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Modding MacBook Air could cause fire

Modding MacBook Air could cause fire

Apple's MacBook Air is a tempting device for modders, but be careful of its fragile battery.

Tinkerers hoping to make something more exiting out of Apple's new MacBook Air ultra-portables are being warned to watch the battery: its fragile design can lead to fire if it isn't handled with care.

The claim comes courtesy of French site HardMac, which dismantled one of Apple's latest ultra-slim creations and discovered that the non-removable battery is not protected in the usual way.

Traditional lithium-ion and lithium-polymer laptop batteries include robust protection to ensure that the casing doesn't get cracked, damaged, or cut - any of which can lead to leaks or localised overheating. The MacBook Air, however, eschews these protections, relying instead on the casing of the laptop to provide a damage-proof covering for the volatile internals.

While that's fine for most users, who won't be able to get at the non-user-replaceable battery anyway, anyone hoping to mod the device is warned to take extra care around the unusually exposed battery.

HardMac warns modders that 'one should be very careful to not apply any pressure to the modules, even less to knock them in any way with a screwdrivers or to make to scratch them that could damage the envelope seals' or they could run the risk of causing the battery to ignite.

It's further claimed that Apple knows of the risk, issuing its repair centres with plexiglass plates that fit over the battery while work is being carried out. This is specifically to avoid any risk of damage.

With Toshiba having released its ultra-slim SSDs to the general market, it's not hard to imagine a future where a MacBook Air owner fancies upgrading the storage inside their laptop - but it certainly looks like they'll have to take care when they do.

Are you shocked that Apple would put such a fragile battery into the MacBook Air in the first place, or is its inaccessibility to most people protection enough? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

50 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Optimaximal 9th November 2010, 14:07 Quote
How can you really be shocked by any design decisions Apple make, whether they're for the good or the bad. They just don't want people tinkering, so go out of their way to fudge it as much as feasibly possible so they can't.
perplekks45 9th November 2010, 14:21 Quote
Apple doesn't want anyone to open their products, that's not a secret. Maybe they did that to teach people who try a lesson? ;)
Stotherd-001 9th November 2010, 14:24 Quote
Shouldn't there be warnings all over the thing mentioning how it could explode if opened? Could this not be an issue if the casae gets a bit too much pressue over the battery?

Perhaps more importantly... who's apple going to blame when these things start exploding?
bowman 9th November 2010, 14:33 Quote
It would seem HardMac has no evidence of which battery chemistry has been used.

LiCo cells are unstable by design and yes, would cause a serious fire if punctured or discharged too much.

LiFePO cells are much more stable, but have a lower voltage and possibly lower energy density.

LiMn is used mostly in power tools but is a very stable chemistry. It doesn't need protection circuits for overdischarge or overcurrent for instance.

So which is it, HardMac? I'm not much of an Apple guy, don't own a single one of their products, but this reeks of sensationalism before facts.
StoneyMahoney 9th November 2010, 14:53 Quote
SSD on the logic board, RAM soldered to the logic board, no internal ports of any kind... you'd have to be some kind of genius just to figure out what mods were even possible.
CharlO 9th November 2010, 14:57 Quote
Wait! Explodes if hitted in the right place, and airport safe? All in a white an shiny exterior?
Guinevere 9th November 2010, 15:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
Apple doesn't want anyone to open their products, that's not a secret. Maybe they did that to teach people who try a lesson? ;)

Er then why do they supply instructions with the machines on how to upgrade? My MBP came with detailed manual on upgrading RAM or HD.
l3v1ck 9th November 2010, 15:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimaximal
How can you really be shocked by any design decisions Apple make, whether they're for the good or the bad. They just don't want people tinkering, so go out of their way to fudge it as much as feasibly possible so they can't.
My thoughts exactly.
Cafuddled 9th November 2010, 16:18 Quote
So for the people willing to void their warranty, don't touch the battery...

If you tell people not to open the laptop and they do and they ruin it by doing so then they cant really be to blame.
chrisb2e9 9th November 2010, 16:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowman
It would seem HardMac has no evidence of which battery chemistry has been used.

