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Gigabyte shows Super Overclocked Radeon HD 5870

Gigabyte shows Super Overclocked Radeon HD 5870

Gigabyte's Radeon HD 5870 Super Overclock features a custom PCB, several high capacity capacitors and an aftermarket cooler

When we dropped into Gigabyte's main Taipei office, its engineers showed us their latest creation, a completely custom 'Super Overclocked' Radeon HD 5870. It's both a mix of after-market cooling with a Gigabyte designed custom PCB underneath, plus a hefty overclock to top it off.

The PCB features the usual Gigabyte technology: 2oz copper PCB and it uses the same quality of components its motherboards are renowned for. On the underside of the board, Gigabyte has opted to use five 'NEC Prodlizers' - basically massive, low profile film capacitors that are designed to work in the GHz frequency range of switching and high current. Gigabyte claims this technology should enable better, stable overclocks.

In addition there's GPU and memory voltage changing options in Gigabyte's tweaking software and as with high-end motherboards, voltage read points on the board for overclockers, although they aren't particularly well designed - they're just small solder points.

The HD 5870 GPUs themselves are clocked at 950MHz - up from 850MHz retail stock, and they're cherry-picked dies, using a method Gigabyte calls the "Gauntlet" régime. This process was first started with the GTX 260 and 275 last year, but unfortunately for Gigabyte, Nvidia promptly discontinued the supply of those chips, so it was unable to really see the idea into the market.

On the cooler side, the dual-fan, four heatpipe arrangement should work well, given our previous experience with this type of cooler, although the downside is that the hot air isn't vented from your case. Note the memory doesn't receive any extra cooling, but even so it's clocked at a round 5GHz, up from 4.8GHz on the stock cards.

It's interesting to see the Gigabyte approach compared to the MSI HD 5870 Lightning for example: the MSI has a completely redesigned PCB also, but it's much larger, supports two 8-pin PCI-E power connectors and has far more power phases but doesn't have the same sort of heavy duty capacitors, yet also uses a dual fan cooler. Despite the MSI currently winning 3DMark records under LN2, it retails with just a 50MHz clock bump on the core and nothing extra on the memory.

Priced at a whopping £434 here, even in Gigabyte's own words it's expensive, especially when we see that the MSI is £389 and the Sapphire Vapor-X is around £350 too.

Do you fancy this new HD 5870 or is the £434 Gigabyte just too much to ask? Let us know your thoughts in the forums.

Gigabyte shows Super Overclocked Radeon HD 5870 Gigabyte shows its Super OC Radeon HD 5870
Click to enlarge

Gigabyte shows Super Overclocked Radeon HD 5870 Gigabyte shows its Super OC Radeon HD 5870
Click to enlarge

Gigabyte shows Super Overclocked Radeon HD 5870 Gigabyte shows its Super OC Radeon HD 5870
Click to enlarge

Gigabyte shows Super Overclocked Radeon HD 5870 Gigabyte shows its Super OC Radeon HD 5870
Click to enlarge

Gigabyte shows Super Overclocked Radeon HD 5870 Gigabyte shows its Super OC Radeon HD 5870
Click to enlarge

