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Super Talent announces USB & SATA SSD

Super Talent announces USB & SATA SSD

Super Talent's latest SSD has both SATA and USB interfaces, making switching from a mechanical drive easier.

Super Talent has launched what it hopes will be the obvious choice for anyone looking to upgrade to solid-state storage in the near future: a dual-interface SSD which can connect via SATA or USB.

The UltraDrive MX SSD, announced by the company earlier this week and first spotted by SlashGear, features a neat system which the company hopes will make it easier for users to upgrade their system to run on an SSD.

While those of a technical mindset - such as you, dear reader - would find the installation of an SSD simple, the thought of having to somehow back up all the data and re-install and operating system fills most computer users with a sense of dread. By adding a USB port to the gadget, Super Talent is hoping to make it easy for users to clone the contents of their existing mechanical hard drive to the UltraDrive MX before swapping the two over - without the need to buy an additional SATA to USB converter.

Although the USB connectivity is designed to appeal to the less technical, Super Talent doesn't appear to have scrimped on the specifications: using a JMicron 616 controller, the UltraDrive MX hits 250MB/s read and 180MB/s write speeds - not the fastest in the world, but certainly a worthy performer. TRIM support is also included as standard.

The UltraDrive MX is expected to start shipping in September in 60GB, 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB capacities, but so far Super Talent hasn't offered any clues as to pricing - but with the company stating that the UltraDrive MX "represents a premium consumer offering [fitting] nicely between our Value Line and Enterprise SSD offerings" expect to pay extra for the convenience of USB.

Do you think a USB/SATA dual-interface device is a good idea, or is it a waste if all you're going to do is use it once to initially load your data on and then never remove the SSD from your machine? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

6 Comments

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frojoe 29th July 2010, 14:29 Quote
As long as it doesn't jack up the price, being able to easily hook it up to any computer could be very useful, even if most of the time it was used over sata. I just hope people don't leave it hooked up over usb, and then complain about no performance boost.
do_it_anyway 29th July 2010, 18:13 Quote
I don't get it.
If someone is going to open their PC to connect to SATA, why do they need the USB?
Surely they could attach it to a SATA port, copy their whatnots across, then simply select the SSD as the "main" drive.
I kinda get it for a laptop user who wouldn't be able to have 2 drives running concurrently, but for the average desktop user, surely copying via USB is an extra step, and therefore complicating, not simplifying?

Or am I missing something?
esdubu 29th July 2010, 18:49 Quote
I've got a usb port on a 2 year old OCZ Core SSD. This is nothing new?
Altron 29th July 2010, 19:47 Quote
i may be wrong, but don't you need to do specific things to make a drive bootable? Like a MBR, that 100MB system partition windows installs, etc?

I was not under the impression that it was as simple as plugging in a USB drive, copying over the files, then switching them. Is it?
mi1ez 29th July 2010, 20:09 Quote
still no USB3?
McSteel 30th July 2010, 20:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altron
i may be wrong, but don't you need to do specific things to make a drive bootable? Like a MBR, that 100MB system partition windows installs, etc?

I was not under the impression that it was as simple as plugging in a USB drive, copying over the files, then switching them. Is it?

It isn't, if you copy "manually", but if you use specialized software, perhaps some products from the kitchens of Acronis, Paragon, Symantec, etc., then you could make a 1:1, bit-for-bit disk image and deploy it onto the SSD... Maybe even Super Talent supplies their own duplication software? Or has plans to do so?

In any (and every) case, doing this over USB is adding an extra step to the process, except in the case of a laptop (or any other system) that can't run both the original disk and the SSD simultaneously.

Also, if you take into account that SATA-to-USB interfaces aren't expensive nor hard to find or implement, not having an already built-in USB interface in your SSD is a non-issue. If this is Super Talent's selling point, it's bland at best.
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