LiCo cells are unstable by design and yes, would cause a serious fire if punctured or discharged too much.

LiFePO cells are much more stable, but have a lower voltage and possibly lower energy density.

LiMn is used mostly in power tools but is a very stable chemistry. It doesn't need protection circuits for overdischarge or overcurrent for instance.

So which is it, HardMac? I'm not much of an Apple guy, don't own a single one of their products, but this reeks of sensationalism before facts.

Who cares what kind of battery it is, putting out a warning to help people is a good thing to do. Would you rather that they just sat back and did nothing?
StudioRecorder 9th November 2010, 16:50 Quote
yes the mac book pro can be upgraded because it was designed to be. it uses standard ram modules and hard rives that you can swap out and in. the NEW macbook AIR though has all the ram and storage chips soldered directly to the logic board, ergo no way to put more on then what it came with.
Dreaming 9th November 2010, 17:08 Quote
You have to give reasonable notice under law I think, people don't expect to open a laptop and have it explode - just the same as someone wouldn't expect to die from opening an unplugged TV. That's why they have warning stickers over them.

If Apple hasn't acknowledged this issue, and someone does open it - I'm sure Apple will say "curiosity got the cat" but UK and US law I believe will say you have to give proper notice, because.. cats can be curious.
noobieocer 9th November 2010, 17:13 Quote
you cant access the hdd with a simple plate or something?
Jehla 9th November 2010, 18:00 Quote
Why are people talking about the laptop exploding if you hit it in the right place? I'm pretty sure the aluminium body offers more protection than the casing used on most laptop batteries.
Dreaming 9th November 2010, 18:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jehla
Why are people talking about the laptop exploding if you hit it in the right place? I'm pretty sure the aluminium body offers more protection than the casing used on most laptop batteries.

A lot of people on bit-tech like modding, and so will inevitibly end up taking stuff apart.

The MacBook air is relatively more dangerous to take apart because of this lack of internal shielding, so that's why people talking about it.
g3n3tiX 9th November 2010, 18:21 Quote
Check IFixit, the screws needed to open the MBA's cover are very special... And there are several all very special.
I'm not surprised they ditched the battery cases, they really wanted to make it thin. At any price.
Unicorn 9th November 2010, 18:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimaximal
They just don't want people tinkering, so go out of their way to fudge it as much as feasibly possible so they can't.

Oh hi Apple hater. Welcome to bit-tech. Now, kindly listen carefully to the next few sentences because I'm about to prove what you just said is nothing but fanboy/hater bull****, k?

Apple openly admitted the different and slightly more exposed design of the batteries in their new MBP, MB Air and mobile devices like iPhones and iPods long ago, at a WWDC event and on their website. This new design is what allows them to fit more cells into their mobile device batteries and create higher mAh batteries which hold more charge and last longer. Making their products as "tamper proof" as possible has less to do with it than the price of tea in China.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stotherd-001
Shouldn't there be warnings all over the thing mentioning how it could explode if opened? Could this not be an issue if the casae gets a bit too much pressue over the battery?

No. See below.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowman
It would seem HardMac has no evidence of which battery chemistry has been used.

LiCo cells are unstable by design and yes, would cause a serious fire if punctured or discharged too much.

LiFePO cells are much more stable, but have a lower voltage and possibly lower energy density.

LiMn is used mostly in power tools but is a very stable chemistry. It doesn't need protection circuits for overdischarge or overcurrent for instance.

So which is it, HardMac? I'm not much of an Apple guy, don't own a single one of their products, but this reeks of sensationalism before facts.

You hit the nail on the head. It's obvious that Apple are using a battery chemistry (none of which anyone else who has commented here knows anything about, obviously) which allows them to do this safely. The "protective casing" on other laptop batteries which use more volatile chemistries is only there because those are inferior to whatever type Apple are using here. I'm willing to bet that I could shoot a MBA battery whilst it was being over charged and it still wouldn't make a difference.
bowman 9th November 2010, 18:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisb2e9

Who cares what kind of battery it is, putting out a warning to help people is a good thing to do. Would you rather that they just sat back and did nothing?

