delay

Rumours point to Ivy Bridge delay

Intel's upcoming Ivy Bridge 22nm processors could be hard to come by at launch, according to sources at laptop OEMs and ODMs.

Unnamed sources have claimed that Intel's Ivy Bridge schedule has slipped, with the chip giant now planning to postpone mass shipments in favour of a paper launch.

According to industry rumour-monger DigiTimes, Intel has been alerting its original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and original design manufacturer (ODM) partners to a delay in availability for its 22nm next-generation Ivy Bridge processors.

Although the official launch is still expected to occur in April, unnamed sources at laptop manufacturers claim to have been warned not to expect production volumes of the chips until after June.

The reason, it is claimed, is inventory: currently, the supply chain is flooded with second-generation Sandy Bridge parts. Intel itself is thought to be holding on to a surprising stack of chips thanks to a slow down in PC sales over 2011, and that's echoed by its ODM and OEM partners.

By delaying availability of the chips, Intel is hoping it will be able to clear its inventory of existing Sandy Bridge processors without having to resort to extreme discounts.

As the delay is caused by inventory concerns rather than a technical problem, it's unlikely to affect the desktop market. Currently, the only sources speaking out about the delay come from the world of laptops which suggests desktop Ivy Bridge chips are still on track for an April launch with full availability.

The delay is being welcomed by some companies. Manufacturers of third-party USB 3.0 controllers see the delay as an opportunity to gain an extra quarter of sales, before Ivy Bridge's integrated USB 3.0 controller makes their products superfluous.

Intel, as is usual, 'refuses to comment on rumours or speculation regarding unannounced products.'

14 Comments

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damien c 16th February 2012, 11:48 Quote
Oh look a delay on Ivy Bridge because of stack of Sandy Bridge cpu's.

Maybe if they had not released needless chip's aka 2550K then there wouldn't be such a big stack of Sandy Bridge chips.
mjm25 16th February 2012, 11:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by damien c
Oh look a delay on Ivy Bridge because of stack of Sandy Bridge cpu's.

Maybe if they had not released needless chip's aka 2550K then there wouldn't be such a big stack of Sandy Bridge chips.

The 2550k etc are the excess chips sir, speed binned and marketed as a new product.
dr-strangelove 16th February 2012, 13:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Article
By delaying availability of the chips, Intel is hoping it will be able to clear its inventory of existing Sandy Bridge processors without having to resort to extreme discounts.

I hope they do drop the price, about €70 less would convince me to upgrade
rollo 16th February 2012, 14:13 Quote
if you could get a 2500k and board for £200 then most would upgrade instantly
bdigital 16th February 2012, 14:32 Quote
Thats a shame, I was hoping to see these soon. Or at least see some bonifide reviews/benchmarks
Vo0Ds 16th February 2012, 14:47 Quote
I think I'll be keeping my 2500 and waiting for the new nVidia cards...
Anneon 16th February 2012, 16:14 Quote
I guess less people than expected burned their chips under the overclocker warranty program
damien c 16th February 2012, 16:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anneon
I guess less people than expected burned their chips under the overclocker warranty program

Not got my warranty yet, but will be getting it at the end of this month and will be doing some run's with my 2700K.

Had mine posting at 5.5ghz but wouldn't load windows and at the moment I don't want to put more than 1.475v through it until I have the warranty.

Was hoping Ivy Bridge would have been released the 1st week of April but it's not looking that way, so my bonus money is going on something else.
azazel1024 16th February 2012, 17:04 Quote
What I want is my Celeron 530t. I wants me a nice super low power full desktop CPU for my file server to replace my not so good Sempron 140 (the process is sufficient as a file, lightweight webserver, but the chipset has an issue with WOL where network transfers are painfully slow for 5-6 minutes after waking from S3, like 20-25MB/sec for the first 5-6 minutes and then shooting back up to the regular 100-110MB/sec).

Oh and cheap.

Though since its going to be at least 6 months before I can afford to upgrade the file server, maybe low end Pentium and Celeron IB parts will be in the channel and board prices will be down enough to make that worth while instead of SB Pentium/Celeron.

Hopefully those desktop Ivy Bridge parts stay on target though. I am hoping to "ditch" my old Core 2 Duo E7500 system for a nice quad core IB setup sometime in the late May/Early June time frame for my birthday. Shooting for sub $500. Low end video card (7770 if prices come down a little an Nvidia hasn't come out with, or doesn't have a superior showing? Maybe a 7750 if prices don't come down much), either an i5-3570 or i7-3770 depending on price/performance once they start shipping and I can see some numbers behind them, and some "basic" motherboard. Pretty much anything with 6 SATA slots, a 16x and at least 2 1x PCI-e slots will do the job for me (oh, and works).

Probably going to ditch the 4GB (2x2GB) of memory I have in my current system for 2x4GB before the upgrade (dropping the memory in my file server, as it is running 1x2GB right now).

Hoping to keep the cost under $500 for everything, which I can probably do with an i5-3570 (no K part, I don't plan on doing any real overclocking, though I'll probably tweak the base clock by a few mhz if that is stable) and a 7750 along with a panther point motherboard and the 8GB of memory.
nilesfoundglory 16th February 2012, 19:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by damien c
Oh look a delay on Ivy Bridge because of stack of Sandy Bridge cpu's.

Nope. According to my sources, it's an honest-to-goodness manufacturing/validating/QA issue. I first heard about this delay back in January directly from an engineer for a Tier 1 manufacturer. Anyone who claims it's due to overstock of Sandy Bridge parts is blithe to Intel's sales history and market dominance. They really don't care about clearing out the sales channel before deploying new CPUs, sockets, or chipsets.
Sloth 16th February 2012, 20:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vo0Ds
I think I'll be keeping my 2500 and waiting for the new nVidia cards...
This delay seems to go hand in hand with what we're seeing with AMD's 7000 series. Old stock is still not only quite capable, but also readily accessible from many retailers. This leaves manufacturers with a few options, none of which are particularly great for them and only one of which is good for consumers, and no one's opting for that. They can release new products at premium prices to maintain the validity of old products until stock runs out like AMD, they can delay new products until old stock runs out like Intel, or they can force old products into unprofitably low prices in order to keep new products at their intended pricing as Intel mentions.

It'll be interesting to see if Nividia is hit by this as well. 500 series cards are certainly capable, and are also readily available even as the launch of new cards draws near. Will they do like AMD and price the new series to fit with the old? Will they do like Intel and paper launch? Or can they afford to cut the pricing of old cards to shift stock? A lot of people, including those looking to buy AMD, are looking for the latter to drive GPU prices down but it's looking less and less likely.
Floyd 16th February 2012, 22:45 Quote
Still loving my 2500k to death. More than enough power at 4.6
teacherboy 16th February 2012, 23:14 Quote
^ ditto - although as IB is compatible with SB socket I might upgrade for my birthday in June and sell on the 2500k to someone in the family or just keep as an overclocking toy with the warranty I'll buy when its available
TheDodoKiller 17th February 2012, 16:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by damien c

Maybe if they had not released needless chip's aka 2550K then there wouldn't be such a big stack of Sandy Bridge chips.

I didn't even know that a 2550K existed...- a bit like when I found out about the 2700K.
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