23 Comments

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Omnituens 16th April 2010, 12:52 Quote
Blue PCB looks odd on a graphics card for some reason.
Hovisloaf 16th April 2010, 13:05 Quote
May aswell buy a 5970
EvilMerc 16th April 2010, 13:07 Quote
But I could see that blue going well with a Gigabyte motherboard though. If I had that much money to dump on a graphics card I'd probably buy it, but I'd probably go for the Vapor-X if my budget didn't stretch that far.
That cooler does look a lot like a curvy version of a Palit Sonic 4870 though, any info on where the hot air goes because with the Pailt it just gets shoved back into the case..
Xir 16th April 2010, 13:30 Quote
looking for the Vapor-X myself (as it's supposed to be very quiet)
javaman 16th April 2010, 14:22 Quote
i would wait for the benchmarks but even then i couldnt afford it anyway.
Mraedis 16th April 2010, 14:42 Quote
No link in article?
xaser04 16th April 2010, 14:47 Quote
Great looking card but too expensive to be justifiable in my opinion.
N0iz 16th April 2010, 14:53 Quote
Lol if it EVER overheats I'll **** my pants
Goty 16th April 2010, 16:29 Quote
Meh, the uncovered RAM ICs bother me. They get pretty toasty even with heatsinks.
BlackRaven 16th April 2010, 17:40 Quote
I got 4 GB RAM, ASUS mobo and i5-750 for 383 euro... The pricing on these things is just nuts.
Farfalho 16th April 2010, 17:59 Quote
They aren't RAM IC's, they're the "Prodilizers" stated in the article. I would like to see some testing/review/benchmarking because of the extra 100MHz bump on the gpu and the 200MHz on the memories. Bindi, have you requested the graphics card for some BT testing?
Xtrafresh 16th April 2010, 18:29 Quote
At best this would be able to fetch an extra 20-30 over a normal 5870, but i'd never choose this over an MSI Lighning or an Asus Matrix.
Bindibadgi 17th April 2010, 04:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farfalho
They aren't RAM IC's, they're the "Prodilizers" stated in the article. I would like to see some testing/review/benchmarking because of the extra 100MHz bump on the gpu and the 200MHz on the memories. Bindi, have you requested the graphics card for some BT testing?

I could possibly request it. But at £4-hundred-and-something-quid, is it ever even a real purchasing consideration?
Goty 17th April 2010, 06:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farfalho
They aren't RAM IC's, they're the "Prodilizers" stated in the article. I would like to see some testing/review/benchmarking because of the extra 100MHz bump on the gpu and the 200MHz on the memories. Bindi, have you requested the graphics card for some BT testing?

I was referring to this part of the article:
Quote:
Note the memory doesn't receive any extra cooling
stonedsurd 17th April 2010, 06:52 Quote
I'd like to see the max clocks on the chip. It might be a fun card to pair with a 980X for those HWBot runs.
Fizzban 17th April 2010, 08:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
I could possibly request it. But at £4-hundred-and-something-quid, is it ever even a real purchasing consideration?

I seem to remember you guys benched the Asus Mars. And you could hardly call one of those a purchasing consideration :p
Xtrafresh 17th April 2010, 13:38 Quote
Right, but the Mars spikes our interest because it's the very best that money can buy at the moment. It's just something to drool over. What with the MSI Lightning taking OC records, and the Asus Matrix 2GB 5870 being the more desirable (and cheaper) 2GB card, i don't really see a place for this GigaByte card, unless you absolutely have to have a blue one.
Bindibadgi 17th April 2010, 14:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzban
I seem to remember you guys benched the Asus Mars. And you could hardly call one of those a purchasing consideration :p

Yes but that was an engineering marvel. This is just an expensive 5870 with 5 whopping great big caps slapped to the back. :P
Fizzban 18th April 2010, 11:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
Yes but that was an engineering marvel. This is just an expensive 5870 with 5 whopping great big caps slapped to the back. :P

Fair enough then. I agree it wouldn't be an option for me. The ati cards could already do with a price drop, rather than there being ever more expensive versions of what is already available.
Mongoose132 18th April 2010, 18:50 Quote
Who buys those Super-Cards :S

In a month or two your £400 all singing all dancing Tea-Making super card will be on par with a £100 offering, I understand the early adopters urge, but that's insane :o
yanglu 18th April 2010, 21:53 Quote
I wonder how it compares performance wise to the GTX 480... Its obviously going to be a lot quieter and run a lot cooler but priced at £434 it's hitting a similar price range.
eternal_fantasy 18th April 2010, 22:49 Quote
Bit-Tech... get your spelling right! It's called "Proadlizer", not "Prodilizer" as stated in the article.
Bindibadgi 19th April 2010, 02:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by eternal_fantasy
Bit-Tech... get your spelling right! It's called "Proadlizer", not "Prodilizer" as stated in the article.

That's what it said in the Gigabyte fluff!
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