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Sandy Bridge-E power draw and pricing details emerge

Sandy Bridge-E power draw and pricing details emerge

If the rumours are true then cooling an overclocked and overvolted Sandy Bridge-E processor could be a challenge

Intel’s new LGA2011 processors are due for release later this year and it looks like the company will be taking the unusual step of shipping them without a reference cooler.

The decision, first reported by VR-Zone, seems logical to us as the Sandy Bridge-E processors are going to be targeted at enthusiasts and enterprise users, most of which will install third party cooling solutions or even water cooling.

It appears that Intel will still be selling its own coolers for the LGA2011 socket, but you’ll have to buy these separately from the processors, which seems like a strange move - why would you buy a reference cooler over a third party effort?

The website also claims to have additional information on the power draw of the first LGA2011 CPUs to hit the market - the 3820, 3930K and the 3960X. Each processor will apparently have a TDP of a whopping 130W, though that figure allegedly rises to something more like 180W when the processors are pushed.

To supply this extreme demand PSU manufacturers are being asked to make sure their 8-pin 12VEPS connector can supply a peak current of 23A.

This sounds like an obscene amount of power and we can’t help thinking that cooler manufacturers are going to have their work cut out designing coolers that can both dissipate the waste heat of an 180W cooler, and fit between the two banks of memory sandwiching the LGA2011 socket.

In addition to the new information about power draw, more details on the proposed pricing for the processors have also emerged. See the table below for a summary of the rumoured prices and specifications of the three launch day CPUs.

 i7-3820i7-3930ki7-3960X
Price$294$583$999
Cores/Threads4/86/126/12
Frequency3.6GHz3.2GHz3.3GHz
Max Turbo3.9GHz3.8GHz3.9GHz
L3 Cache10MB12MB15MB
Unlocked MultiplierNoYesYes

Do you expect Sandy Bridge-E to be difficult to cool? Are you planning a LGA 2011 build? Let us know your thoughts in the forums.

39 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Deadpunkdave 16th August 2011, 12:37 Quote
Well, this should keep the water cooling fans happy. The appeal of the current SB CPUs for me was that I got a much more powerful CPU with less heat and noise than what I upgraded from. SB-E will be a true enthusiast product I think, even as a gamer who likes the latest kit (and went the 2500k route), I see this as completely unnecessary. Obviously it will be welcomed by those who need as much grunt as they can get for specialist applications or those who want to demolish SuperPi.

All of which I suppose means Intel are launching a product which serves the market they are aiming for! Now if only they could figure out a naming system which had some logical basis.
warejon9 16th August 2011, 12:38 Quote
Wow, those look rather expensive!
Gigglebyte 16th August 2011, 12:43 Quote
I was waiting for these to see if the prices of i5 2500k and i7 2600k would drop, perhaps the i7 3820 will push them down a bit :3
Madness_3d 16th August 2011, 12:51 Quote
£580 for the overclockable chip?! PASS. Student budget doesn't stretch that far. Waiting for Ivy Bridge/Bulldozer it is.
SolidShot 16th August 2011, 12:54 Quote
How much real life difference will $999 make over the current SB i wonder?

Not enough i feel...
MjFrosty 16th August 2011, 12:56 Quote
Not supplying a heat sink & fan with an enthusiast chip? Understandable
Selling the reference coolers separately? Makes no sense at all.

What with the memory banks, I'm guessing most if not all users will resort to water cooling. That's the only way you're going to be able to dull all that heat, especially with any kind of decent OC.
aleph31 16th August 2011, 12:57 Quote
Will the K (and X) series feature the VT-d bit?
Shayper09 16th August 2011, 12:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madness_3d
£580 for the overclockable chip?! PASS. Student budget doesn't stretch that far. Waiting for Ivy Bridge/Bulldozer it is.

580 dollars, so around 350 quid. Plus vat etc. For an overclockable high end hex core that isn't bad at all!

However, I can't see it being too much of an upgrade over my 2500k, especially with the lack of quicksync. So I'm going to wait for ivy bridge, and match that with a water-cooled 680 :)
r3loaded 16th August 2011, 13:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madness_3d
£580 for the overclockable chip?! PASS. Student budget doesn't stretch that far. Waiting for Ivy Bridge/Bulldozer it is.
It's $580, which ain't bad for an enthusiast chip. If you need something on a student budget, the 2500K offers an incredible amount of performance. :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by aleph31
Will the K (and X) series feature the VT-d bit?
I bloody well hope that all LGA2011 chips support it, otherwise they're gonna get murdered for that. The type of people buying these chips will be building a workstation-class computer, so a lot of them will be doing a fair bit of virtualisation.
Parge 16th August 2011, 13:11 Quote
180w and Sandybridge architecture. This chip is going to be an absolute BEAST
Tattysnuc 16th August 2011, 13:13 Quote
I guess the lack of a heatsink is expected. Do Xeons come with a HSF? I guess that it all comes down to cost, and storing and shipping these expensive heatsinks etc must be a significant cost, on what is a premium line. I've NEVER used their heatsinks anyway- they've been rubbish compared to the best in class, and water....

