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Gigabyte launches Cloud based overclocking

Gigabyte launches Cloud based overclocking

Gigabyte Cloud OC software uses the web to remotely connect to your PC and overclock it.

Computex 2010 Gigabyte announced it's preparing a new overclocking app for its motherboards, called Cloud OC. The application is web-based and when running can be accessed remotely through any web-enabled device, from PC through to smartphone.

Deputy Director of Gigabyte Marketing, Tim Handley, told us that "[Cloud OC] is just like [Gigabyte's] EasyTune 6 software, but mobile."

The software can overclock your system on the fly too, so users can tweak their OC settings even as tests and benchmarks are running. We pointed out this might be considered cheating, but Gigabyte compared it to knobs and switches on competitive motherboards that could also do the same thing. Apparently very subtle, realtime customisation is required by pro-overclockers to get the best result from every performance test. The only limitation of the Cloud OC software is that it can't change the memory's CAS latency - but every other setting can be changed according to Gigabyte.

Cloud OC also shows realtime readouts of voltages and temperatures to check how the PC is running, and it also turn the PC on/off or send it to sleep. It's clearly meant to compete with Asus' RoG Connect software, which allows you to control your system's overclocked settings via a USB-connected laptop or Bluetooth device.

Cloud OC isn't tied into Gigabyte's existing overclocking software, EasyTune 6. Instead, it's a completely separate piece of software. Gigabyte has also updated EasyTune 6 to include profile saving and hotkey activation. There are three profiles available that can be setup to quickly change several settings on the fly at the touch of a button, however both EasyTune 6 and its new profile hotkey option isn't yet tied into the Cloud OC function just yet.

Does remote control 'cloud based' overclocking software twoodle your noodle? Let us know in the forums.

Gigabyte launches Cloud based overclocking Gigabyte looks to the Cloud to OC
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10 Comments

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bigsharn 10th June 2010, 09:18 Quote
I can see how this can be greatly abused if someone gets hold of your mobile...
Jipa 10th June 2010, 09:33 Quote
I'd genuinely want some overclocking site/team to make a short article of all these wacky ways of overclocking, and which (if any) they've found to actually work or be even remotely useful. I'm not such a keen clocker, but gosh, what's wrong in doing it the way everyone else does?
mi1ez 10th June 2010, 09:46 Quote
Great concept, directly outdoes Asus' ROGconnect (or whatever it's called)
[USRF]Obiwan 10th June 2010, 10:07 Quote
You could theoretically as a cracker. Hang, crash or fry any Cloud OC PC system in the world. As a cracker this would be the ultimate cracking experience!
crazyceo 10th June 2010, 10:33 Quote
I suppose if you left your system running benchtests because you have a hot date on a friday night and realise that by 10:30 you're still out partying. You know the tests have finished but don't want your system running full pelt doing nothing. Then great, log while you are showing off your new body poppin' moves and your evening is building up to be perfect in every way. You got the girl, your rig isn't in meltdown and everyone in the club thinks you are cool!

Open them eyes and wake up to realise, you're a geek and can never get that date in the first place. So it's useless!
wuyanxu 10th June 2010, 11:05 Quote
a more complicated, internet-requiring way of real-time overclocking.

what's wrong with Asus's connecting a netbook through USB? everyone has got one, it's more reliable, less fussy and doesn't require constant internet connection. besides, it actually works great, and allows you to even remotely flash your BIOS (if i remember correctly)
Cyberpower-UK 10th June 2010, 11:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipa
I'd genuinely want some overclocking site/team to make a short article of all these wacky ways of overclocking, and which (if any) they've found to actually work or be even remotely useful. I'm not such a keen clocker, but gosh, what's wrong in doing it the way everyone else does?

EZTune and Turbo-V work well on x58 and P55 systems because they actually modify the BIOS value on the fly and for the most part they have the same steps as the BIOS.

If this works by remotely tapping into EZTune then there's no reason to expect it not to work but don't expect the stability of a professionally BIOS tuned system.
gcwebbyuk 10th June 2010, 12:17 Quote
DO you mean Gigabyte EZTune? I was advised not to use it, as overclocking a quad core CPU, it only OC's the 1st core, leaving the other 3 at stock speed. I may be wrong though....
Techspat 11th June 2010, 11:23 Quote
I think it's way cool! 3D benchmarks require you to run them in full screen mode and this cloud feature will let you keep an eye on your settings and temperatures.
bw67958 13th June 2010, 18:57 Quote
To be honest I don't think I'd ever use something like this, mainly because if I'm overclocking my PC I'm doing it in front of my PC so I can see the results!
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