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Kingmax unveils invisible heat sinks

Kingmax unveils invisible heat sinks

New Kingmax memory modules are set to include an innovative feature: invisible heat sinks.

Kingmax has announced its latest - and rather bizarre - innovation in memory chips: the invisible heat sink.

The company's latest memory products come with something Kingmax is calling a "Nano Thermal Dissipation Technology" layer - which it claims can "increase the release of radiant heat."

Although the company's press release is a little light on technical details, the technology apparently takes the form of a "nano-size silicon compound [that] fills up the invisible vacant space of the smooth surface to remove the surface heat more quickly[, acting] like a sponge [to] pull the heat and release into the air at a faster rate" than an untreated chip.

In actual terms, the company claims that the technology - however it turns out to work - makes a real-world difference of around two degrees Celsius, which could mean a more stable overclock in marginal situations. Kingmax also claims that the coating can be combined with traditional active and passive cooling systems - including watercooling - to further increase the performance gains.

The first memory modules to feature the nano thermal dissipation technology coating will be Kingmax's Long-DIMM DDRIII 2400 Dual-Channel 4GB kits, comprising two 2GB DIMMs running at 2400Mhz and designed to operate at voltages between 1.5 to 1.8V. All treated modules will come with Kingmax's lifetime warranty - and as the company is aiming these modules at overclockers, we'd hope that Kingmax won't mind if you tweak the voltages or speeds from stock in order to see exactly how much difference the 'invisible' heatsinks make.

So far Kingmax hasn't announced availability of the modules in the UK markets, nor how much such magical nanotechnology will set you back.

Do you think that the Kingmax technology holds promise, or are you yet to be convinced that it's not a load of snake-oil? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

44 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Picarro 9th June 2010, 11:19 Quote
That is utter bull-hit. Everyone who has studied just a bit of physics know that you need to maximise the surface layer, not fill out all the cracks with super-nano-goo.
Glix 9th June 2010, 11:29 Quote
The king's new clothes have arrived xD
Zayfod 9th June 2010, 11:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingmax
...acting] like a sponge [to] pull the heat and release into the air at a faster rate...

So it's like a wicking fabric, only nano, invisible, and for heat? Could work I suppose, if you happen to live in "Physics Experiment Land" where every process can operate in neat isolation from every other process.
eddtox 9th June 2010, 12:00 Quote
Hahahaha... Well that's nothing compared to MY invisible, intangible cooling solution which may reduce CPU temperatures by 20 degrees when coupled with an approved heatsink cooler. Only £9.99. Call 1-800-GULLIBLE and ask for a wake-up call.
mi1ez 9th June 2010, 12:11 Quote
Sponge. Great insulator. Poor metaphor.
Xir 9th June 2010, 12:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Picarro
That is utter bull-hit. Everyone who has studied just a bit of physics know that you need to maximise the surface layer, not fill out all the cracks with super-nano-goo.

That's probably what ist does, maximise surface area on a nano-scale
Fizzban 9th June 2010, 12:34 Quote
Sounds like a gimmick. Will have to wait until bit tech/custom pc get hold of some for review.
13eightyfour 9th June 2010, 12:43 Quote
So to save money they arent putting aluminium spreaders on them and to justify it there using a solution that cant be seen?

are kingmax nigerian by any chance?
BlackMage23 9th June 2010, 13:02 Quote
Hey, I just invented an invisible CPU, any buyers?
tristanperry 9th June 2010, 13:05 Quote
Sounds like a gimmick. Will look forward to the reviews though.
[USRF]Obiwan 9th June 2010, 13:13 Quote
My invisible heat exchanger is a thing called "Oxygen"
StoneyMahoney 9th June 2010, 13:58 Quote
So, basically it's a kind of pre-applied TIM using the surrounding air as the dissipator? Judgment reserved until independent figures released. Could be a game-changer, more likely to be a white elephant.
Claave 9th June 2010, 14:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzban
Sounds like a gimmick. Will have to wait until bit tech/custom pc get hold of some for review.

Unfortunately, DRAM chips don't have thermal sensors, there's not much chance of being able to verify the technology. I suppose you could apply the goo (?) to something that does have a thermal diode, but as those chips require large heatsinks to keep them cool, we're into the realms of TIM testing and that's a whole can of worms...
Sheiken 9th June 2010, 14:38 Quote
I sell invisible gold and diamonds, genuine goods I swear!
Mraedis 9th June 2010, 14:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Picarro
That is utter bull-hit. Everyone who has studied just a bit of physics know that you need to maximise the surface layer, not fill out all the cracks with super-nano-goo.