I would rather that they qualified their statements. Warning people without decent research and complete information isn't a warning, it's fear mongering. They want more clicks on their petty French site, and that's what they got.

'Who cares what kind of battery it is'? You do realize that whether or not a battery is dangerous depends ENTIRELY on what kind of battery it is, don't you? HardMac ought to care. Pretty sure Apple cares.
jrs77 9th November 2010, 19:18 Quote
Apple-products like these are not ment to be opened by anyone not working for Apple. End of discussion.

The only hardware produced by apple, where a customer is actually allowed to open and modify hardware is the MacPro Desktop and on the MacBookPro and MacBook you're only allowed to change the HDD and RAM, which doesn't require you to open the case in it's full extend.

If you crack an egg, then warranty is void.

I'm not a hardcore Apple-fan, never was, but you simply can't complain about their products, if you do anything with them you're not supposed to do.

If you don't like this, then don't buy Apple-products. Period.

Just shut up allready, as this discussion is getting very old.
barndoor101 9th November 2010, 19:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
You hit the nail on the head. It's obvious that Apple are using a battery chemistry (none of which anyone else who has commented here knows anything about, obviously) which allows them to do this safely. The "protective casing" on other laptop batteries which use more volatile chemistries is only there because those are inferior to whatever type Apple are using here. I'm willing to bet that I could shoot a MBA battery whilst it was being over charged and it still wouldn't make a difference.

if they are anything like iPhone 3G batteries then they will smoke and set on fire if punctured. One of my colleagues replaced his battery in his old iPhone 3G, so we had a spare battery pack lying around - if you havent seen one then imagine a squishy bag filled with gel.

we had a bright idea to put a screwdriver through it - theres still a scorch mark on his desk. the office had an acrid smell too.
lp1988 9th November 2010, 19:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by StudioRecorder
the NEW macbook AIR though has all the ram and storage chips soldered directly to the logic board, ergo no way to put more on then what it came with.

Makes sense, the Air is all about being thin, and that is what you get. by soldering everything to a single board you:

1. Only have one layer so the board is more stable.
2. You don't rely on electrical connections that may disengage or become unstable in other ways
3. you lose the extra layers of protection that otherwise should protect one PCB from rubbing against a different PCB

I see the reasons and you have to say that they are very good at what they are doing, I'm no fan of apple, as a company they are complete *******s. but they are smart none the less.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaming
If Apple hasn't acknowledged this issue, and someone does open it - I'm sure Apple will say "curiosity got the cat" but UK and US law I believe will say you have to give proper notice, because.. cats can be curious.

I may be mistaken but doesn't British law include bonus pater familias, unlike US law where nothing is ever your own fault.
Unicorn 9th November 2010, 19:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by barndoor101
if they are anything like iPhone 3G batteries


They probably are. The 3G uses a Lithium Ion Polymer battery. Yes, it looks like a bag of gel if you want to be that untechnical about it. The first gen MBA also uses a Li-Po battery, but from what I can tell from the teardown photos, the polymer cells are contained within fireproof material designed for lithium batteries. If the battery in the new generation MBA really is made up of Lithium Ion Polymer cells, then they must have found a way to make them safer and also...
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs77
Apple-products like these are not ment to be opened by anyone not working for Apple. End of discussion.

The only hardware produced by apple, where a customer is actually allowed to open and modify hardware is the MacPro Desktop and on the MacBookPro and MacBook you're only allowed to change the HDD and RAM, which doesn't require you to open the case in it's full extend.

If you crack an egg, then warranty is void.

I'm not a hardcore Apple-fan, never was, but you simply can't complain about their products, if you do anything with them you're not supposed to do.

What he said.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lp1988
I see the reasons and you have to say that they are very good at what they are doing, I'm no fan of apple, as a company they are complete *******s.

What? *hangs and shakes head*
Guinevere 9th November 2010, 19:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobieocer
you cant access the hdd with a simple plate or something?