For me the Stock HSF are a throw away item. Looking at the cost of 130W+ ie decent sized heatpipe technology based HSF's, they're not an insignificant cost to buy or produce...
Claave 16th August 2011, 13:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MjFrosty
Not supplying a heat sink & fan with an enthusiast chip? Understandable
Selling the reference coolers separately? Makes no sense at all.

It'll be for workstations, servers etc. The people that manage those kinds of systems want a cooler that is 100% qualified by Intel to work without fail. And probably want one company to deal with if and when something does. As this is a specialist requirement, it makes sense to keep these people happy by offering the product, and even more sense to not force everyone to buy them.
GiantKiwi 16th August 2011, 13:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madness_3d
£580 for the overclockable chip?! PASS. Student budget doesn't stretch that far. Waiting for Ivy Bridge/Bulldozer it is.

Even if it was £580, on a student budget + a part time job thats completely doable :P
faugusztin 16th August 2011, 13:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigglebyte
I was waiting for these to see if the prices of i5 2500k and i7 2600k would drop, perhaps the i7 3820 will push them down a bit :3

Not going to happen. Intel has established price points. ~250-280e for mainstream highend, ~200e for 2nd highest, the rest below. That is Socket 1155 this time.

Then you got the enthusiast highend, which is $999 or ~900e all the time. Then you got the ~500e second best CPU in enthusiast category, and then you get the "lowend" enthusiast CPU in the same ~250-280e category as the mainstream highend.

So if you think that the ~250-280e price category for i7-3820 will lower the ~250-280 price category for i7-2600/2600K, then you are way too optimistic. As i said - price decrease of i72600K because of the Sandy Bridge-E is not going to happen.

For example - check the mainstream highend of Socket 1156 now. i7-870 is still at the 250-280e price point. And Core 2 Quads would be too, but they are not on sale anymore.
Coz 16th August 2011, 13:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deadpunkdave

as a gamer who likes the latest kit (and went the 2500k route), I see this as completely unnecessary. Obviously it will be welcomed by those who need as much grunt as they can get for specialist applications or those who want to demolish SuperPi.
Agreed! I bought a Xeon W3690 (equivalent to a Core i7-990X) for less than a Core i7-2600k last November. But even though it sounds awesome to have a high-end, hexa-core chip, in reality most of the cores remain underutilised and the 2600K would be faster in most of the things I use my computer for. So, when I get the opportunity to snag a bargain basement Jaketown (SB-E) CPU I might have to seriously consider just waiting for desktop Ivy Bridge instead.

More is sometimes less.
the_kille4 16th August 2011, 13:33 Quote
already said that in the http://forums.bit-tech.net/showthread.php?t=213648 thread...should be in page 7 & 8...

nonetheless you totally forgot the news that the quad core version would come later than the hexcore processors.

although if you really wanted an intel cooler you still can buy one meant for the LGA 2011

I think that using the H100, the new cooler from Corsair would be great for this build... a 240mm rad which is pre-sealed... does make SB-E tamer to build
Spreadie 16th August 2011, 13:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MjFrosty
Not supplying a heat sink & fan with an enthusiast chip? Understandable
Selling the reference coolers separately? Makes no sense at all.

It does if Intel are moving into the CPU cooler market. Perhaps the new reference coolers are considerably more advanced than the usual Intel fare?
Paradigm Shifter 16th August 2011, 13:51 Quote
Guess I'll stick to my i7 920 a bit longer, then. If I'm really desperate, I can always see about finding a 970/980 for a hexacore CPU.
Bloody_Pete 16th August 2011, 14:00 Quote
I guess this possibly answers the question if SB-E will have locked clocks, as that unlocked multiplier chip is too cheap for it to have unlocked clocks too...
Bede 16th August 2011, 14:02 Quote
These should be seriously impressive, I'm especially looking forward to seeing what the 3930K can do for properly threaded applications as that seems to be the price/performance sweet spot.
Evildead666 16th August 2011, 14:07 Quote
On VR-Zone is specifically states that the 130W is the rated TDP, and that WITHOUT OVERCLOCKING these chips are hitting 180W power consumption, leading them to have to ask PSU suppliers to make sure their PSU's can supply enough current.

Sort of reminds me of a Green team having qualified PSU's and Cases for their product.

The reason they do not supply boxed cooler is for price. If they had to include a stock cooler capable of 180W dissipation, they would have to up the price of the boxed version by a good few dollars.