Are you familiar with the physical properties of a sponge, good sir? It's maximized surface to mass ratio! Goodness me.
Deadpunkdave 9th June 2010, 15:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Picarro
That is utter bull-hit. Everyone who has studied just a bit of physics know that you need to maximise the surface layer, not fill out all the cracks with super-nano-goo.

And anyone who knows a bit of nanophotonics will tell you that nano-scale structures have a tendency towards phonon confinement, thus decreasing thermal conductivity. Since the engineers probably aren't completely incompetent, I would suggest that they have found an application with the reverse effect. It's quite amazing the number of people who seem to have decided that 'if you can't see it, it doesn't work'.
Quote:
Originally Posted by [USRF
Obiwan]My invisible heat exchanger is a thing called "Oxygen"

Presumably, you are a fan of explosions inside your pc case? =p
DriftCarl 9th June 2010, 16:15 Quote
wonder if I can buy them using my revolutionary invisible £20 notes
rickysio 9th June 2010, 16:17 Quote
The key issue is that if the coating will survive installation.

Gripping the coating and attempting to shove the RAM stick down = no more coating.
ZERO <ibis> 9th June 2010, 17:43 Quote
So they claim that they made a thermal paste so efficient that it by itself is better than a decent HT with shitty thermal paste!? If this is true I am surprised they are not coming out marketing the paste. I mean if it is that good I want to put it on everything!
borandi 9th June 2010, 17:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claave
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzban
Sounds like a gimmick. Will have to wait until bit tech/custom pc get hold of some for review.

Unfortunately, DRAM chips don't have thermal sensors, there's not much chance of being able to verify the technology. I suppose you could apply the goo (?) to something that does have a thermal diode, but as those chips require large heatsinks to keep them cool, we're into the realms of TIM testing and that's a whole can of worms...

There are some Crucial Ballistix with sensors, and it is part of the DDR3 spec.

An another note, this won't help in OC situations. I've never known an OC to fail 'because the RAM is too warm' - usually it's because they're being push too hard in terms of Volts and they go POP or lose data coherency.
flaming_goat 9th June 2010, 17:59 Quote
I thought the purpose of most ram sinks was to look cool and display branding. These only do the latter and look distinctly boring.
Woodspoon 9th June 2010, 18:02 Quote
"Kingmax also claims that the coating can be combined with traditional active and passive cooling systems - including watercooling - to further increase the performance gains."

Sounds like some sort of funky TIM, more than a new cooling solution, but who knows it might just work.
mrbens 9th June 2010, 18:06 Quote
Imagine how hard it would be to build a PC if everything was nano-sized!
Azayles 9th June 2010, 18:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xir
Quote:
Originally Posted by Picarro
That is utter bull-hit. Everyone who has studied just a bit of physics know that you need to maximise the surface layer, not fill out all the cracks with super-nano-goo.

That's probably what ist does, maximise surface area on a nano-scale

So it's not invisible as it is too small to see with the naked eye.

Kingmax, this idea is 'king dumb.
dyzophoria 9th June 2010, 18:57 Quote
lol, i want to see it first before judging it though
docodine 9th June 2010, 19:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glix
The king's new clothes have arrived xD

qft
HourBeforeDawn 9th June 2010, 20:09 Quote
lol this sounds like the story about the guy who made invisible clothing for the king and the king believed him and so did the people when in reality he was wearing nothing at all but hey all things are possible.
HourBeforeDawn 9th June 2010, 20:10 Quote
crap just noticed someone already made a comment about that lol dang...
Bakes 9th June 2010, 20:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Picarro
That is utter bull-hit. Everyone who has studied just a bit of physics know that you need to maximise the surface layer, not fill out all the cracks with super-nano-goo.

Reasons why it could be good:

1) the material is good at radiating heat. If the material is a good radiator, the temperature could drop.

2) In contact with heatsinks, this could just be a fancy form of TIM. You don't try to maximise the surface area on your CPU do you?
Pete J 9th June 2010, 21:16 Quote
Well, when you get some, send it to me. I'll put it under the SEM and see if they're really applying nanoparticles. I'll have to cut it up, mind .
Bakes 9th June 2010, 21:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete J
Well, when you get some, send it to me. I'll put it under the SEM and see if they're really applying nanoparticles. I'll have to cut it up, mind .

You sound like you've got the kind of job I'd like in the future :D
Jipa 9th June 2010, 21:47 Quote
Wouldn't mind if one manufacturer just came out with a "Memory chips don't really need cooling so these sticks don't have any stupid mile-high cooling towers and thus they may actually fit on your board and under that CPU-cooler of yours"-series of memories.