On a MBP you can. But due to the alu unibody, the "simple plate" is the bottom panel. I upgraded my RAM this week (8GB rocks!) and it took 2 minutes tops to upgrade. It would have been quicker but you have to take your time when you've got three year old twins looking over your shoulder!
Jehla 9th November 2010, 20:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaming
A lot of people on bit-tech like modding, and so will inevitibly end up taking stuff apart.

The MacBook air is relatively more dangerous to take apart because of this lack of internal shielding, so that's why people talking about it.

"Wait! Explodes if hitted in the right place, and airport safe? All in a white an shiny exterior?"

"Could this not be an issue if the casae gets a bit too much pressue over the battery?"

I'm not saying you should not mod it, just that I would not worry about it blowing up if you knock the laptop with it's case on.
Optimaximal 9th November 2010, 22:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
Oh hi Apple hater. Welcome to bit-tech. Now, kindly listen carefully to the next few sentences because I'm about to prove what you just said is nothing but fanboy/hater bull****, k?

Wait a sec, i'm an Apple hater (whatever one of those is), yet you basically agreed a few posts later with someone who essentially said the same thing?

Grow the **** up.
Sloth 9th November 2010, 22:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimaximal
Wait a sec, i'm an Apple hater (whatever one of those is), yet you basically agreed a few posts later with someone who essentially said the same thing?

Grow the **** up.
You'll notice that there is a very distinct difference between preventing users from opening a device, and making a device which has no practical purpose for being opened. Your post was arguing for the former, while Unicorn agrees with the latter.

You effectively said that the product was made purposefully dangerous to tamper with as an attempt to keep people from opening the case. An applicable term would be "booby trapped".

What Unicorn agrees with is that there is no legitimate reason to a user to open it in the first place, so the danger of the contents is irrelevant provided it poses no threat during normal operation. The design saves them space and increases the effectiveness of the product while doing no harm during intended operation, so they use it. Not some secret plot by Steve Jobs to harm those who try to steal his magic smoke.
barndoor101 9th November 2010, 23:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth
Not some secret plot by Steve Jobs to harm those who try to steal his magic smoke.

shouldnt that be iSmoke?
eternum 10th November 2010, 00:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
Oh hi Apple hater. Welcome to bit-tech. Now, kindly listen carefully to the next few sentences because I'm about to prove what you just said is nothing but fanboy/hater bull****, k?

Oh hi Mac Fanboi. Welcome to bit-tech. Your arrogance is well... predictable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
You hit the nail on the head. It's obvious that Apple are using a battery chemistry (none of which anyone else who has commented here knows anything about, obviously)

Obviously. Including you, since you could only conjecture later that it was similar to the 3g battery, and then make a speculative guess based on... nothing, that they found a way to make them safer. It's a battery in a device that is not meant to be opened except for service by a trained technician who is provided with a plexiglass plate to cover said battery while he works. It is obviously unsafe while the case is open, and the case is obviously not intended to be opened by the end-user at all. Obviously.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
The "protective casing" on other laptop batteries which use more volatile chemistries is only there because those are inferior to whatever type Apple are using here.

Which would be... oh yeah, you don't know what type they're using. It must be superior to other types however, since Apple wouldn't dare sully their devices with the same barbaric and crude technology as other companies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
I'm willing to bet that I could shoot a MBA battery whilst it was being over charged and it still wouldn't make a difference.

Ok, I understand you really, really like Apple products, but you either have a woeful lack of understanding of ballistics, or are taking the piss. I really don't think that there is any reason at all to assume that the type of battery in the MBA (which you could only guess at) is actually bullet-proof. I guess those plexiglass covers that Apple issued to their repair centers are just there to make it look pretty while the techs work on the laptop - it is a Mac, after all. That being said, I applaud your unswerving confidence in these new(?) batteries (that you don't know the specifics of). Seriously, man? Talk about fanboi Bull****

I'm not a Mac hater, BTW. I think they are fine machines - easy to use, trim and streamlined software, and generally quite usable. They are also generally priced 1.5x to 2x what they are worth. Of course, I hadn't taken into account the *cough* bullet-proofing...
DXR_13KE 10th November 2010, 01:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
The "protective casing" on other laptop batteries which use more volatile chemistries is only there because those are inferior to whatever type Apple are using here. I'm willing to bet that I could shoot a MBA battery whilst it was being over charged and it still wouldn't make a difference.