So they go the 'enthusiast' route and remove the boxed cooler, and charge the same price anyway.

It looks to me like they have a problem with Clockspeed and Thermals, you can't have both.
They would have never released a 180W part if they could have helped it, which begs the question "What went wrong?".
thelaw 16th August 2011, 14:29 Quote
"It appears that Intel will still be selling its own coolers for the LGA2011 socket, but you’ll have to buy these separately from the processors"

This sounds like an obscene amount of power and we can’t help thinking that cooler manufacturers are going to have their work cut out designing coolers that can both dissipate the waste heat of an 180W cooler"


So intell are designing there own performance cooler for there performance cpu's, I had a mate of mine working in intel R&D email a sneak peak photo what they have come up with so far, still a 'work in progress' but it is pretty much what we will expect to see with a intel designed cooler


http://i246.photobucket.com/albums/gg117/clan_hunter/refrigerator-2.jpg
Evildead666 16th August 2011, 14:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelaw
"It appears that Intel will still be selling its own coolers for the LGA2011 socket, but you’ll have to buy these separately from the processors"

This sounds like an obscene amount of power and we can’t help thinking that cooler manufacturers are going to have their work cut out designing coolers that can both dissipate the waste heat of an 180W cooler"


So intell are designing there own performance cooler for there performance cpu's, I had a mate of mine working in intel R&D email a sneak peak photo what they have come up with so far, still a 'work in progress' but it is pretty much what we will expect to see with a intel designed cooler


http://i246.photobucket.com/albums/gg117/clan_hunter/refrigerator-2.jpg

LOL ;)
Taniniver 16th August 2011, 14:55 Quote
Looks like I made the right choice on upgrading!

I was toying with the idea of 2500K for quite a while but also considering hanging on to see what socket 2011 brought. With this information, I think I made the right choice by getting my 2500K months back and not waiting.

The i7-3930k looks like the equivalent in terms of clock speed but is 6 core, which is the only reason I had been considering waiting. At $583 though that's over £350 for a direct $ to £ conversion, not including rip off britain price hike.

I can certainly see this being faster for things that can really take advantage of the memory bandwidth and extra cores, but for my purposes (gaming, mostly) it doesn't make sense.
mucgoo 16th August 2011, 15:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taniniver
The i7-3930k looks like the equivalent in terms of clock speed but is 6 core, which is the only reason I had been considering waiting. At $583 though that's over £350 for a direct $ to £ conversion, not including rip off britain price hike.

The reason we suffer a price hike in comparison to the US is VAT at 20%. In comparison e-tailers in the US charge no sales tax due to some loophole in interstate taxs laws.
rollo 16th August 2011, 15:02 Quote
prices are what most expected who have been looking at this

quad channal ram
999 dollars cpu
expensive mobo

dout your getting much change outta 2k

power draw is worrying but anyone buying this is expected to be water cooling i guess
faugusztin 16th August 2011, 15:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mucgoo
The reason we suffer a price hike in comparison to the US is VAT at 20%. In comparison e-tailers in the US charge no sales tax due to some loophole in interstate taxs laws.

It is not a loophole, it is only one thing - people don't pay the inter-state sales taxes on their yearly tax form.

And the reason why you don't pay sales taxes right when buying items over internet from different state in USA is because of the crazy sales tax definition - you have the state, the county, the city (or city part) sales taxes. In short no one could have all sales taxes valid for all potential buyers in their database, so they could apply the right sales tax. Because of that. you should pay your sales taxes at the end of the year, when you fill out your tax form and pay your taxes. But why bother, right ? :D Interestingly, Europe is so much easier in this area. European Union has 27 states, that means 27 different VAT percentages. And that is it, 27 fixed values (and some extra because of special lower taxes for some items in some countries), which are easy to follow and handle. When i was buying from Amazon UK when UK had 17.5% VAT and Slovakia 19% VAT, Amazon automatically and correctly applied the 19% VAT on my order.

And mucgoo is right in the part that you can't just take the US price and convert it to GBP or EUR - you need to add the VAT, sometimes customs and a bit of "screw the stupid europeans" tax :).
the_kille4 16th August 2011, 17:04 Quote
bobwya 16th August 2011, 17:12 Quote
Ironic. I'm desperately trying to save electricity not use half the national grid... I thought server farms were as well? Intel roadmap derailed somewhat? I thought the FinFet design allowed quite big power savings...
play_boy_2000 16th August 2011, 17:27 Quote
180W is absolutely obscene, and $583 for an unlocked processor is just salt in the wound.
This is clearly a chip designed for the 4+ way server market (with a lower TDP, mind), so I don't understand why Intel is even planning on selling this to enthousiasts (unless s1356 is a ways off, or has been scrapped?).
r3loaded 16th August 2011, 18:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwya
I thought the FinFet design allowed quite big power savings...
These chips won't be made on the new 22nm process - it's just souped-up Sandy Bridge at 32nm. Ivy Bridge (and a hypothetical Ivy Bridge-E) will be on 22nm and bring those fancy new transistors.
Madness_3d 16th August 2011, 19:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shayper09
580 dollars, so around 350 quid. Plus vat etc. For an overclockable high end hex core that isn't bad at all!

i7 2600K
Newegg: $314.99
Scan: £236.60
$314.99 is £191.79 so that's a 23% premium we're paying in UK.

