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Hynix offers 20nm NAND chips

Hynix offers 20nm NAND chips

The new 20nm process from Hynix promises better yields and double capacity chips for future SSDs.

Hynix has announced that it has begun mass production of 64Gb NAND flash chips based around a 20nm process, opening up the possibility of another leap in SSD capacity.

The company's latest 20nm process means that it is able to produce 64Gb NAND flash chips the same physical size as its previous 32Gb models - theoretically allowing manufacturers using the older models to drop-in the new replacements for an instant doubling of capacity, or giving them the opportunity to use half as many chips for the same capacity in order to reduce costs or make power savings.

Pricing should improve as a result of the move, too: the company claims that its 300mm fabrication facility can get around 60 per cent better yields than the previous 30nm process - and better yields mean better prices, although how much of this saving might get passed down to the consumer level remains to be seen.

Dr. S. W. Park, the chief technology officer at the company, said that the move means that Hynix is now "enabled to provide customized, high performance products in a timely manner which perfectly suits mobile solutions including smartphones, table PCs and others."

So far no companies have announced that they are planning to use the new 20nm chips in their products, although Hynix has announced that it will be continuing its partnership with Israel-based SSD manufacturer Anobit and is looking to upgrade its devices to the new chips by September this year.

With solid-state storage becoming increasingly popular, moves like this are required in order to get the cost-per-megabyte down: while current models offer the capacity and performance required of, say, a boot drive, they're still priced out of the reach of many - especially if you're planning on using them for mass storage.

Are you thinking about holding out on an SSD purchase until 20nm becomes the norm, or are companies switching to Hynix's latest chips just likely to keep the cost savings for themselves? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

23 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
proxess 10th August 2010, 10:50 Quote
Anything to bring SSD capacity up and consumer prices down is always welcome!
crazyceo 10th August 2010, 10:52 Quote
Me likey!
SaNdCrAwLeR 10th August 2010, 10:53 Quote
I might finally buy an SSD for my build...
wish the new SSDs with these would come out at arround September (with the accompanying lower prices too) :P
Xir 10th August 2010, 11:31 Quote
They switch to a new node AND have 60% better yields at the same time?
Or was the 30nm node on 200mm wafers and the 20nm node on 300mm?
frontline 10th August 2010, 11:42 Quote
The manufacturers will have to pass on some of the saving to the customer to make it a truly mass-market product. Cheaper boot drives will be welcome, even if the mass storage option is some way away yet.
Floyd 10th August 2010, 12:35 Quote
I need bigger SSD drives and way lower prices before I switch from my 1tb drives.
hrp8600 10th August 2010, 12:45 Quote
whats wrong with a 1tb SSD @ £2,400 . ouch
Almightyrastus 10th August 2010, 12:56 Quote
So that is an increase in yield = win for them

An increase in capacity = win for us

A corresponding increase in price (well you are getting more space, it would only be logical)...........
fodder 10th August 2010, 13:16 Quote
Pass the savings onto the customer? Some of it is inevitable, unless it's an apple device of course...
l3v1ck 10th August 2010, 13:44 Quote
Sod the leap in SSD capacity, its a drop in SSD prices at existing capacities that I want to see.
Altron 10th August 2010, 15:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by l3v1ck
Sod the leap in SSD capacity, its a drop in SSD prices at existing capacities that I want to see.

Agreed. I don't care about the new 512GB SSDs, or having mass solid state storage., I want to see the mainstream 64, 128, and 256 GB SSDs come down in price and up in performance. Two of the new 64GB memory chips with a good controller (Sandforce or whatever the good one is), around the $100 mark, and I'd bite.
rickysio 10th August 2010, 15:22 Quote
Quote:
the company claims that its 300mm fabrication facility can get around 60 per cent better yields than the previous 30nm process

I went "WTF?" at this sentence till I realised that 300mm referred to the diameter of the silicon wafer... :P
RonanH 10th August 2010, 16:42 Quote
Hynix made about €1billion nett profit in first half of this year... they are a pretty big player, used to be Hyundai Electronics. Hopefully they can push the price of nand down. Would be far easier if people stopped buying iCrap :D
HourBeforeDawn 10th August 2010, 17:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by proxess
Anything to bring SSD capacity up and consumer prices down is always welcome!

agreed ^_^
shanky887614 10th August 2010, 18:11 Quote
going on cost per megabytes is not a very good method surely

that means if a 500GB ssd cost £100
that it would be 0.01953125p per MB
this is impracticle it should be per GB which would be 20p per GB
but im not buying till down to under 8p per GB
runadumb 10th August 2010, 19:23 Quote
Oh been waiting on this although I though intel were first in line for dieshrinks. Anyway I just built a new i7 system but held off on an SSD as I knew faster, larger and cheaper drives where just around the corner. Only really interested in 64Gig for a boot drive. Whenever the price really drops I will get 256/512 for a steam drive also.
ZERO <ibis> 11th August 2010, 00:23 Quote
I could care less about capacity but as long as 60gb drives go up and speed and down in price I am happy!
perplekks45 11th August 2010, 07:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanky887614
but im not buying till down to under 8p per GB
That's gonna be a looooong wait for you, mate...

Anything to make a 64GB SSD more affordable is great. I don't need 1TB SSDs, I run a desktop PC not a bloody server with massive I/O! :|
TSR2 11th August 2010, 12:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
That's gonna be a looooong wait for you, mate...

Yes, even physical HDD's only got that cheap really last year.

I might begin to consider a small SSD when they get to £1/GB, but at present I can't really justify paying that much :(
Elton 11th August 2010, 12:42 Quote
A pop a GB isn't too bad, it's still a bit expensive, but it's not horrendously expensive..as it is now.
Cthippo 11th August 2010, 23:28 Quote
Maybe it's just my own predilections, but I personally prefer to have my OS and most of my data separate. Currently I'm running a 73GB SCSI drive for my boot drive and the bulk of my data is on my 1TB fileserver. A 64 GB SSD would be more than adequate as a boot drive for what I need, but I'm not yet convinced that the speed delta is worth the extra cost.
greywood 17th August 2010, 19:36 Quote
to SSD at any size or price-point until I can get "disk-image" backup and restore software that will work with them. That capability has saved my butt soooo many times with HDDs!!
Gareth Halfacree 17th August 2010, 20:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywood
to SSD at any size or price-point until I can get "disk-image" backup and restore software that will work with them. That capability has saved my butt soooo many times with HDDs!!
I'm confused - why do you think that imaging software *doesn't* work with SSDs?
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