Looking at the pictures at http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook-Air-11-Inch-Model-A1370-Teardown/3745/1 I notice something very interesting, they are li-ion polymer batteries... this gives me the notion that the batteries on the MBA are more dangerous than the batteries on my laptop.

Yes it is a nice machine, but i would really hate it if those batteries were hit... or the aluminium bottom was hit thus squeezing the batteries...

I am not an Apple hater, I consider their hardware very interesting and very beautiful and as any hardware maker they have their flaws and I personally consider the MBA battery a really bad thing.
leveller 10th November 2010, 02:01 Quote
I admire people who mod, but don't cry when the thing breaks.
morris8809 10th November 2010, 05:33 Quote
Quote:

Originally Posted by Unicorn
The "protective casing" on other laptop batteries which use more volatile chemistries is only there because those are inferior to whatever type Apple are using here. I'm willing to bet that I could shoot a MBA battery whilst it was being over charged and it still wouldn't make a difference.

^^ Why don't you go do that? Let me know how it comes out.
desertstalker 10th November 2010, 05:44 Quote
Is it just me or are those flat cells suspiciously LiPo like, you know the sort that get put in RC planes, helicopters and cars and hardly ever explode... Just dont stab them with a screwdriver and you'll be fine.
Malvolio 10th November 2010, 06:33 Quote
@desertstalker: you mean the ones that most people charge within a cinder-block, as they're rather prone to catastrophic failure with even the slightest bit of over-charging (or charging too quickly)? The few times I've looked at upgrading my Revo to LiPO I've been warned and shown examples of exploded batteries, so I'll hazard a guess that they're a rather "touchy" technology. They also typically are housed within a rather tough exterior casing, which is a good chunk of metal to prevent puncture or deformation.
eddtox 10th November 2010, 08:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn
I'm willing to bet that I could shoot a MBA battery whilst it was being over charged and it still wouldn't make a difference.

I will take you up on that bet. You don't have to shoot it though - just stick a screwdriver through it. I'm willing to bet my new i5 system that it WILL "make a difference", especially if you do it while it's "being over charged"
jrs77 10th November 2010, 09:30 Quote
To clarify the discussion about LiPoly-batteries I've found a nice guide how to handle them on a RC-forum.
Note however, that this guide is back from 2005 and does only speak about LiPoly-batteries using gel or fluids.

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=209187

The most modern LiPoly-batteries (introduced in 2010) use dry polymers instead of gel or fluid and can be manufactured in 1mm-thickness.
They are not prone to the above mentioned failures and risks anymore due to the lack of material that can evaporate, but are less effective aswell.

So the only question that remains is, what type of LiPoly-batteries are used.
perplekks45 10th November 2010, 10:33 Quote
Uni... stop the fanboy-bashing while acting like a fanboy yourself.

I don't see what the problem is, to be honest. People who open notebooks should always be careful, right? I mean, if they don't they break something and that's most likely expensive. Now stop crying about Apple being a threat to humanity or people who say that Apple's moves are (sometimes) hard to understand being PC fanboys... grow up.

/rant
Unicorn 10th November 2010, 12:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by eternum
Oh hi Mac Fanboi. Welcome to bit-tech. Your arrogance is well... predictable.

I've never owned a Mac computer in my life and my comment was totally justifiable. He made a brash, blatantly arrogant comment which made absolutely no sense in any context and I am sick to death of people hating Apple computers or Apple products or Apple as a company and not actually having any good reason for it. In my opinion, you cannot hate something for the sake of it... and I hear very few reasonable explations for all the "I hate Apple" comments flying around this forum all the time. I build and work on computers for a living - in a way, Apple are competition for me, but I have as much respect for them as I have any other company. I actually like their products, their technologies and where they are taking the computer industry as a whole. I'm no fanboy though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eternum
Obviously. Including you, since you could only conjecture later that it was similar to the 3g battery, and then make a speculative guess based on... nothing, that they found a way to make them safer. It's a battery in a device that is not meant to be opened except for service by a trained technician who is provided with a plexiglass plate to cover said battery while he works. It is obviously unsafe while the case is open, and the case is obviously not intended to be opened by the end-user at all. Obviously.