This, on the other hand.. Well I have my doubts.
The_Beast 9th June 2010, 22:12 Quote
I'd rather have a heat sink, naked ram sticks are ugly to me
Jipa 9th June 2010, 22:28 Quote
You could slap some aftermarket heatsinks on the chips if you REALLY care.
The_Beast 9th June 2010, 22:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipa
You could slap some aftermarket heatsinks on the chips if you REALLY care.

but wouldn't that defeat the whole purpose of the "invisible heat sink"
John_T 9th June 2010, 23:33 Quote
Sod the invisible heatsinks, I want invisible RAM!

Seriously though, I have to agree with Deadpunkdave - it really is quite strange how it's almost unanimous that because you can't see it, it must automatically be hocus-pocus. An i7-980X six core chip apparently has 1.17 BILLION transistors on in, damned if I can see a single one of them, doesn't mean they're not there though...
Bakes 10th June 2010, 00:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_T
Sod the invisible heatsinks, I want invisible RAM!

Seriously though, I have to agree with Deadpunkdave - it really is quite strange how it's almost unanimous that because you can't see it, it must automatically be hocus-pocus. An i7-980X six core chip apparently has 1.17 BILLION transistors on in, damned if I can see a single one of them, doesn't mean they're not there though...

It's that people just aren't reading the content of the article and are just reading the title. This is not an invisible heatsink as per say, it's a kind of funky TIM that increases heat dissipation.
Dragunover 10th June 2010, 01:37 Quote
Doesn't really help seeing as how they modules are covered... Yeah, that's right, they're covered.

Anywho, I'd like to just buy decent memory that doesn't have memory heatsinks that are twice as large as the actual RAM sticks, those mobo designs are getting better but not the heatsinks on the RAM, so therefore I can't put a big copper/aluminum tower HS/F on top of my CPU in most cases..
Jipa 10th June 2010, 06:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Beast
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipa
You could slap some aftermarket heatsinks on the chips if you REALLY care.

but wouldn't that defeat the whole purpose of the "invisible heat sink"

Oh sorry, thought you were commenting on my post just above yours.
Mraedis 10th June 2010, 07:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes
It's that people just aren't reading the content of the article and are just reading the title. This is not an invisible heatsink as per say, it's a kind of funky TIM that increases heat dissipation.

+1

It's regular RAM with optimized heat dissipation, not an 'invisible' heatsink attached to it.

I bet you could add some coolant paste and a heatsink and the dissipation will be 'transfered' because of optimised contant between paste and RAM.
[USRF]Obiwan 10th June 2010, 10:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deadpunkdave
Quote:
Originally Posted by [USRF
Obiwan]My invisible heat exchanger is a thing called "Oxygen"

Presumably, you are a fan of explosions inside your pc case? =p

Let me further enhance that to Liquid Oxygen
Very explosive, especially when mixed with Ozone, but extremely cold and I could in theory levitate my pc...


But in reality I was pointing to Oxygen in the form of O2.
Azayles 10th June 2010, 12:35 Quote
It's strange the number of people who say about the hazards of oxygen, but don't realise it's not the oxygen itself that's explosive etc. You can't light oxygen, you need something to be alight or at least incandescent for a reaction to occur. Oxygen simply enhances the reaction that's already there.
So to summarise, oxygen inside your computer case will do nothing unless your computer is already on fire.

In which case you're f*cked.
metarinka 10th June 2010, 17:30 Quote
the material scientist in me guesses its a coating that increases the ability for it to radiate heat in the infrared spectrum. Hence it makes the thing more efficient for radiant cooling, convection is still the main cooling mechanism and convection does benefit from higher surface area.

but as mentioned ram usually doesn't thermally overload.
yougotkicked 11th June 2010, 22:03 Quote
well, despite all you nay-sayers, a thermodynamics nerd is here to say; I think this is real. while it is true that maximizing surface area is usually the best way to improve cooling, there are other ways to go about it. if Kingmax is simply coating their RAM modules with a thin layer of a highly heat-conductive material, it could serve to move the heat more evenly around the module, making better use of the surface area the module already provides. microscopic cracks and such don't actually add enough surface area to improve cooling, but they do inhibit the transfer of heat across the PCB, causing heat to concentrate in smaller areas, where it takes longer to dissipate.

I'm not sure what Kingmax is doing, or how effective it really will be, but there certainly is the potential for something like this to work.
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