$583 -> £354.97 x1.23 = £436.61

Is Newegg based in a state where they don't pay Vat?

And yeah it's doable on a budget, I've set aside some money for PC upgrades already, but it's considering the cost of the whole platform and the performance gains from it. Like I said I'll wait for IvyBridge. ;)
faugusztin 16th August 2011, 19:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madness_3d
Is Newegg based in a state where they don't pay Vat?

In USA, the price you see on the Internet or on the shelf in shop is always WITHOUT the sales tax. The sales tax in brick&mortar shops are shown only when you are paying (you see the sales taxed on the paper printed from the cash register), on internet again only at final checkout and only if you are from the same state as the shop. It is a different system.

That is why i laugh everytime someone says that something is overpriced here in EU and the difference is only 20% - because then our price is exactly the same, just ours with VAT and theirs without the sales tax.
Evildead666 16th August 2011, 19:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_kille4
this is what Intel is selling as a cooler for the LGA 2011 chips...
http://whatswithjeff.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/intel_sandy_bridge-e_stock_cooler.jpg
the difference between this and the stock LGA 1366 cooler is...
http://images.bidorbuy.co.za/user_images/671/1530671_100217101052_5960_Intel_Socket_LGA1366_Cooler_-_Heatsink_and_Fan_xl.jpg

The SandyBridge-E version (If it is indeed that) looks just like the i980X version, maybe with an extra heatpipe, can't quite see clearly.
Coz 17th August 2011, 11:50 Quote
I asked a friend (who knows all there is to know about this stuff) about this story and he pointed out that Jaketown has an interface in the PCU (Power Control Unit) called "RAPL" (Running Average Power Limit) which can very effectively cap the power level of the processor. So, with that mechanism in place, why would Intel let the power level go beyond the 130W TDP? Intel Turbo Boost 2.0 is power limited as well I think.

Maybe the motherboard makers are stress-testing their designs with some sort of non-limited sample processor? I'm sure the final shipping product will be no more power hungry than previous 130W TDP parts when we see it later this year.
Chriscogley 25th August 2011, 17:49 Quote
wow they look expensive and very flash and modern
but gonna need a bigger radiators, bigger fans, and more coolant to keep that bad boy at bay
metarinka 29th August 2011, 23:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madness_3d
Is Newegg based in a state where they don't pay Vat?

In USA, the price you see on the Internet or on the shelf in shop is always WITHOUT the sales tax. The sales tax in brick&mortar shops are shown only when you are paying (you see the sales taxed on the paper printed from the cash register), on internet again only at final checkout and only if you are from the same state as the shop. It is a different system.

That is why i laugh everytime someone says that something is overpriced here in EU and the difference is only 20% - because then our price is exactly the same, just ours with VAT and theirs without the sales tax.

sales tax in the US never tops 10%, it goes by state it's 6% in my native michigan and there's no sales tax in Oregon, there's also no sales tax on online sales across state borders, so for Newegg that means outside of new jersey or CA, there's no sales tax.
faugusztin 29th August 2011, 23:30 Quote
"there's also no sales tax on online sales across state borders" - and this is where you are mistaken. There is a sales tax, but it's you who should put it in your tax report, not the shop. If you don't believe me, believe them :
http://www.ctj.org/taxjusticedigest/archive/2011/08/its_time_for_a_federal_solutio.php
Quote:
If you’ve ever bought something online, then most likely you’ve cheated on your taxes. Not many realize it, but people making online purchases are required to pay sales taxes on those purchases directly to their state government. Unfortunately, hardly anyone reports these taxes (either because of ignorance or a desire to save a buck), and the law is essentially unenforceable.

Or read your tax laws yourself. The point is - if sales tax is not collected by shop, then you must pay them yourself. If you don't do that, you are pretty much cheating your state on sales taxes.

Of course if your state really have no sales tax, then you are OK. But in most states in USA, you are not OK.

Edit: Oh and the percentage value of sales tax ? It's really sub-10%, unless local laws add more taxes on top of it, and you are in 10-20% sales tax region in most states.
Tangster 23rd September 2011, 08:03 Quote
looks like I'll be sticking with X58 until ivy bridge then.
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