Which would be... oh yeah, you don't know what type they're using. It must be superior to other types however, since Apple wouldn't dare sully their devices with the same barbaric and crude technology as other companies.

You need to read what I said more carefully. I don't know what battery is used in the new generation MBA, but the older generation MBA - as stated in the official Apple environmental report for that product - uses Lithium Ion polymer batteries. I speculate that they are using Lithium Polymer batteries because that is the only type of battery that I know of in existence which can be used in that sort of application. My speculative guess that they have found some way to make them safer was not as speculative as you may think. I have been involved in Radio Control as a hobby for about 5 or 6 years, and in that time the development of battery chemistries and Lithium battery safety has come a long, long way. The bigger companies who produce racing packs for brushless cars, planes and helicopters have spent a lot of time and money making the most efficient (power:weight) power source for RC vehicles much safer and more stable. Most modern Li-Po packs are now manufactured with several layers of fireproof material as the outer skin and are safe enough to be used without hard shells.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eternum
Ok, I understand you really, really like Apple products, but you either have a woeful lack of understanding of ballistics, or are taking the piss. I really don't think that there is any reason at all to assume that the type of battery in the MBA (which you could only guess at) is actually bullet-proof. I guess those plexiglass covers that Apple issued to their repair centers are just there to make it look pretty while the techs work on the laptop - it is a Mac, after all. That being said, I applaud your unswerving confidence in these new(?) batteries (that you don't know the specifics of). Seriously, man? Talk about fanboi Bull****

Wow, really? We need some [sarcasm] tags in this thread I believe... I actually was taking the piss. You just lost the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DXR_13KE
Looking at the pictures at http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook-Air-11-Inch-Model-A1370-Teardown/3745/1 I notice something very interesting, they are li-ion polymer batteries... this gives me the notion that the batteries on the MBA are more dangerous than the batteries on my laptop.

Yes it is a nice machine, but i would really hate it if those batteries were hit... or the aluminium bottom was hit thus squeezing the batteries...

I am not an Apple hater, I consider their hardware very interesting and very beautiful and as any hardware maker they have their flaws and I personally consider the MBA battery a really bad thing.

They are not more dangerous than the batteries in your laptop. Even if we could say with absolute certainty that they are li-ion Polymer batteries and Apple are using the same type of cells as they put in the iPhone back in 2007 - why is there such an uproar about this now? Can nobody see that this entire thing is a pointless argument and that HardMac have just stirred the pot for nothing? I think this was just a "give us more hits please" article to be brutally honest. I've been working with Lithium cells using different chemistries for years and years. I know most of the risks that are associated with them, I know how to avoid those risks, I know how difficult it is to make Li-Ion batteries actually dangerous and volatile and I know how stupid and careless you would have to be to actually cause a fire by mistreating them. This whole article has caused even more unnecessary bad publicity for Lithium batteries and Apple notebooks and there was absolutely no need for it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by morris8809
Quote:

Originally Posted by Unicorn
The "protective casing" on other laptop batteries which use more volatile chemistries is only there because those are inferior to whatever type Apple are using here. I'm willing to bet that I could shoot a MBA battery whilst it was being over charged and it still wouldn't make a difference.

^^ Why don't you go do that? Let me know how it comes out.

Learn how to quote. Please.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddtox
I will take you up on that bet. You don't have to shoot it though - just stick a screwdriver through it. I'm willing to bet my new i5 system that it WILL "make a difference", especially if you do it while it's "being over charged"

There are plenty of studies and demonstrations which prove that safe Lithium Polymer batteries which can withstand major trauma like puncturing, crushing or tearing without catching fire have been developed and are in existence.
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
Uni... stop the fanboy-bashing while acting like a fanboy yourself.

I'm not bashing fanboys and I'm not acting like one either. You couldn't have gotten this more backwards. Go back and
Nexxo 10th November 2010, 13:24 Quote
Well, this has been informative.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaming
You have to give reasonable notice under law I think, people don't expect to open a laptop and have it explode - just the same as someone wouldn't expect to die from opening an unplugged TV. That's why they have warning stickers over them.

If Apple hasn't acknowledged this issue, and someone does open it - I'm sure Apple will say "curiosity got the cat" but UK and US law I believe will say you have to give proper notice, because.. cats can be curious.
And people can be idiots. "No user serviceable parts inside" is obviously not a clue. So we have microwaves that have to be explicit about not drying your pet poodle in it and coffee cups explicitly stating that the coffee is hot. Idiocracy, anyone?

Now people are warned not to try and open an Airbook because it may damage the batteries. Like people have been warned not to sit on their iPhone 4 or drop it on a hard surface because the high-tensile scratch-proof glass may break. Gosh, Apple sure makes crap products if they can't cope with being crowbarred open, dropped from a height, sat on, dunked in water, driven over... or perhaps contrary to what Apple hateboys suggest, Apple products are just not targeted at idiots.

MmmyeahOK. Modding is always at your own risk. You are taking delicate electronics beyond the envelope of their normal use and limits of normal operation. If it blows up in your face you entirely have yourself to blame. Stop being pussies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by barndoor101
if they are anything like iPhone 3G batteries then they will smoke and set on fire if punctured. One of my colleagues replaced his battery in his old iPhone 3G, so we had a spare battery pack lying around - if you havent seen one then imagine a squishy bag filled with gel.

we had a bright idea to put a screwdriver through it - theres still a scorch mark on his desk. the office had an acrid smell too.

My point exactly. Independent research by a mobile devices insurance company showed that Apple iPhones have the most reliable batteries on the market. Even the old Edge models are still fully functional. Right up to upgrading my 3G earlier this year its battery was just fine. So for starters I have to question why your colleague felt the need to change his.

Anyway, you whack a screw driver through it. You mean a metal screwdriver? One that perchance caused a short in the battery and a massive electrical discharge? Just sayin'.
billysielu 10th November 2010, 14:11 Quote
Could even go as far as to call Apple "irresponsible".
xela333 10th November 2010, 15:15 Quote
This thread has made my day : )
xela333 10th November 2010, 15:17 Quote
And I'm an apple hater. Not the company or the products, just a few of their fans who think Apple products are a gift from god.
eddtox 10th November 2010, 17:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by billysielu
Could even go as far as to call Apple "irresponsible".

If I open up my PSU and touch a capacitor it's not OCZ that's irresponsible.
leveller 10th November 2010, 18:27 Quote
To be clear, because I haven't followed all 3 pages so far, mainly just the main news item and a few jokers - but, do the batteries EXPLODE upon opening the laptop, or do they EXPLODE when damaged? There is a massive difference. The former would be a nightmare scenario because I'm fairly sure all of us have opened an electrical item at some point. The latter would be negligence on the modders part?
Sloth 10th November 2010, 18:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by billysielu
Could even go as far as to call Apple "irresponsible".
Could call every automobile manufacturer irresponsile. Vehicles get filled up with flammable material, then run a device which creates thousands of explosions during normal operation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by leveller
To be clear, because I haven't followed all 3 pages so far, mainly just the main news item and a few jokers - but, do the batteries EXPLODE upon opening the laptop, or do they EXPLODE when damaged? There is a massive difference. The former would be a nightmare scenario because I'm fairly sure all of us have opened an electrical item at some point. The latter would be negligence on the modders part?
The batteries can catch fire with impact/puncture/etc when not protected. By opening the laptop they are exposed to such threats, but are harmless just sitting there undisturbed.
Nexxo 10th November 2010, 20:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by billysielu
Could even go as far as to call Apple "irresponsible".
Yeah, fancy not making your products idiot-proof. Let's sue all car manufacturers now for all those road traffic accidents. Let's also sue alcoholic beverage producers for all the drink-drivers out there.

Give me a break. You open something that is not meant to be opened at your own risk. Modding is not for pussies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by xela333
And I'm an apple hater. Not the company or the products, just a few of their fans who think Apple products are a gift from god.
I hear that if you play an OSX installation disk backwards you hear satanic messages incanted by Jobs himself (Bill Gates and Linus Torvalds are in the chorus).
Quote:
Originally Posted by leveller
To be clear, because I haven't followed all 3 pages so far, mainly just the main news item and a few jokers - but, do the batteries EXPLODE upon opening the laptop, or do they EXPLODE when damaged? There is a massive difference. The former would be a nightmare scenario because I'm fairly sure all of us have opened an electrical item at some point. The latter would be negligence on the modders part?
I think the former would be the modder's responsibility too. It is pretty hard to open any laptop, let alone a Macbook Air. It is clearly not meant to be opened.

I mean, aerosol cannisters explode when opened. Fire extinguishers explode when opened. I can think of a crapload of things that explode when opened. Just don't open them. I think I see a way out of this problem...
The_Jonas 11th November 2010, 05:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlO
Wait! Explodes if hitted in the right place, and airport safe? All in a white an shiny exterior?
You made my morning.
perplekks45 11th November 2010, 07:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Yeah, fancy not making your products idiot-proof. Let's sue all car manufacturers now for all those road traffic accidents. Let's also sue alcoholic beverage producers for all the drink-drivers out there.

Give me a break. You open something that is not meant to be opened at your own risk. Modding is not for pussies.

I hear that if you play an OSX installation disk backwards you hear satanic messages incanted by Jobs himself (Bill Gates and Linus Torvalds are in the chorus).

I think the former would be the modder's responsibility too. It is pretty hard to open any laptop, let alone a Macbook Air. It is clearly not meant to be opened.

I mean, aerosol cannisters explode when opened. Fire extinguishers explode when opened. I can think of a crapload of things that explode when opened. Just don't open them. I think I see a way out of this problem...
This.


Did I just agree with Nexxo? :| I must be getting old...
PureSilver 12th November 2010, 14:10 Quote
Batteries = fragile, volatile chemical soups that are known hazards to your health in almost all of their many forms. Whether it's lead acid leaking from your car, aged AAs eating your TV remote, or Vaios amputating your legs, batteries are well known as something to avoid puncturing.

Modding = Unlicensed, unapproved and unwitting steps into the unknown, taken at your own risk. Especially with fragile, compact items like notebooks, your safety is the sole result of the care you take. If you decide to stab the inside of most things with a screwdriver, you won't like the results, and Li-poly batteries are no exception.

In other news;

Pope = Catholic

Bears = Still defecating in forested areas
Bakes 13th November 2010, 00:52 Quote
Haven't seen anyone point this out yet, so I thought I would

The screws used in the bottom of the new Macbook Air are deliberately designed to be anti-tamper, which you can easily see here:

http://guide-images.ifixit.net/igi/QflXjHlRNNgQU1rh.medium

The guys at iFixit had to file down some screwdrivers in order to use them - you will not be able to get inside this box without some serious effort - it's clearly not designed to be user-serviceable - and whilst you can, you clearly do it at your own risk - it's not like replacing the batteries in most mobiles.

It's like the detector in a smoke alarm - it's tamper-proof - possible to open if you put in enough effort but if you do, there's some dangerous americium inside.
perplekks45 13th November 2010, 13:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by PureSilver
Batteries = fragile, volatile chemical soups that are known hazards to your health in almost all of their many forms. Whether it's lead acid leaking from your car, aged AAs eating your TV remote, or Vaios amputating your legs, batteries are well known as something to avoid puncturing.

Modding = Unlicensed, unapproved and unwitting steps into the unknown, taken at your own risk. Especially with fragile, compact items like notebooks, your safety is the sole result of the care you take. If you decide to stab the inside of most things with a screwdriver, you won't like the results, and Li-poly batteries are no exception.

In other news;

Pope = Catholic

Bears = Still defecating in forested areas
rep++
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